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BUSINESS
November 1, 1988 | Associated Press
Fourteen public utilities across Washington state voted Monday to approve a $226-million settlement that would let them out of the giant Washington Public Power Supply System securities fraud trial. "It's a (settlement) we can certainly live with and handle, and it won't have great diverse . . . impact on our state," said Tacoma attorney Albert Malanca, who engineered the complex agreement involving utilities, the State of Washington and the federal Bonneville Power Administration.
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NEWS
December 19, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Skyrocketing energy prices and California's recent demands for the cheap federal hydropower that fuels the Pacific Northwest's $4-billion-a-year aluminum industry have unleashed widespread resentment in Washington state and Oregon--which are just beginning to feel the downside of the deregulation movement. Both states, whose residents traditionally have enjoyed some of the cheapest prices in the nation, face the same soaring rates that are plaguing California.
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NEWS
December 19, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Skyrocketing energy prices and California's recent demands for the cheap federal hydropower that fuels the Pacific Northwest's $4-billion-a-year aluminum industry have unleashed widespread resentment in Washington state and Oregon--which are just beginning to feel the downside of the deregulation movement. Both states, whose residents traditionally have enjoyed some of the cheapest prices in the nation, face the same soaring rates that are plaguing California.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Utility Offers Pay-As-You-Go Meters: Spokane-based Inland Power & Light Co., a cooperative utility, is promoting a new meter that allows customers to see how much electricity they have used in the past 24 hours and how much they are using at any given moment. Customers can determine which appliances consume the most power by watching the meter fluctuate as they turn devices off and on.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Oxsen still winces at the nickname that was affixed to his utility back when it was synonymous with wild cost overruns in nuclear power construction. Oxsen much prefers "Supply System." His preference is understandable. In 1983, when the Washington Public Power Supply System defaulted on $2.25 billion in bonds in the biggest municipal bond failure ever, nothing summed up its problems better than the acronym WHOOPS. Now, the nickname seems dated.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Utility Offers Pay-As-You-Go Meters: Spokane-based Inland Power & Light Co., a cooperative utility, is promoting a new meter that allows customers to see how much electricity they have used in the past 24 hours and how much they are using at any given moment. Customers can determine which appliances consume the most power by watching the meter fluctuate as they turn devices off and on.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
After years as national leaders in conservation, California's utilities have abandoned their aggressive role in cutting customers' energy use and now lag behind other innovators, prompting worries that they are encouraging the burning of more fossil fuels in an era of global warming and intractable smog problems.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Oxsen still winces at the nickname that was affixed to his utility back when it was synonymous with wild cost overruns in nuclear power construction. Oxsen much prefers "Supply System." His preference is understandable. In 1983, when the Washington Public Power Supply System defaulted on $2.25 billion in bonds in the biggest municipal bond failure ever, nothing summed up its problems better than the acronym WHOOPS. Now, the nickname seems dated.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1988 | Associated Press
Fourteen public utilities across Washington state voted Monday to approve a $226-million settlement that would let them out of the giant Washington Public Power Supply System securities fraud trial. "It's a (settlement) we can certainly live with and handle, and it won't have great diverse . . . impact on our state," said Tacoma attorney Albert Malanca, who engineered the complex agreement involving utilities, the State of Washington and the federal Bonneville Power Administration.
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