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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1998 | BONNIE HARRIS HAYES and GREG HERNANDEZ and JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Five million gallons of water burst through an aging storage tank and slammed into a Westminster neighborhood early Monday, tossing cars and flattening garages in a disaster that former city officials said could have been avoided. Six people were injured and at least 30 left temporarily homeless after the tidal wave gushed from a 22-foot-high hole in the above-ground reservoir and rushed through a nearby fire station and the Hefley Square Town Homes. "I thought we were going to die," said Capt.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1999 | Louise Roug, (714) 966-5977
The City Council on Tuesday formally accepted $400,000 in aid from the state for the Hefley Street water tank, which ruptured in September. Gov. Gray Davis approved the grant to replace the water tank in the new state budget. The city has not yet decided whether a second, empty reservoir structurally similar to the Hefley Street tank should be replaced or repaired. Officials are awaiting the results of a study by engineers and a request for federal assistance before making a decision.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1998 | JANET WILSON and BONNIE HARRIS HAYES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Westminster city officials have known for at least six years that their aging pair of water tanks needed costly repairs to keep them safe, records show. Besides needing to retrofit their 5-million-gallon reservoirs against earthquake damage, repairs have been needed since at least 1992 for more than a dozen wells, upgrades that would have cost roughly $20 million.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | GREG HERNANDEZ and JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Damages and expenses from this week's rupture of a water storage tank could run $20 million to $25 million, city and Orange County officials said Thursday. City officials estimated total damage at $20 million. They said there is enough insurance to cover that amount. The city, though, must pay the first $350,000 in losses. To get money more quickly to families in the hard-hit, 49-unit Hefley Square condominiums, the county asked the state Thursday for $25 million in financial assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1999 | Louise Roug, (714) 966-5977
The City Council on Tuesday formally accepted $400,000 in aid from the state for the Hefley Street water tank, which ruptured in September. Gov. Gray Davis approved the grant to replace the water tank in the new state budget. The city has not yet decided whether a second, empty reservoir structurally similar to the Hefley Street tank should be replaced or repaired. Officials are awaiting the results of a study by engineers and a request for federal assistance before making a decision.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | GREG HERNANDEZ and JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Damages and expenses from this week's rupture of a water storage tank could run $20 million to $25 million, city and Orange County officials said Thursday. City officials estimated total damage at $20 million. They said there is enough insurance to cover that amount. The city, though, must pay the first $350,000 in losses. To get money more quickly to families in the hard-hit, 49-unit Hefley Square condominiums, the county asked the state Thursday for $25 million in financial assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1998 | BONNIE HARRIS HAYES and JANET WILSON and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Westminster officials on Wednesday tentatively identified the weak point in a ruptured 5-million-gallon water tank as the area where the floor meets the precast concrete wall. A city engineer said the area is not in the same section of the reservoir that had shown signs of rust, cracks, rotted caulking and damaged beams during an independent inspection last year. "None of the cracks mentioned in that [inspection] report could have led to this," said Marwan Youssef, the engineer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1998 | JANET WILSON and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nine months before the rupture of a Westminster reservoir unleashed 5 million gallons of water into a neighborhood this week, an industrial inspector warned city officials that an earthquake might have damaged portions of the tank. But instead of ordering a seismic study, the city ran the inspector's findings by a second consultant, who dismissed them as "nothing to worry about."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1998 | BONNIE HARRIS HAYES and JANET WILSON and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Westminster officials on Wednesday tentatively identified the weak point in a ruptured 5-million-gallon water tank as the area where the floor meets the precast concrete wall. A city engineer said the area is not in the same section of the reservoir that had shown signs of rust, cracks, rotted caulking and damaged beams during an independent inspection last year. "None of the cracks mentioned in that [inspection] report could have led to this," said Marwan Youssef, the engineer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1998 | JANET WILSON and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nine months before the rupture of a Westminster reservoir unleashed 5 million gallons of water into a neighborhood this week, an industrial inspector warned city officials that an earthquake might have damaged portions of the tank. But instead of ordering a seismic study, the city ran the inspector's findings by a second consultant, who dismissed them as "nothing to worry about."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1998 | JANET WILSON and BONNIE HARRIS HAYES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Westminster city officials have known for at least six years that their aging pair of water tanks needed costly repairs to keep them safe, records show. Besides needing to retrofit their 5-million-gallon reservoirs against earthquake damage, repairs have been needed since at least 1992 for more than a dozen wells, upgrades that would have cost roughly $20 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1998 | BONNIE HARRIS HAYES and GREG HERNANDEZ and JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Five million gallons of water burst through an aging storage tank and slammed into a Westminster neighborhood early Monday, tossing cars and flattening garages in a disaster that former city officials said could have been avoided. Six people were injured and at least 30 left temporarily homeless after the tidal wave gushed from a 22-foot-high hole in the above-ground reservoir and rushed through a nearby fire station and the Hefley Square Town Homes. "I thought we were going to die," said Capt.
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