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BUSINESS
January 3, 2010 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
Having trouble keeping the lights on? You have plenty of company. Disconnection rates for all types of utilities have soared as an increasing number of consumers struggle with unemployment and a moribund economy. But almost all the nation's utility companies -- that's gas, electric and phones -- sponsor programs for low-income consumers that could cut rates by 20% or more. They also provide so-called "crisis grants" to cover at least a portion of past-due bills. You don't have to be destitute either.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2013 | Sandy Banks
It was a fundraiser for a venerable Crenshaw-area jazz establishment at risk of going under. But the aging musicians, outré artists and dreadlocked activists gathered to help at Leimert Park were an emblem of the venue's problems. They lined up for a turn at the mic to share their personal stories: The World Stage had inspired them to write, sing, play, create ... transforming lives, they said. They were impressively long on passion, but unfortunately short on funds. That didn't stop World Stage manager Matt Gibson from trying to rev up the crowd.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2011 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Three of California's largest utilities are asking customers to help pay for nearly $4 billion in pipeline safety projects needed after last year's deadly San Bruno disaster. Power companies and private operators across the nation are racing to improve the safety of about 150,000 miles of natural gas pipelines built before 1970 — about half of all gas transmission lines in the United States. The National Transportation Safety Board, which just completed a yearlong investigation of the San Bruno explosion, found that the older pipelines might be particularly vulnerable and in need of immediate inspection and repair.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2013 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - If you buy or own an energy-efficient house, does this make you less likely to default on your mortgage? Is there a connection between the monthly savings on utility costs and the probability that you'll pay your loan on time? A new study by the University of North Carolina suggests that the answer to both questions is a resounding yes. Using a sample of 71,000 home loans from across the country that were originated between 2002 and 2012, researchers found that mortgages on homes with Energy Star certifications were on average 32% less likely to default compared with loans on homes with no energy-efficiency improvements.
REAL ESTATE
March 17, 1996
A seminar for homeowner association directors and members on ways to cut association utility bills will be presented at 7 p.m. March 26 at the Airtel Plaza Hotel, Van Nuys, by the Greater Los Angeles chapter of Community Assns. Institute (CAI). Information: (310) 285-8286.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1998 | Nancy Rivera Brooks
The California Public Utilities Commission ordered the state's three large investor-owned utilities to rewrite part of their electric bills in an attempt to clear up the confusion over various charges listed in the revamped bills that ratepayers have been receiving since January. Specifically, Southern California Edison, San Diego Gas & Electric and Pacific Gas & Electric will be required to use a new definition for the trust transfer amount, or TTA, that is shown on electric bills.
REAL ESTATE
May 13, 2001
Under California's summer 20/20 Rebate Program, consumers who trim their utility bills by 20% will be rewarded with 20% rate cuts. Here is a partial list of things you can do to reduce energy expenses. * Lower air-conditioning costs by turning down the thermostat. Save about 3% for every one-degree adjustment. * Keep refrigerator temperature setting above 37 degrees. Replace older models with ones that have the Energy Star label. Unplug or get rid of second refrigerators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1993 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN
In an effort to achieve greater efficiency, the Glendale City Council this week authorized spending $100,000 in unappropriated funds to install a computer system for storing old water and electric utility bills. Currently, computer records of utility bills sent two to five years ago are printed on paper and stored chronologically in a room one floor below the Public Service Commercial Office in the Gene Perkins Building at the civic center. Michael P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1990
The Los Angeles City Council this week approved subsidies that could trim about $6.75 each month from utility bills of low-income residents. Water payments from disadvantaged families could be cut by $1.98 each month, power by $3.75 and sewer service by $1.02 under the plan, which must be approved by Mayor Tom Bradley. The subsidies would take effect 30 days after Bradley signs the ordinances.
WORLD
March 27, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
An ad campaign featuring billboards and commercials with images of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin was pulled after protests. The campaign in the eastern Ukraine town of Donetsk came after people stopped paying utility bills following a rate increase. In the television ad, a voice says: "Those who don't pay for their heat should be punished!"
SPORTS
March 22, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - Bill Hall, a leading candidate for a utility spot until he was sidelined by the first of two leg injuries on Feb. 27, was released by the Angels on Friday, though it's possible he could sign another minor league deal to remain in the organization. The Angels faced a Tuesday deadline to either add Hall to the 40-man roster - virtually assuring him a spot on the big-league club - or pay him a $100,000 bonus to remain in the organization. By releasing him before Tuesday, the Angels won't have to pay Hall the $100,000 bonus.
SPORTS
January 30, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
The Angels have agreed to terms with veteran utility player Bill Hall, 33, on a minor league deal with an invitation to spring training. The right-handed-hitting Hall, who can play third base, shortstop, second base and the outfield, will compete for a reserve spot with the Angels, who watched him work out Tuesday in Phoenix. But he is also open to playing at triple-A Salt Lake, which is short on right-handed bats, General Manager Jerry Dipoto said. Hall has played with six teams over the last four years and spent most of 2012 at triple-A Norfolk, where he hit .246 in 90 games, with 15 homers and 45 runs batted in. He appeared in only seven big league games for the Baltimore Orioles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles City Council members Wednesday gave enthusiastic backing to the creation of a controversial city identification card that could be used by illegal immigrants to open bank accounts, borrow library books and pay utility bills. Councilman Ed Reyes called it a way for the city's poorest workers to "come out into the light. " While the federal government has failed to pass immigration reform, the city of Los Angeles is able to manage its own affairs, said Councilman Richard Alarcon, who along with Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is a chief sponsor of the card plan.
TRAVEL
September 16, 2012 | By Sue Hobart
The Pittock Mansion, a 16,000-square-foot French Renaissance-style masterpiece, reigns atop a 1,000-foot bluff overlooking the city of Portland, Ore. With panoramic views of the Willamette and Columbia rivers and five Cascade mountains, the mansion is a testament to what power and wealth could achieve in 1914, what civic activism could restore in 1965 and what could be a killer setting for a house party in 2012. Why it's a treasure: Henry Pittock, a penniless Oregon Trail pioneer who became a land baron, lumber and paper mill magnate and owner of the Oregonian, which he built into the state's largest daily newspaper, commissioned California architect Edward T. Foulkes to create a showcase legacy for his five surviving children and their families.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Every time Bishop Robert Mallory walks into Town Hall to pay his overdue water bill and get his water turned back on, Town Clerk Dorenda Gatling asks, "House or church?" She lives just up the street from Mallory's house and across the street from his church. But that doesn't keep Gatling from cutting off town water to either one when he can't afford to pay the bills. "Ask me how that feels - a woman of faith cutting off water to the church," Gatling says, putting her head in her hands inside the cramped town clerk's office at the one-story Roper Town Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2012 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Southern California Edison and two federal agencies said Friday they are only weeks away from resolving a years-long disagreement over connecting renewable energy projects to the grid. The parties reached a preliminary agreement one week after Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) sent a letter to Edison urging the utility to end an impasse that had frustrated the government because solar projects were sitting idle long after they had been built. Utilities elsewhere in California have signed similar interconnection agreements with few problems or delays.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
When you get your utility bills each month, have you ever thought that the utility company might have made a mistake? If the answer is "no," you're not alone. Some people scour their bank statements for errors but never think to scrutinize utility bills. But that mind-set could be costly, said Larry R. Etherington, president of Utilities Auditing Services in Phoenix. Some studies have shown that as many as four out of five businesses are overcharged on utility bills, Etherington said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Starting today, residents can drop off their monthly water and sewer bill payments at a new, high-security deposit box at City Hall. The new box "will allow customers to pay their water bills without leaving their cars," City Treasurer Paul Gudgeirsson said, noting that residents often slip their payments under the door on weekends. Payments will be collected twice daily during business hours. Payments deposited in the box before 4 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2011 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Three of California's largest utilities are asking customers to help pay for nearly $4 billion in pipeline safety projects needed after last year's deadly San Bruno disaster. Power companies and private operators across the nation are racing to improve the safety of about 150,000 miles of natural gas pipelines built before 1970 — about half of all gas transmission lines in the United States. The National Transportation Safety Board, which just completed a yearlong investigation of the San Bruno explosion, found that the older pipelines might be particularly vulnerable and in need of immediate inspection and repair.
SPORTS
June 11, 2011 | From wire reports
Bill Hall was home in Arizona playing video games with his cousin when his agent called to tell him Freddy Sanchez was injured and the San Francisco Giants might need an infielder. A little over 12 hours later, Hall was in San Francisco having signed a deal with the Giants. One week after being released by last-place Houston, Hall is now in first place in the NL West with the defending World Series champions. "I felt like this was a good option," Hall said Saturday.
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