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BUSINESS
November 29, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A plan by Edison International and California regulators to keep the state's No. 2 utility out of bankruptcy will move forward while judges review the rescue settlement, a federal appeals panel ruled. Southern California Edison persuaded the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to deny a consumer group's request to freeze the rescue plan between the utility and the Public Utilities Commission. The plan will use residential rates to pay $3.3 billion in company debt.
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BUSINESS
March 23, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Two years ago, California's two giant telecom companies and their Silicon Valley allies won passage of a law freeing phone-over-the-Internet calls from government regulation. The 2012 law was essential to the creation of high-tech products and services, the industry argued. Its proposal bowled over opposition from consumer advocates. But this deregulation was never supposed to affect phone customers who didn't want to give up their traditional copper-wire land lines, the bill's author, Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima)
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BUSINESS
September 9, 2003 | Nancy Rivera Brooks
The Utility Reform Network, a San Francisco consumer advocacy group, asked the California Supreme Court for a rehearing of the high court's Aug. 21 decision upholding a rescue agreement that allowed Southern California Edison to pay off $3.6 billion in debts run up during the energy crisis. The court ruled unanimously that the California Public Utilities Commission had the authority under state law to enter into the agreement with Edison.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Ratepayers of Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. could be in line for a share of more than $1 billion in refunds as part of a possible financial settlement from the closure of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. Both Edison and another party to the negotiations, the Utility Reform Network (TURN), a consumer advocacy group, confirmed that a settlement conference is scheduled Thursday at the San Francisco headquarters of the California Public Utilities Commission.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Almost 5 million Southern California Edison Co. customers in hundreds of cities and communities across the southern, central and coastal parts of the state will be hit with higher electric bills early next year and bigger hikes in each of the following two years. The decision, which Edison says will add an average of $7 a month to residential bills for the first year, covers Edison's costs to provide service, which amounts to about half a ratepayer's bill. Other costs for buying fuel and contracting for power deliveries fluctuate and are passed directly to consumers.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Jerry Brown could have a big impact on business and residential energy bills and the California economy by making as many as three appointments this month to the state's top regulatory body, the Public Utilities Commission. At least two appointments to fill current vacancies in the five-member panel could come as early as Friday and could start to give the PUC its most pro-consumer majority since the days of the energy crisis a decade ago. A third member, Nancy Ryan, must step down Jan. 20 if her appointment last year by then- Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to a regular six-year term is not confirmed by the state Senate by then.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2010 | Marc Lifsher
California utility regulators Monday warned Pacific Gas & Electric Co. to stop using telephone and direct-mail tactics that could derail competition from the state's first nonprofit group to offer electric service. The warning letter from the California Public Utilities Commission came in the midst of PG&E's $35-million campaign to pass Proposition 16, a statewide initiative on the June 8 ballot aimed at making it harder for local governments and citizens to form nonprofits to provide electricity.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2002 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court said Wednesday that it would review whether the bailout plan that allowed Southern California Edison to help pay off its debt during the energy crisis was made in violation of the state's open-meeting law or the 1996 energy deregulation act. If the court finds that violations occurred, the rescue plan could be voided -- meaning lower rates for customers and possible refunds, according to consumer advocates.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key legislator grilled backers of Proposition 9 at a special hearing Monday, accusing proponents of the complex ballot measure of an ill-informed and misguided attempt to thwart landmark legislation that deregulated the electric utility industry. State Sen. Steve Peace (D-El Cajon), the co-author of the 1996 agreement between the Legislature and the utility industry that is the target of the initiative, told one backer that "your understanding of this is so poor . . .
BUSINESS
March 23, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Two years ago, California's two giant telecom companies and their Silicon Valley allies won passage of a law freeing phone-over-the-Internet calls from government regulation. The 2012 law was essential to the creation of high-tech products and services, the industry argued. Its proposal bowled over opposition from consumer advocates. But this deregulation was never supposed to affect phone customers who didn't want to give up their traditional copper-wire land lines, the bill's author, Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima)
BUSINESS
November 29, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Almost 5 million Southern California Edison Co. customers in hundreds of cities and communities across the southern, central and coastal parts of the state will be hit with higher electric bills early next year and bigger hikes in each of the following two years. The decision, which Edison says will add an average of $7 a month to residential bills for the first year, covers Edison's costs to provide service, which amounts to about half a ratepayer's bill. Other costs for buying fuel and contracting for power deliveries fluctuate and are passed directly to consumers.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday named a leading consumer advocate to serve on the California Public Utilities Commission, one of the state's most powerful regulatory bodies. Michael Florio, a senior attorney for the Utility Reform Network, known as TURN, was appointed to serve a five-year term. Brown also named Catherine Sandoval, a Santa Clara University law professor, telecommunications expert and former Rhodes scholar, to the five-member, constitutionally independent panel. The utilities commission oversees companies supplying electricity, natural gas, telephone and cable television service to millions of homes and businesses.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Jerry Brown could have a big impact on business and residential energy bills and the California economy by making as many as three appointments this month to the state's top regulatory body, the Public Utilities Commission. At least two appointments to fill current vacancies in the five-member panel could come as early as Friday and could start to give the PUC its most pro-consumer majority since the days of the energy crisis a decade ago. A third member, Nancy Ryan, must step down Jan. 20 if her appointment last year by then- Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to a regular six-year term is not confirmed by the state Senate by then.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2010 | Marc Lifsher
California utility regulators Monday warned Pacific Gas & Electric Co. to stop using telephone and direct-mail tactics that could derail competition from the state's first nonprofit group to offer electric service. The warning letter from the California Public Utilities Commission came in the midst of PG&E's $35-million campaign to pass Proposition 16, a statewide initiative on the June 8 ballot aimed at making it harder for local governments and citizens to form nonprofits to provide electricity.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2008 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Edison International Chairman and Chief Executive John E. Bryson, who led the utility parent through the disastrous energy market meltdown in 2000-01, will retire this summer with a pension plan and stock options that at the end of 2007 were worth almost $65 million. Bryson, who hits the company's mandatory retirement age of 65 at the end of July, isn't receiving any retirement-related payments apart from a $16.8-million pension, which can be collected in a lump sum or over time, according to a securities document filed by the company late Friday.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2003 | Nancy Rivera Brooks
The Utility Reform Network, a San Francisco consumer advocacy group, asked the California Supreme Court for a rehearing of the high court's Aug. 21 decision upholding a rescue agreement that allowed Southern California Edison to pay off $3.6 billion in debts run up during the energy crisis. The court ruled unanimously that the California Public Utilities Commission had the authority under state law to enter into the agreement with Edison.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Ratepayers of Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. could be in line for a share of more than $1 billion in refunds as part of a possible financial settlement from the closure of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. Both Edison and another party to the negotiations, the Utility Reform Network (TURN), a consumer advocacy group, confirmed that a settlement conference is scheduled Thursday at the San Francisco headquarters of the California Public Utilities Commission.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2008 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Edison International Chairman and Chief Executive John E. Bryson, who led the utility parent through the disastrous energy market meltdown in 2000-01, will retire this summer with a pension plan and stock options that at the end of 2007 were worth almost $65 million. Bryson, who hits the company's mandatory retirement age of 65 at the end of July, isn't receiving any retirement-related payments apart from a $16.8-million pension, which can be collected in a lump sum or over time, according to a securities document filed by the company late Friday.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2002 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court said Wednesday that it would review whether the bailout plan that allowed Southern California Edison to help pay off its debt during the energy crisis was made in violation of the state's open-meeting law or the 1996 energy deregulation act. If the court finds that violations occurred, the rescue plan could be voided -- meaning lower rates for customers and possible refunds, according to consumer advocates.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A plan by Edison International and California regulators to keep the state's No. 2 utility out of bankruptcy will move forward while judges review the rescue settlement, a federal appeals panel ruled. Southern California Edison persuaded the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to deny a consumer group's request to freeze the rescue plan between the utility and the Public Utilities Commission. The plan will use residential rates to pay $3.3 billion in company debt.
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