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Utility Workers Labor Relations

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the moment, an adroit exercise in bargaining-table brinkmanship has spared the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power from massive layoffs, but the real question confronting America's largest municipal utility remains unanswered: Can the city's public power system survive competition? Can an infamously bureaucratic utility nurtured in the sheltered workshop of monopoly transform itself into an agile competitor in California's emerging free market for power?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the moment, an adroit exercise in bargaining-table brinkmanship has spared the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power from massive layoffs, but the real question confronting America's largest municipal utility remains unanswered: Can the city's public power system survive competition? Can an infamously bureaucratic utility nurtured in the sheltered workshop of monopoly transform itself into an agile competitor in California's emerging free market for power?
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BUSINESS
June 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Con Edison, Union Reach Tentative Accord: The New York-based utility company and a union representing 13,000 of its workers narrowly averted a lockout with a tentative contract agreement that includes unique emergency day care for children of sick workers. The four-year pact, reached just hours before the old one was to expire at midnight Saturday, also includes lifetime monitoring for asbestos and pension improvements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1997 | DEBRA CANO
Utility workers called in sick Wednesday in an apparent job action against the city over the absence of a contract. Officials of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 47, which represents about 185 city water and electrical workers, said at least 160 employees failed to show up for work. City officials placed the number at 88 workers in the utilities department, which includes water, electric and customer service employees.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gas Co., Union Agree to Extend Negotiations: Hours before the midnight Friday expiration of their existing labor contract, Southern California Gas Co. and Local 132 of the Utility Workers Union of America agreed to continue operating under the old contract for two months while continuing talks toward a new agreement.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a highly visible campaign, the unions representing most Southern California Gas Co. employees have voted to accept a new contract that includes the provision union leaders had most hotly contested: a company proposal that could lead to the use of outside contractors to replace some full-time employees, including meter readers. Sixty percent of participating union members voted to accept the two-year contract. It includes an immediate 0.25% raise, a 2.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Protesting a proposal by Southern California Gas Co. to replace up to 1,100 of its employees with outside contractors--a move they branded a threat to customer safety--five unions struck the utility Friday. More than 2,500 union members packed a late-morning rally at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. Later, they joined as many as 1,500 others, including supporters from other unions, in a march along 5th Street between the Gas Co.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Some of the nation's 38 nuclear power plants were unable to operate because hundreds of health-physics technicians, who monitor radiation levels during reactor fueling and other activities, stayed off the job. Officials could not say just how many plants were closed; one source put the number of health-physics technicians at about 3,000. An electrical workers' union promoted the walkout to persuade contractor employers to allow a union election.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After feuding bitterly for months, Southern California Gas Co. and its unions have tentatively agreed to an innovative pact that would provide workers with substantial job security for the next 3 1/2 years. For the company, the far-reaching accord announced Tuesday would make it easier to reassign employees and in some cases to contract out work--and also provide relief from the union's contentious publicity and legal campaigns.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
For years, Southern California Gas Co.'s 470 customer service representatives--nearly all women who field phone calls in the office--had resented the fact that they were paid considerably less than the 1,100 appliance service representatives--nearly all men--who service those complaints in the field. This month, that changes.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After feuding bitterly for months, Southern California Gas Co. and its unions have tentatively agreed to an innovative pact that would provide workers with substantial job security for the next 3 1/2 years. For the company, the far-reaching accord announced Tuesday would make it easier to reassign employees and in some cases to contract out work--and also provide relief from the union's contentious publicity and legal campaigns.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a highly visible campaign, the unions representing most Southern California Gas Co. employees have voted to accept a new contract that includes the provision union leaders had most hotly contested: a company proposal that could lead to the use of outside contractors to replace some full-time employees, including meter readers. Sixty percent of participating union members voted to accept the two-year contract. It includes an immediate 0.25% raise, a 2.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Protesting a proposal by Southern California Gas Co. to replace up to 1,100 of its employees with outside contractors--a move they branded a threat to customer safety--five unions struck the utility Friday. More than 2,500 union members packed a late-morning rally at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. Later, they joined as many as 1,500 others, including supporters from other unions, in a march along 5th Street between the Gas Co.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gas Co., Union Agree to Extend Negotiations: Hours before the midnight Friday expiration of their existing labor contract, Southern California Gas Co. and Local 132 of the Utility Workers Union of America agreed to continue operating under the old contract for two months while continuing talks toward a new agreement.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Con Edison, Union Reach Tentative Accord: The New York-based utility company and a union representing 13,000 of its workers narrowly averted a lockout with a tentative contract agreement that includes unique emergency day care for children of sick workers. The four-year pact, reached just hours before the old one was to expire at midnight Saturday, also includes lifetime monitoring for asbestos and pension improvements.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
For years, Southern California Gas Co.'s 470 customer service representatives--nearly all women who field phone calls in the office--had resented the fact that they were paid considerably less than the 1,100 appliance service representatives--nearly all men--who service those complaints in the field. This month, that changes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1997 | DEBRA CANO
Utility workers called in sick Wednesday in an apparent job action against the city over the absence of a contract. Officials of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 47, which represents about 185 city water and electrical workers, said at least 160 employees failed to show up for work. City officials placed the number at 88 workers in the utilities department, which includes water, electric and customer service employees.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Some of the nation's 38 nuclear power plants were unable to operate because hundreds of health-physics technicians, who monitor radiation levels during reactor fueling and other activities, stayed off the job. Officials could not say just how many plants were closed; one source put the number of health-physics technicians at about 3,000. An electrical workers' union promoted the walkout to persuade contractor employers to allow a union election.
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