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Utopia

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HOME & GARDEN
February 6, 2010 | By Sam Watters
Remember Sir Thomas More in HBO's "The Tudors"? The good guy who had his head chopped off by Henry VIII for challenging the king's will? This scholar wrote a philosophical tale about an island called Utopia, far from England, where a fair and equitable society lived without poverty, the tyranny of a standing army and rebarbative lawyers. At times of optimistic faith in social progress, Americans have turned to the Utopian writings of More and others. Henry Thoreau, the Quakers and the Shakers were enlightened thinkers who built houses and towns as models of a perfected world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
It's as close as television can get to the "boldest, biggest" social experiment that one can imagine -- at least that's what Fox's new head of alternative entertainment promises of the network's latest reality import: "Utopia. " The network announced Thursday it's adapting the hit Dutch TV series of the same name, which comes from "Big Brother" creator John de Mol. The series takes a group of 15 everyday people and transplants them on an isolated, undeveloped location for a year and chronicles them 24/7 as they attempt to create their own civilization.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2009 | Veronique de Turenne
The ideals of Aristotle are alive and thriving in a gritty corner of Baldwin Hills. Bordered by the concrete expanse where La Brea Avenue meets Rodeo Road lies a 64-acre oasis. Its vast lawns and towering trees are rimmed by modest apartments, which, by their very nature, create community. This is Village Green, built in 1941, a celebrated example of a utopian movement in multi-family development. Based on the Radburn plan, a community idea that drew inspiration from the Garden City movement of the late 19th century, it was a revolution in urban planning.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Robert Minervini paints landscapes of disappointment, shot through with irrepressible promise. Structures are half-built, either rising or abandoned. The blank stares of empty billboards advertise a kind of existential vacancy, while twining vines spread new life. In his recent work at Marine Contemporary (the gallery's final show in its current location), the San Francisco-based painter straddles the dystopian and utopian, invoking a built environment that encompasses simultaneity and contradiction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Penny Puckett came to Slab City and fell in love. After four years of "bumming around and hopping freight trains," the 25-year-old from Kansas City arrived at this hardscrabble section of the Imperial Valley desert and immediately embraced its sense of liberation from society's rules and norms. What others might view as desolation and deprivation, Puckett saw as a way to reduce life to its essence: water, food and shelter (plus Internet and cellular phone service). PHOTOS: Slab City "Slab City people have a great need to live with just the bare necessities and are happy about it," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1990
The California Legislature passes many bills, but seldom does it pass a bill that has such potential for causing an increase in crime as Senate Bill 2557. SB 2557 allows counties to charge cities for certain services for which counties are already receiving tax money. Some counties have indicated an intent to take advantage of the bill to charge cities for booking of prisoners. If a city cannot afford to pay $183 every time a prisoner is booked, will (it) turn the prisoners loose or will they lay off policemen to get the money?
NATIONAL
July 18, 2010 | By Jenny Deam, Los Angeles Times
For almost 80 years the pretty quilt, hand-stitched from scraps of old farm clothes and backed with fabric from flour sacks bought at a local mill, had been forgotten at the bottom of a family trunk. Then one day two summers ago, an elderly couple walked into a local museum, shyly offering up the surprisingly well-preserved quilt for sale. The 90-year-old man, who had lived his whole life on the flat plains an hour north of Denver, was divvying up family heirlooms when he found the mysterious quilt.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The title "Seven Days in Utopia" might suggest a flight of metaphoric whimsy or irony, but it's as literal and earnest as everything in this inspirational drama: It refers to a week the protagonist spends in the small town of Utopia, Texas. Played by Lucas Black, he's a young golfer fresh off a humiliating pro-circuit debut, and he receives life-changing mentoring from a soulful old rancher — Robert Duvall, as a milder version of the many country-wise characters he's brought to life over the decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2000 | MARTIN BOOE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Utopia" has an ominous sound as a restaurant name. Ideological purity is bad enough in politics; in food, it could mean trouble. Will you get a menu or a manifesto? Relax. This intimate cafe-style eatery, situated in a gentrifying Long Beach neighborhood, is anything but dogmatic. The menu skips merrily--and most of the time quite gracefully--across Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, Asian and New World specialties. It's eclectic, not dogmatic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Coiled around a wind-swept hill near this city's lively Mission District, Bernal Heights takes an almost cult-like pride in being insular. With a butcher, grocer, bookstore and bakery, the neighborhood provides the basics. When you add to that some unique establishments - like an organic baby food outlet and a knife-sharpening venture offering classes in Japanese whetstone techniques - many residents say they rarely feel the urge to leave. "It's this weird little borderline utopia," said Ken Shelf, 42, who runs a combination movie-rental and succulent store here.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
At the Municipal Art Gallery in Barnsdall Park, the title of the exhibition "Lost (in L.A.)" pretty much describes how I felt when looking at its many sculptures, installations, videos and a few paintings. Thematic art exhibitions are sometimes puzzling, with the reasoning behind the general selection of artists or juxtapositions of specific works obscure, and that's certainly the case here. A subtitle could be: "Huh?" One of the more enchanting objects on display is a 1946 letter, although in the upper left corner, just above the salutation, it does sport a small, doodle-like ink drawing of an apple wearing a mask.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Coiled around a wind-swept hill near this city's lively Mission District, Bernal Heights takes an almost cult-like pride in being insular. With a butcher, grocer, bookstore and bakery, the neighborhood provides the basics. When you add to that some unique establishments - like an organic baby food outlet and a knife-sharpening venture offering classes in Japanese whetstone techniques - many residents say they rarely feel the urge to leave. "It's this weird little borderline utopia," said Ken Shelf, 42, who runs a combination movie-rental and succulent store here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Penny Puckett came to Slab City and fell in love. After four years of "bumming around and hopping freight trains," the 25-year-old from Kansas City arrived at this hardscrabble section of the Imperial Valley desert and immediately embraced its sense of liberation from society's rules and norms. What others might view as desolation and deprivation, Puckett saw as a way to reduce life to its essence: water, food and shelter (plus Internet and cellular phone service). PHOTOS: Slab City "Slab City people have a great need to live with just the bare necessities and are happy about it," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The title "Seven Days in Utopia" might suggest a flight of metaphoric whimsy or irony, but it's as literal and earnest as everything in this inspirational drama: It refers to a week the protagonist spends in the small town of Utopia, Texas. Played by Lucas Black, he's a young golfer fresh off a humiliating pro-circuit debut, and he receives life-changing mentoring from a soulful old rancher — Robert Duvall, as a milder version of the many country-wise characters he's brought to life over the decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2011
BOOKS Flavor Flav Flavor Flav loves Flavor Flav and has written a book about himself called "Flavor Flav: Icon. " The former Public Enemy rapper turned reality TV star will appear at the Grammy Museum to discuss his epic life and the many challenges he faced in the studio and behind the camera. And if you want to know what loving New York was really like, he'll be happy to tell you during the Q&A session. The Grammy Museum, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., No. A-245, L.A. 8 p.m. $20. (213)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
The Gospel of Anarchy A Novel Justin Taylor HarperPerennial: 256 pp., $13.99 paper The house at the center of Justin Taylor's "The Gospel of Anarchy" has the universals of bohemian communities: shared food, leftist politics, dropouts, some guy peeing in the yard. Yet it is also very specific ? to a place, Gainesville, Fla., and a time, 1999 ? to the degree that it has its own peculiar name: Fishgut. We come to Fishgut through David, a college student distinguished by his slow slide into isolation: He's marginally enrolled, he's just lost his anonymous call center job and he's become joylessly addicted to Internet porn.
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