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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2009 | Sandy Banks
Ronald Perkins and his neighbors were nearly outnumbered by the consultants and architects who showed up at the Jordan Downs community center. For three hours, they listened as a procession of planners depicted their home as an "island of poverty," and dissected it by "landscape character and typologies." But something puzzled Perkins as he studied the new homes that would replace their decrepit apartments. So when the tenants were asked for their opinions, he raised his hand: "How come I don't see no bars on the windows?"
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OPINION
October 29, 2013 | By Yossi Klein Halevi
Forty years ago this month, on a cold desert night, 700 Israeli paratroopers crossed the Suez Canal in rubber dinghies in a secret operation that was about to bring Israel its greatest military victory. It was the height of the Yom Kippur War, and the Jewish state had been caught in a surprise attack by Egyptian and Syrian armies. In the first chaotic days following the invasion, Israel nearly lost. Only after the paratroopers - reservists in their late 20s and early 30s - established a beachhead on the western banks of the Suez Canal did the Israeli army manage to surround Egyptian forces and win the war. The men of Paratrooper Reservist Brigade 55 had already entered Israeli history.
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OPINION
January 3, 2008
Re "How to get from here to there," Opinion, Dec. 27 Buses, rail, bicycles and monorails all have something in common -- they don't work. These suggestions contain bountiful utopian thinking, but not one good new idea. Try improving what 95% of the commuters want -- the roads. David Mootchnik Huntington Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Ernest "Chick" Callenbach, a film scholar and environmentalist who created a cult favorite in "Ecotopia," a 1975 novel that predicted with uncanny accuracy a world where recycling is commonplace, food is locally grown and energy comes from the sun, died April 16 in Berkeley. He was 83. The cause was cancer, said his wife, Christine Leefeldt. "Ecotopia" described a utopian world created by the secession of Oregon, Washington and Northern California from the United States. It takes place in 1999 when a New York newspaper reporter becomes the first American visitor since Ecotopia's founding 19 years earlier.
NEWS
April 14, 1985
NBC, please keep "St. Elsewhere," "Hill Street Blues" and "The Cosby Show" on the air. As long as the other networks keep turning out the mindless, utopian comedies and "serious dramas" packed in heavy syrup, NBC will be the only network worth watching. John Takayama, Culver City
OPINION
February 24, 2007
Re "An American in Cuba," Opinion, Feb. 21 Regarding Erin Aubry Kaplan's glowing report on Cuba's wonderful "50-year social experiment": Any word on when the government there might allow any of its experimental subjects to escape the workers' paradise? Or may we assume that they are all still held prisoner on that utopian island? NICK KLAUS Banning
OPINION
June 9, 2008
Re "A critical mass for disarmament," Opinion, June 4 Joseph Cirincione's Op-Ed article is utopian nonsense. The evidence is clear: The Iranians stopped (or sufficiently buried) their nuclear weapons program after the U.S. invasion of Iraq. They were frightened that the U.S. would enforce a nonproliferation requirement. North Korea has continually been two-faced in negotiations and has violated agreements. Could partners like this ever be trusted? It is a law of nature that the strong survive.
OPINION
March 2, 2006
Andrew L. Yarrow, in "Utopia lost" (Opinion, Feb. 25), describes the rosy forecasts about America's economic future made during the 1950s and wonders what has happened to our sense of optimism. He ignores one forecast that turned out to be correct -- geologist M. King Hubbert's prediction in 1956 that U.S. oil production would peak in the early 1970s. Hubbert was widely dismissed as an alarmist, but production in the Lower 48 states began to decline after 1970. Is it a coincidence that Americans' happiness index peaked between 1965 and 1973?
NEWS
November 17, 1989
David Larsen's article, "A Mideast Oasis of Peace," (View, Oct. 20) is a very good example of how, in this age of information and communication, we still do not know about so many important and isolated things happening around the globe. Until Larsen wrote about Neve Shalom-Oasis of Peace and informed us readers at large of its very special program in Israel, the School of Peace, I assume most of us were practically ignorant of its existence. The diversity of special articles on hidden subjects, with their important details, and the people who write them do contribute a lot to the world in which we live, in very special ways.
NEWS
August 4, 1996
"A Little Piece of Heaven in Lakewood" (July 15) about Don Waldie's new book on Lakewood highlights the precise mythology that has defined the town since its beginnings. Waldie's refusal to deal with the meaning of the Spur Posse for many young women and girls is as predictable as it is horrifying. From Lakewood's earliest days to its present incarnation, the voices of women and girls have been undervalued and demeaned. Girls, some as young as 10, were sexually assaulted. Do tell me what "piece of heaven" that provides?
WORLD
August 6, 2011 | By Batsheva Sobelman, Los Angeles Times
The camp has grown so big that it needs addresses. Debates are held at No. 199 Tent Blvd. Haircuts are on the house at Benny Zeevi's flower-decked tent, where the motto is "Life is beautiful, love will prevail. " There's even newspaper delivery, including a pile of financial papers plunked down on the sidewalk next to a tent with a "People Before Profits" sign. Photos: Tel Aviv tent town Part Woodstock, part boot camp, Tel Aviv's burgeoning protest encampment has become a small-scale experiment in a utopian society and a challenge to the established social order.
OPINION
January 14, 2011 | By Timothy Garton Ash
Wikipedia is 10 years old Saturday. It is the fifth-most-visited site on the Internet. About 400 million people use it every month. What is extraordinary about this free encyclopedia, which contains more than 17 million articles in more than 270 languages, is that it is written, edited and self-regulated almost entirely by unpaid volunteers. All the other most-visited sites are multibillion-dollar businesses; Facebook, with just 100 million more users, has been valued at $50 billion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2009 | Sandy Banks
Ronald Perkins and his neighbors were nearly outnumbered by the consultants and architects who showed up at the Jordan Downs community center. For three hours, they listened as a procession of planners depicted their home as an "island of poverty," and dissected it by "landscape character and typologies." But something puzzled Perkins as he studied the new homes that would replace their decrepit apartments. So when the tenants were asked for their opinions, he raised his hand: "How come I don't see no bars on the windows?"
OPINION
October 21, 2008 | Claire Berlinski, Claire Berlinski is the author of "There is No Alternative: Why Margaret Thatcher Matters."
The free-market system, it is now fashionable to say, is to blame for the current financial crisis. By way of rejoinder, a growing cohort of commentators have argued that the crisis should be understood not as a failure of free-market economic theory but as its vindication. They argue that the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2008 | Mark Lamster, Mark Lamster is writing a book on the secret political career of Peter Paul Rubens
On a fall afternoon in 1845, 800 members of the Tropical Emigration Society gathered on a field outside Oxford, England, to see their future in action. Specifically, they were there to see the prototype of a great machine -- "The Satellite," they called it -- that promised to generate "infinite wealth" and reinvent society.
OPINION
June 9, 2008
Re "A critical mass for disarmament," Opinion, June 4 Joseph Cirincione's Op-Ed article is utopian nonsense. The evidence is clear: The Iranians stopped (or sufficiently buried) their nuclear weapons program after the U.S. invasion of Iraq. They were frightened that the U.S. would enforce a nonproliferation requirement. North Korea has continually been two-faced in negotiations and has violated agreements. Could partners like this ever be trusted? It is a law of nature that the strong survive.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1986 | COLIN GARDNER
Scot Heywood is a Los Angeles artist who paints interlocking, three-panel abstracts in various combinations of black and white. He explores elements of composition, internal structural divisions, spatial parameters and the complex interplay of surface texture and sheen. Such geometric abstraction owes obvious historical debts to the Utopian visions of the Russian Supremacist and Constructivist movements, as well as the later formal experiments of Ad Reinhardt.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1997 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the deceptively simple face of it, Ben Nicholson's unexpectedly juicy exhibition at Woodbury University appears to be an exaggerated computer-aided vision of suburban architecture. It resembles a Utopian fantasy along the lines of Disneyland's "House of Tomorrow," circa the late 1990s. But, that's not the half of it. Nicholson is less interested in concrete, realistic possibilities than conceptual trains of thought, and that's the real subject of his show.
OPINION
January 3, 2008
Re "How to get from here to there," Opinion, Dec. 27 Buses, rail, bicycles and monorails all have something in common -- they don't work. These suggestions contain bountiful utopian thinking, but not one good new idea. Try improving what 95% of the commuters want -- the roads. David Mootchnik Huntington Beach
BOOKS
October 28, 2007 | Michael Joseph Gross, Michael Joseph Gross is the author of "Starstruck: When a Fan Gets Close to Fame."
Black Mass Apocalyptic Religion and the Death of Utopia John Gray Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 244 pp., $24 Straw Dogs Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals John Gray Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 248 pp., $16 paper -- This might be the most important question you can ask about the presidential candidates: Can they talk to the animals?
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