Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUttar Pradesh
IN THE NEWS

Uttar Pradesh

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
July 27, 2008 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
What DO we make of Evan S. Connell? In the course of a more-than-50-year career, he has written fiction, essays, biography and even two book-length poems, "Notes From a Bottle Found on the Beach at Carmel" and "Points for a Compass Rose." His paired novels, "Mrs. Bridge" and "Mr. Bridge," remain among the most insightful portraits of 20th century middle-American suburban life ever written; his biography of Gen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - It began in the smallest of ways, when a teenage Hindu girl complained to her family that she'd been verbally harassed by a Muslim boy. The girl's brother and cousin allegedly responded by going to the teenage boy's home and shooting him to death. Reacting to that, members of his family and others in the Muslim community allegedly beat to death the brother and cousin. From that spark in late August, violence in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh has escalated, with the death toll reaching 31 on Monday as police locked down the area and the prime minister called for calm.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 8, 1995 | RANJAN ROY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Huddled with 14 women under the shady canopy of a neem tree, Shenaz Parveen conspires: "Don't tell your husbands about the pill." Brushing off flies swarming in from a swampy yard where buffalos are tethered, Parveen tells the women of Maikapur village that they can begin to control their lives--a seditious idea in male-dominated India. Thousands of young women like her have fanned out across Uttar Pradesh state as part of a U.S.-financed project to control population growth.
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI -- The death toll from sectarian violence in India's northern Uttar Pradesh state increased to 31 Monday as police locked down the area and the prime minister called for calm. A curfew has been imposed, about 13,000 security officers have been deployed to the area and over 100 people were arrested on charges of inciting violence. Schools and shops were closed Monday after hundreds of villagers reportedly fled their homes Sunday or were evacuated by police. Tensions were sparked in late August when a teenage Hindu girl complained to her family that she'd been verbally harassed by a Muslim boy, also a teenager, in another village in Muzaffarnagar district, located in the northern part of India's most populous state, according to local media reports.
NEWS
September 22, 1985 | From Reuters
At least 143 people have been killed in heavy rains and floods sweeping through India's northern Uttar Pradesh state during the current monsoon season, the Press Trust of India reported Friday.
NEWS
October 15, 1985 | Associated Press
An outbreak of encephalitis has claimed 79 lives in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, India's most populous, the Indian Express newspaper reported. Encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain and spinal cord. For many forms, there is no treatment.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | From Times wire services
An express train jumped the tracks in central India today, killing at least 35 people and injuring more than 100. Many of the injured were in critical condition, the Press Trust of India reported. A Central Railway spokesman said 12 cars of the New Delhi-bound Karnataka Express derailed near Jhansi in Uttar Pradesh state. He said the death toll could climb.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | From Reuters
At least 32 more people were killed Thursday in religious strife across India over a militant Hindu campaign to build a temple where a mosque now stands, domestic news agencies said. "More blood may spill before there is peace," said Mulayam Singh Yadav, chief minister of Uttar Pradesh state, who has organized the defense of the mosque in the town of Ayodhya. Fourteen people were killed Thursday in Uttar Pradesh and seven in Gujarat.
WORLD
January 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Two assailants with guns and grenades ambushed a police recruitment center in Rampur, India, killing seven officers and a civilian, a police official said. The slain officers belonged to a special force created to fight insurgents, said Brij Lal, a senior police official in the state of Uttar Pradesh. Police did not say which group they suspected, but in the past authorities have blamed violence in the region on militants trying to spark unrest between India's Hindu majority and its Muslim minority.
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI -- The death toll from sectarian violence in India's northern Uttar Pradesh state increased to 31 Monday as police locked down the area and the prime minister called for calm. A curfew has been imposed, about 13,000 security officers have been deployed to the area and over 100 people were arrested on charges of inciting violence. Schools and shops were closed Monday after hundreds of villagers reportedly fled their homes Sunday or were evacuated by police. Tensions were sparked in late August when a teenage Hindu girl complained to her family that she'd been verbally harassed by a Muslim boy, also a teenager, in another village in Muzaffarnagar district, located in the northern part of India's most populous state, according to local media reports.
WORLD
November 20, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Priyanshi Srivastava, a second-year student at the Footwear Development Design Institute here in Amethi, was quite taken with lawmaker Rahul Gandhi during his recent visit to the institute that he helped start. "I never expected he'd have such a deep knowledge about leather goods," Srivastava said of the scion of India's most famous political family. "And I never thought he'd be so damned handsome. " As campaigning for legislative assembly seats in the north-central state of Uttar Pradesh kicked off last week, Gandhi may hope other voters in India's most populous state have the same reaction.
WORLD
June 26, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Scientists, health workers and community outreach officials in India believe they're finally on the cusp of a major milestone, the defeat of polio throughout the country. The polio virus, which attacks the nervous system, has been largely eliminated in most other countries through immunizations. But it has remained a frustratingly significant threat in India, as well as in Nigeria, Afghanistan and Pakistan, largely because of unsanitary conditions. It wasn't too long ago that polio killed or crippled 100,000 children in India each year.
WORLD
April 1, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
India's population is now more than 1.2 billion, an increase of 181 million in a decade, putting it on course to surpass China as the world's most populous nation sometime after 2030, according to preliminary census results released Thursday. Though India's population growth rate slowed significantly to 17.6% over the last decade, putting it on target to double in size in about 50 years, the nation added almost enough people to match the biggest country in South America. "We have added almost one Brazil to our population in the last one decade," C. Chandramouli, India's census commissioner, told reporters Thursday.
WORLD
December 12, 2009 | By Mark Magnier
The surprise announcement this week that India would create a new state has sparked what advocates of the status quo have long feared: a host of other regions clamoring for statehood. The catalyst for the decision to create the new state of Telangana out of southern Andhra Pradesh state was an 11-day fast by a struggling regional politician who had vowed to starve himself to death if India didn't redraw the map. The all but desperate move by K. Chandrasekhar Rao was meant to evoke the strategic fasts of the last century by Mohandas Gandhi, father of modern India, to protest British colonial oppression and contain religious violence.
BOOKS
July 27, 2008 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
What DO we make of Evan S. Connell? In the course of a more-than-50-year career, he has written fiction, essays, biography and even two book-length poems, "Notes From a Bottle Found on the Beach at Carmel" and "Points for a Compass Rose." His paired novels, "Mrs. Bridge" and "Mr. Bridge," remain among the most insightful portraits of 20th century middle-American suburban life ever written; his biography of Gen.
WORLD
January 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Two assailants with guns and grenades ambushed a police recruitment center in Rampur, India, killing seven officers and a civilian, a police official said. The slain officers belonged to a special force created to fight insurgents, said Brij Lal, a senior police official in the state of Uttar Pradesh. Police did not say which group they suspected, but in the past authorities have blamed violence in the region on militants trying to spark unrest between India's Hindu majority and its Muslim minority.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their ancestors were ordered by religious edict to live in hovels away from other people, to eat only from broken dishes and to wear ornaments of black iron. For its meticulous inhumanity, the brand of apartheid the "untouchables" of India were subjected to for centuries may have no parallel anywhere else in the world. In some regions, even standing downwind from them was considered to be ritually polluting.
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - It began in the smallest of ways, when a teenage Hindu girl complained to her family that she'd been verbally harassed by a Muslim boy. The girl's brother and cousin allegedly responded by going to the teenage boy's home and shooting him to death. Reacting to that, members of his family and others in the Muslim community allegedly beat to death the brother and cousin. From that spark in late August, violence in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh has escalated, with the death toll reaching 31 on Monday as police locked down the area and the prime minister called for calm.
NEWS
February 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
Bloody political clashes marred voting Sunday in India's parliamentary elections, which took place amid another distraction--the sudden collapse of the government in the country's most populous state. Twelve people were killed in factional violence. Nearly 40 others were injured across the nine states that voted. The turnout was 55%, slightly below average, on the second day of a six-day election, which completed voting for three-fourths of the 543 districts at stake.
NEWS
October 8, 1995 | DAVID BRISCOE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Advocates of foreign aid like to point out that each American's share is just enough to buy three large pizzas--about $45 a year. Opponents say even that is a waste of tax dollars and that unending poverty in longtime client countries of Africa, Latin America and Asia proves U.S. aid programs have not worked. By the time the budget-cutting Republican Congress gets through with President Clinton's aid proposals, the share of national wealth going into aid will sink to a half-century low.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|