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Uwanuda Kagura Troupe

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August 26, 1990 | Larry B. Richards, Richards is currently in the master's program at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, majoring in ethnomusicology
These days Tokyo might leave a visitor with the impression that Japan's native folk performing arts have mostly been supplanted by those of the West. Night life offers everything from bluegrass to Beethoven. But ancient traditions are alive and well in modern Japan, if not so much in Tokyo, in more provincial areas, thanks to "hozonkai," or preservation societies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | Larry B. Richards, Richards is currently in the master's program at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, majoring in ethnomusicology
These days Tokyo might leave a visitor with the impression that Japan's native folk performing arts have mostly been supplanted by those of the West. Night life offers everything from bluegrass to Beethoven. But ancient traditions are alive and well in modern Japan, if not so much in Tokyo, in more provincial areas, thanks to "hozonkai," or preservation societies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER
A huge, gilded dragon, looped to the gills on home-grown sake, writhed and rolled, belching columns of smoke and fireworks, as his four heads fought over who would get the last drop of the magic sauce. That was the set-piece moment in the dance-drama "Yamata-no-orochi" (The Eight-Headed, Eight-Tailed Dragon), presented Thursday night at L.A. Arboretum by the Uwanuda Kagura troupe from Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES
With flowing arm movements but with hands stretched rigid, fingers quivering, the Children of Bali made a ceremonial entrance down the middle of the sold-out audience seating area at the Sunset Canyon Recreation Center on Friday. The troupe, made up of dancers age 10-15, appeared dressed in simmering greens, golds and oranges, wearing golden aprons, peaked helmets or headdresses crowned with flowers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Festival is going ahead with plans to move seven performing events--including the Court Performers from the Yogyakarta Palace of Java, widely viewed as the centerpiece of the festival--from downtown's Embassy Theater to a two-acre outdoor site at Arcadia's State and County Arboretum, despite the lack of signed contracts. Although tickets for the Embassy programs affected by the switch have been on sale for a month, L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arcadia residents whose properties adjoin the L.A. State and County Arboretum have not been notified that the Los Angeles Festival plans to hold an all-night performance by a 67-member Javanese dance company in their back yards, even though the city of Arcadia and the arboretum have sought neighbors' approval in the past for events running later than 10 p.m. And while the San Gabriel Valley city has yet to formally approve the Sept. 8 event, hundreds of tickets have already been sold.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | SALLI STEVENSON
The Los Angeles Festival lists the Majikina Honryu Dance Company under the theme of "Tending the Flame." The basic question is: Whose flame--Okinawa's or Japan's? The answer is complex because it's really a blend. "The Japanese used to consider Okinawans second-class citizens--peasants, mongrels," said company manager Heather Matsunaga, "because we were not pure Japanese." That attitude continued, along with Japanese rule, until just after World War II, she said.
OPINION
September 23, 1990 | Maureen A. Kindel, Maureen A. Kindel, president of the public-affairs consulting firm of Rose & Kindel, is board chairwoman of the 1990 Los Angeles Festival.
A great deal was written and said about the just-completed Los Angeles Festival. Some hailed the arts celebration as a huge success and a groundbreaking event. Others complained that the festival's brochure bewildered them, dampening their interest. Without a doubt, the 1990 Los Angeles Festival was a triumph. Indeed, a page in the cultural and racial history of the city has been turned. As planned, 290 events, 70% free, were presented at more than 70 venues across the city.
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