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July 29, 2012 | By Diane Pucin
LONDON -- Luiza Galiulina, a 20-year-old female gymnast from Uzbekistan, was provisionally suspended from the Olympics on Sunday after she failed a doping test. Galiulina's "A" sample, taken Wednesday, tested positive for a banned diuretic, furosemide. She was told in a Saturday evening hearing about the failed test. Galiulina's "B" sample is scheduled to be tested later Sunday afternoon. Her greatest gymnastics accomplishment was winning a balance beam bronze medal during the 2010 Asian Games.
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OPINION
August 15, 2012 | By Sanjar Umarov
Not long after I spoke out against a massacre of mostly peaceful protesters in Uzbekistan in 2005, I was arrested by government security services and taken away. I was drugged, beaten, falsely accused of directing the uprising, charged with financial crimes and sentenced to 14 1/2 years in prison. There I was put to work in a brick factory, and my health deteriorated. During the brutally cold January of 2008, as a punishment for political prisoners, three other inmates and I were put for five freezing days in the "monkey cage" - an unheated, open-air cell - wearing only T-shirts and pants.
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OPINION
August 15, 2012 | By Sanjar Umarov
Not long after I spoke out against a massacre of mostly peaceful protesters in Uzbekistan in 2005, I was arrested by government security services and taken away. I was drugged, beaten, falsely accused of directing the uprising, charged with financial crimes and sentenced to 14 1/2 years in prison. There I was put to work in a brick factory, and my health deteriorated. During the brutally cold January of 2008, as a punishment for political prisoners, three other inmates and I were put for five freezing days in the "monkey cage" - an unheated, open-air cell - wearing only T-shirts and pants.
NEWS
August 4, 2012 | By Leon Legothetis
I ask not for a lighter burden, but for broader shoulders.   --Jewish proverb The drive from Uzbekistan to Kazakhstan was abruptly curtailed when I arrived at the wrong border crossing. The crossing was closed for repairs and there was supposedly another one about 60 miles away. The only sticking point: I had no idea how to get there. Fortunately for me, an Uzbekistan stranger did. However, he wanted to be paid for his services. 200,000 som to be precise. I didn't have 200,000 som (about $100)
SPORTS
August 1, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
LONDON -- A gymnast from Uzbekistan has become the second athlete to be expelled from the London Olympics for doping, after a follow-up urine test confirmed a positive finding on her initial screening. The International Olympic Committee, which had provisionally suspended Luiza Galiulina after the first positive result, announced Wednesday that it had revoked her credential and had referred her case file to the International Gymnastics Federation for possible addition sanctions. Galiulina, who wasn't a medal contender, provided a urine sample on July 25 that tested positive for the banned substance furosemide, a diuretic, officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Back in 2000, USC film professor Amanda Pope and a former student, Tchavdar Georgiev, were traveling in Russia and some of its satellites, working on a series of short portraits of emerging leaders in the post-Soviet world. The two were in Uzbekistan when Pope heard about an amazing collection of Russian avant-garde art in a remote museum deep in the country's desert. But when she excitedly mentioned it to Georgiev, a native of Ukraine who speaks fluent Russian, he was skeptical.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | Reuters
China and newly independent Uzbekistan have established full diplomatic relations, the official New China News Agency said Friday. It was the second member of the new Commonwealth of Independent States to establish full ties with China.
OPINION
August 9, 2004
You state the case for greater reform in Uzbekistan and the U.S. need to curtail support for the Islam Karimov government with aplomb (editorial, Aug. 4). It's among the most informed editorials that I've read. Unfortunately, there are a couple of factors that probably will prevent Uzbekistan from reforming while terrorists operate in the country. First, the regime thinks it is locked in a death struggle with international terrorism, and it thinks that only the most brutal response will work in defeating terrorist groups.
TRAVEL
October 6, 1985 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
"You paid much to see our exotics, so don't complain. You are going to see our exotics." Our Intourist guide, Natasha, as dryly humorous as she was dutifully propagandistic, was making light of our aim to see Uzbekistan, the ancient region near Afghanistan and China's Xinjiang province and now the Uzbek Socialist Soviet Republic. Natasha, of course, was right. To us, Uzbekistan meant pure exotica.
OPINION
July 14, 2004
Re "After Soviets, Silk Road Nations Look to a More Glorious Past," July 11: While you covered the Muslim community and its resurgence in the article, you overlooked the decimation of one of the oldest Jewish communities in the world. The Jewish community of Uzbekistan numbered 100,000 in 1980. There were thriving synagogues in Samarkand, Bukhara and Tashkent as recently as 1990. My family dates back several hundred years in Uzbekistan. When I visited in 1989, madrasas -- which had been closed for years -- were being reopened by imams sent from Iran.
SPORTS
August 1, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
LONDON -- A gymnast from Uzbekistan has become the second athlete to be expelled from the London Olympics for doping, after a follow-up urine test confirmed a positive finding on her initial screening. The International Olympic Committee, which had provisionally suspended Luiza Galiulina after the first positive result, announced Wednesday that it had revoked her credential and had referred her case file to the International Gymnastics Federation for possible addition sanctions. Galiulina, who wasn't a medal contender, provided a urine sample on July 25 that tested positive for the banned substance furosemide, a diuretic, officials said.
SPORTS
July 29, 2012 | By Diane Pucin
LONDON -- Luiza Galiulina, a 20-year-old female gymnast from Uzbekistan, was provisionally suspended from the Olympics on Sunday after she failed a doping test. Galiulina's "A" sample, taken Wednesday, tested positive for a banned diuretic, furosemide. She was told in a Saturday evening hearing about the failed test. Galiulina's "B" sample is scheduled to be tested later Sunday afternoon. Her greatest gymnastics accomplishment was winning a balance beam bronze medal during the 2010 Asian Games.
FOOD
September 23, 2011 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Thirteen years ago, when Ruben Mkrtchyan told his wife and four children that they were going to move from Glendale to a high desert valley in the middle of nowhere to grow the world's tastiest melons, they thought he had lost his mind. "My mom and I looked at each other and said, 'What is he talking about?' " recalls his daughter Tatevik. "When we went up there, the land was completely empty, just Joshua trees and scrub. " But Mkrtchyan had a vision of fields and orchards blooming in the wilderness, one that he has realized to a remarkable extent.
SPORTS
June 20, 2011 | By Diane Pucin
For a change, Venus Williams will get to be the young one. Williams, 31, served seven aces and generally played big, powerful, wise grass-court tennis befitting a five-time Wimbledon champion, in defeating Akgul Amanmuradova of Uzbekistan, 6-3, 6-1, in her opener Monday. For her efforts, Williams earned a second-round match against Japan's Kimiko Date-Krumm. Date-Krumm, 40, became the second-oldest woman to win a Wimbledon match when she beat Britain's Katie O'Brien, 6-0, 7-5. One of the younger American players in the draw had a redemptive performance Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Back in 2000, USC film professor Amanda Pope and a former student, Tchavdar Georgiev, were traveling in Russia and some of its satellites, working on a series of short portraits of emerging leaders in the post-Soviet world. The two were in Uzbekistan when Pope heard about an amazing collection of Russian avant-garde art in a remote museum deep in the country's desert. But when she excitedly mentioned it to Georgiev, a native of Ukraine who speaks fluent Russian, he was skeptical.
FOOD
September 9, 2010 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In California, melons are a highlight of the summer breakfast table. In Central Asia, they are a cultural obsession. And that has made for some interesting cross-pollination. In Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and China's Xinjiang region, hundreds of varieties ripen to perfection in the region's hot, dry summers, producing ultra-sweet, luscious fruits with unexpected flavors such as gardenia and vanilla. Melons overflow the bazaars and are piled by the roadsides. They are celebrated with special holidays; consumed for their medicinal properties; cooked, dried and even stored for the winter in special melon houses.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | From Reuters
Six senior Communist Party members have been fired in the Soviet republic of Uzbekistan, where a rash of corruption-related dismissals has already been reported over the last year. According to Friday's edition of the regional party daily Pravda Vostoka (Pravda of the East), which reached Moscow on Tuesday, five members of the republic's Central Committee were fired for "misdeeds and actions incompatible with their position."
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
Troops have seized thousands of weapons since a curfew was imposed nearly two weeks ago to quell ethnic violence in Uzbekistan, and the death toll rose with the discovery of two more bodies, Tass reported Friday. Tass, the official news agency, said troops had confiscated 157 firearms, knives and bayonets as well as 26 firebombs during road checks in the last 24 hours. A total of 7,718 weapons have now been confiscated. Meanwhile, the remains of two people were discovered and added to the list of at least 100 victims, Tass said.
WORLD
June 15, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
The number of dead from ethnic rioting in Kyrgyzstan "should be multiplied several times" from the official toll of 176, said interim President Roza Otunbayeva, as tens of thousands of people fled to neighboring Uzbekistan and thousands more remained trapped Tuesday after that border was closed. Although the violence appeared to subside Tuesday, Otunbayeva said she was negotiating with Russian leaders to deploy Russian troops to the conflict zone in the country's south because the Kyrgyz army and police are unable to maintain order.
OPINION
September 25, 2009 | Tom Harkin, Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) is chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee and a longtime leader in the fight to end abusive child labor around the globe.
As youngsters in the United States return to school, children in Uzbekistan will be returning to the fields. For them, it is the autumn cotton harvest. From now through the end of November, instead of attending classes, 2 million Uzbek children ages 6 to 15 will be forced to spend their days picking cotton. Unlike most instances of forced child labor in agriculture, this mass mobilization is not driven by exploitative plantation owners or desperate families but by the government.
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