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NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, so he built towers of human skulls from Baghdad to New Delhi. If Soviet history portrayed Tamerlane as nothing but a bloodthirsty conqueror, so what? In this long-forgotten capital of his 14th and early 15th century empire, history can be--and is being--rewritten. Tamerlane is back--on equestrian statues proclaiming "My Strength Is in Justice." In a bizarre revival, post-Soviet Uzbekistan has repackaged the Mongol tyrant as an enlightened prince and national role model.
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NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, so he built towers of human skulls from Baghdad to New Delhi. If Soviet history portrayed Tamerlane as nothing but a bloodthirsty conqueror, so what? In this long-forgotten capital of his 14th and early 15th century empire, history can be--and is being--rewritten. Tamerlane is back--on equestrian statues proclaiming "My Strength Is in Justice." In a bizarre revival, post-Soviet Uzbekistan has repackaged the Mongol tyrant as an enlightened prince and national role model.
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NEWS
June 3, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As far as Makhbube Ashurova is concerned, it was emancipation that sent her mother to an early grave. The 20-year-old teaching student recalls a woman who rose before the sun to prepare the day's bread for her husband and seven children, then tended a courtyard garden before setting off for the factory to do her part in the Soviet drive for industrial prowess. At night, Ashurova recalls, her mother cooked, fed the children, then served her husband, his parents and his friends.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander Chaichenko was up at 4 a.m., long before the sun revealed the flat, boundless steppe. He spent the morning rebuilding a tractor from old parts. Then he gathered seeds for the new planting season. Late into evening he was pouring a concrete floor for a barn. Six decades after Stalin forced his grandparents onto a Soviet collective, Chaichenko is working harder than ever--for himself. He produces nearly twice as much wheat per acre as the state farm he abandoned three years ago.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander Chaichenko was up at 4 a.m., long before the sun revealed the flat, boundless steppe. He spent the morning rebuilding a tractor from old parts. Then he gathered seeds for the new planting season. Late into evening he was pouring a concrete floor for a barn. Six decades after Stalin forced his grandparents onto a Soviet collective, Chaichenko is working harder than ever--for himself. He produces nearly twice as much wheat per acre as the state farm he abandoned three years ago.
NEWS
June 3, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As far as Makhbube Ashurova is concerned, it was emancipation that sent her mother to an early grave. The 20-year-old teaching student recalls a woman who rose before the sun to prepare the day's bread for her husband and seven children, then tended a courtyard garden before setting off for the factory to do her part in the Soviet drive for industrial prowess. At night, Ashurova recalls, her mother cooked, fed the children, then served her husband, his parents and his friends.
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