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NEWS
September 21, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this remote Asian corner of the crumbling Soviet empire, the longest line at the Alayski Market was not for bread, or meat, or even vodka. All of these were well stocked on the counters of the sprawling open-air vendor stands nearby. The line that snaked for 30 feet or more was for pigs' ears. "Hey, get out of there! I've been waiting on this line for two hours!" shouted a Russian in the line who later identified himself as Gennady.
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NEWS
June 20, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legend has it that the powerful emir of Bukhara, desperate to have a son, came to this desert village hundreds of years ago to visit a woman famous for her fertility. The emir, following the superstition of the day, sat under her dress for several minutes, according to the legend. Returning to his walled city, he was soon blessed with a son he named Shakh Murad. The village took the same name, and when the prince became emir, he exempted the village from taxes forever.
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NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander Chaichenko was up at 4 a.m., long before the sun revealed the flat, boundless steppe. He spent the morning rebuilding a tractor from old parts. Then he gathered seeds for the new planting season. Late into evening he was pouring a concrete floor for a barn. Six decades after Stalin forced his grandparents onto a Soviet collective, Chaichenko is working harder than ever--for himself. He produces nearly twice as much wheat per acre as the state farm he abandoned three years ago.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old man roams what used to be the floor of the Aral Sea, coaxing a ram, a goat and a cow in search of food in what is now relentless desert. Not far away is the rusting hull of the fishing boat that three decades ago he sailed high above, on the surface of bountiful waters. The marooned wreck stands askew amid a ghostly fleet anchored in salty dunes. Stopping his tiny herd in a patch of desert grass, he encounters a stranger who inquires about the sea.
NEWS
June 20, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legend has it that the powerful emir of Bukhara, desperate to have a son, came to this desert village hundreds of years ago to visit a woman famous for her fertility. The emir, following the superstition of the day, sat under her dress for several minutes, according to the legend. Returning to his walled city, he was soon blessed with a son he named Shakh Murad. The village took the same name, and when the prince became emir, he exempted the village from taxes forever.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old man roams what used to be the floor of the Aral Sea, coaxing a ram, a goat and a cow in search of food in what is now relentless desert. Not far away is the rusting hull of the fishing boat that three decades ago he sailed high above, on the surface of bountiful waters. The marooned wreck stands askew amid a ghostly fleet anchored in salty dunes. Stopping his tiny herd in a patch of desert grass, he encounters a stranger who inquires about the sea.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander Chaichenko was up at 4 a.m., long before the sun revealed the flat, boundless steppe. He spent the morning rebuilding a tractor from old parts. Then he gathered seeds for the new planting season. Late into evening he was pouring a concrete floor for a barn. Six decades after Stalin forced his grandparents onto a Soviet collective, Chaichenko is working harder than ever--for himself. He produces nearly twice as much wheat per acre as the state farm he abandoned three years ago.
NEWS
September 21, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this remote Asian corner of the crumbling Soviet empire, the longest line at the Alayski Market was not for bread, or meat, or even vodka. All of these were well stocked on the counters of the sprawling open-air vendor stands nearby. The line that snaked for 30 feet or more was for pigs' ears. "Hey, get out of there! I've been waiting on this line for two hours!" shouted a Russian in the line who later identified himself as Gennady.
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