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Uzbekistan Elections

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NEWS
December 30, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh fighting broke out in the Georgian capital of Tbilisi on Sunday when supporters of President Zviad Gamsakhurdia attempted to lift a rebel siege of the republic's Parliament. Gamsakhurdia continued to defy demands for his resignation.
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NEWS
January 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Incumbent President Islam Karimov overwhelmingly won election to a second term in Uzbekistan, Central Asia's most populous nation, according to initial results. Karimov, Uzbekistan's leader since 1990, took 91.9% of the vote, the Central Election Commission said. Karimov had been expected to easily win; even his only opponent, Abdulkhafiz Dzhalalov, acknowledged that he had voted for the incumbent. Final results will be announced later this month.
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NEWS
January 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Incumbent President Islam Karimov overwhelmingly won election to a second term in Uzbekistan, Central Asia's most populous nation, according to initial results. Karimov, Uzbekistan's leader since 1990, took 91.9% of the vote, the Central Election Commission said. Karimov had been expected to easily win; even his only opponent, Abdulkhafiz Dzhalalov, acknowledged that he had voted for the incumbent. Final results will be announced later this month.
NEWS
December 30, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh fighting broke out in the Georgian capital of Tbilisi on Sunday when supporters of President Zviad Gamsakhurdia attempted to lift a rebel siege of the republic's Parliament. Gamsakhurdia continued to defy demands for his resignation.
OPINION
February 27, 2000 | Paula R. Newberg, Paula R. Newberg has lived and worked in south, central and west Asia, and visited Kyrygzstan prior to its parliamentary elections on behalf of the National Democratic Institute
Last week's election in Kyrgyzstan began a long battle for the soul of democracy in Central Asia. Spurning the efforts of President Askar A. Akayev to eliminate political opposition, Kyrgyz voters supported an increasingly embattled democratic pluralism. But by driving a political wedge between the government and the electorate, Akayev is also testing the West.
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