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NEWS
June 14, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bahodyr Abdullayev, a devout Muslim, was arrested here in February after police found six bullets stuffed in a hole in the wall of his home. Relatives say the police had no problem finding the bullets because the officers themselves put them there--borrowing a screwdriver from Abdullayev's son to make the hole. Abdullayev was tortured in jail until he falsely confessed to belonging to a banned Islamic party, family members say.
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NEWS
June 14, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bahodyr Abdullayev, a devout Muslim, was arrested here in February after police found six bullets stuffed in a hole in the wall of his home. Relatives say the police had no problem finding the bullets because the officers themselves put them there--borrowing a screwdriver from Abdullayev's son to make the hole. Abdullayev was tortured in jail until he falsely confessed to belonging to a banned Islamic party, family members say.
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NEWS
September 21, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this remote Asian corner of the crumbling Soviet empire, the longest line at the Alayski Market was not for bread, or meat, or even vodka. All of these were well stocked on the counters of the sprawling open-air vendor stands nearby. The line that snaked for 30 feet or more was for pigs' ears. "Hey, get out of there! I've been waiting on this line for two hours!" shouted a Russian in the line who later identified himself as Gennady.
NEWS
January 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Incumbent President Islam Karimov overwhelmingly won election to a second term in Uzbekistan, Central Asia's most populous nation, according to initial results. Karimov, Uzbekistan's leader since 1990, took 91.9% of the vote, the Central Election Commission said. Karimov had been expected to easily win; even his only opponent, Abdulkhafiz Dzhalalov, acknowledged that he had voted for the incumbent. Final results will be announced later this month.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, so he built towers of human skulls from Baghdad to New Delhi. If Soviet history portrayed Tamerlane as nothing but a bloodthirsty conqueror, so what? In this long-forgotten capital of his 14th and early 15th century empire, history can be--and is being--rewritten. Tamerlane is back--on equestrian statues proclaiming "My Strength Is in Justice." In a bizarre revival, post-Soviet Uzbekistan has repackaged the Mongol tyrant as an enlightened prince and national role model.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | Steven Gutterman, a researcher in The Times' Moscow Bureau.
As the Commonwealth of Independent States rises on the ruins of the Soviet Union, who will be its most important figures? Here are some of the VIPs taking charge of the new, post-Soviet world: BORIS NIKOLAYEVICH YELTSIN Age: 60 Position: President of Russia Background: Graduated from Ural Polytechnic Institute in 1955 . . . spent 30 years in hometown of Sverdlovsk, western Siberia, before coming to Moscow in 1985 as chief of Communist Party Central Committee's construction department.
NEWS
January 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Incumbent President Islam Karimov overwhelmingly won election to a second term in Uzbekistan, Central Asia's most populous nation, according to initial results. Karimov, Uzbekistan's leader since 1990, took 91.9% of the vote, the Central Election Commission said. Karimov had been expected to easily win; even his only opponent, Abdulkhafiz Dzhalalov, acknowledged that he had voted for the incumbent. Final results will be announced later this month.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | From Associated Press
The legislatures of Georgia and Uzbekistan took cautious steps toward sovereignty on Wednesday but followed a different path than the one blazed by the Baltic republics. These were the latest challenges to face President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who has been offering greater autonomy in an effort to persuade the Soviet Union's increasingly restive republics to remain within the fold.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is launching a new initiative in Central Asia, one of the last frontiers for U.S. foreign policy and one of the most problematic. Four of the region's five republics are the last bastions of unrepentant Communist rule in the new Commonwealth of Independent States. They are also the most impoverished and in need of outside help.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presidents of five Soviet Central Asian republics agreed Friday that they will join the Commonwealth of Independent States proclaimed by the leaders of the old Soviet Union's big-three Slavic republics. Their action heightens the chances that the burgeoning commonwealth will ultimately encompass most of the same territory embraced by the old Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and speeds the moment when Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is expected to resign his post.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, so he built towers of human skulls from Baghdad to New Delhi. If Soviet history portrayed Tamerlane as nothing but a bloodthirsty conqueror, so what? In this long-forgotten capital of his 14th and early 15th century empire, history can be--and is being--rewritten. Tamerlane is back--on equestrian statues proclaiming "My Strength Is in Justice." In a bizarre revival, post-Soviet Uzbekistan has repackaged the Mongol tyrant as an enlightened prince and national role model.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is launching a new initiative in Central Asia, one of the last frontiers for U.S. foreign policy and one of the most problematic. Four of the region's five republics are the last bastions of unrepentant Communist rule in the new Commonwealth of Independent States. They are also the most impoverished and in need of outside help.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | Steven Gutterman, a researcher in The Times' Moscow Bureau.
As the Commonwealth of Independent States rises on the ruins of the Soviet Union, who will be its most important figures? Here are some of the VIPs taking charge of the new, post-Soviet world: BORIS NIKOLAYEVICH YELTSIN Age: 60 Position: President of Russia Background: Graduated from Ural Polytechnic Institute in 1955 . . . spent 30 years in hometown of Sverdlovsk, western Siberia, before coming to Moscow in 1985 as chief of Communist Party Central Committee's construction department.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presidents of five Soviet Central Asian republics agreed Friday that they will join the Commonwealth of Independent States proclaimed by the leaders of the old Soviet Union's big-three Slavic republics. Their action heightens the chances that the burgeoning commonwealth will ultimately encompass most of the same territory embraced by the old Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and speeds the moment when Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is expected to resign his post.
NEWS
September 21, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this remote Asian corner of the crumbling Soviet empire, the longest line at the Alayski Market was not for bread, or meat, or even vodka. All of these were well stocked on the counters of the sprawling open-air vendor stands nearby. The line that snaked for 30 feet or more was for pigs' ears. "Hey, get out of there! I've been waiting on this line for two hours!" shouted a Russian in the line who later identified himself as Gennady.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | From Associated Press
The legislatures of Georgia and Uzbekistan took cautious steps toward sovereignty on Wednesday but followed a different path than the one blazed by the Baltic republics. These were the latest challenges to face President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who has been offering greater autonomy in an effort to persuade the Soviet Union's increasingly restive republics to remain within the fold.
NEWS
February 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
Six car bombs exploded within minutes of each other Tuesday outside Uzbekistan's government headquarters and several other buildings in an assault apparently aimed at President Islam Karimov. Karimov was not injured in the blasts, which killed at least 13 people and injured 120, the government said. No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attack in the Central Asian nation.
OPINION
September 19, 1999 | Paula R. Newberg, Paula R. Newberg, who lived and worked for several years in Central and South Asia, is the author "Politics at the Heart: The Architecture of International Assistance to Afghanistan."
One failed state is a tragedy, but a region rife with intolerance is an invitation to unending instability. In striking testament to the disorders of post-Cold War diplomacy, the states of Central Asia now confront stark choices between democratic pluralism and authoritarian centralism.
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