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Uzbekistan Ussr

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NEWS
March 17, 1988
Extremists are provoking disturbances in Uzbekistan among Crimean Tatars who want to return to their traditional homeland, the newspaper Pravda Vostoka reported. The Communist Party paper for the Central Asian republic said that "noticeable material losses" have resulted, but it did not mention any casualties. Pravda Vostoka has said that some Tatars would be allowed to return to the Crimea.
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NEWS
March 7, 1989
The president of the Soviet Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan was ousted after charges surfaced that he promoted relatives of former government and party leaders while serving on the republic's Academy of Sciences, the Tass news agency said. The Uzbek Supreme Soviet relieved Pulat K. Khabibullayev from his duties as chairman of the Presidium, the Parliament's executive body, Tass said.
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NEWS
January 13, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Communist Party chief in Uzbekistan was dismissed Tuesday and replaced by an official apparently selected by Moscow in a continuing Kremlin crackdown on corruption and inefficiency in Central Asia. Inamzhon B. Usmankhodzhayev, who had held the post in Uzbekistan for slightly more than three years, was "relieved of his duties due to retirement for health reasons," the news agency Tass said.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The late Soviet leader Leonid I. Brezhnev was directly linked for the first time Monday with widespread political corruption in the Soviet Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan. Brezhnev, the Communist Party leader from 1964 until his death in 1982, was accused in a detailed account in the government newspaper Izvestia along with the late Nikolai V. Podgorny, who was then the Soviet president, of preventing the prosecution of an Uzbek official on bribery charges.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The late Soviet leader Leonid I. Brezhnev was directly linked for the first time Monday with widespread political corruption in the Soviet Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan. Brezhnev, the Communist Party leader from 1964 until his death in 1982, was accused in a detailed account in the government newspaper Izvestia along with the late Nikolai V. Podgorny, who was then the Soviet president, of preventing the prosecution of an Uzbek official on bribery charges.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | Associated Press
A five-year investigation has uncovered bribery and corruption that cost the Uzbekistan Soviet Republic at least $6.5 billion and involved high-ranking officials including the son-in-law of the late Soviet leader Leonid I. Brezhnev, Pravda said Saturday. The official Communist Party newspaper said the corruption was institutionalized, and that involved officials and millionaire entrepreneurs in the Central Asian republic hired bodyguards and bought police protection.
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The former Communist Party leader in the Soviet Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan was reported Wednesday to have been arrested on charges of corruption, along with the republic's former president and two other top party officials, in a continuing campaign against widespread corruption there.
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The former Communist Party leader in the Soviet Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan was reported Wednesday to have been arrested on charges of corruption, along with the republic's former president and two other top party officials, in a continuing campaign against widespread corruption there.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | Associated Press
A five-year investigation has uncovered bribery and corruption that cost the Uzbekistan Soviet Republic at least $6.5 billion and involved high-ranking officials including the son-in-law of the late Soviet leader Leonid I. Brezhnev, Pravda said Saturday. The official Communist Party newspaper said the corruption was institutionalized, and that involved officials and millionaire entrepreneurs in the Central Asian republic hired bodyguards and bought police protection.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Communist Party chief in Uzbekistan was dismissed Tuesday and replaced by an official apparently selected by Moscow in a continuing Kremlin crackdown on corruption and inefficiency in Central Asia. Inamzhon B. Usmankhodzhayev, who had held the post in Uzbekistan for slightly more than three years, was "relieved of his duties due to retirement for health reasons," the news agency Tass said.
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