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BUSINESS
May 17, 1989 | From Times wire services
Despite strong congressional lobbying, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney is remaining firm in his decision to halt the Marine Corps' V-22 Osprey aircraft program, a congressional aide said today. A Pennsylvania delegation of Republican Sens. Arlen Specter and John Heinz and Republican Rep. Curt Weldon and Democratic Rep. Thomas M. Foglietta met with Cheney at the Pentagon on Tuesday to lobby for the V-22--apparently to no avail. Cheney announced in April his plans to cancel the V-22--a new tilt-rotor aircraft that takes off and lands like a helicopter but flies like a plane--as part of $10 billion in budget cuts for fiscal 1990 that begins Oct. 1.
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BUSINESS
October 1, 2005 | From Reuters
Boeing Co. apologized Friday for a mistakenly published ad for its V-22 Osprey aircraft that showed troops dropping onto the roof of a mosque in what appeared to be a simulated battle scene. The ad, coming amid concern among Muslims over U.S. military action in Iraq and Afghanistan, prompted immediate complaints from the Council on American-Islamic Relations. But Chicago-based Boeing, which created the V-22 with Bell Helicopter, a unit of Textron Inc.
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BUSINESS
May 4, 1989 | From United Press International
A top defense official said today the Pentagon is studying ways to grant at least a temporary reprieve to the V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor program, which might avert threatened layoffs. Deputy Defense Secretary Donald Atwood, making his first Capitol Hill appearance since getting the No. 2 job at the Pentagon, told the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee that two options are being examined and a decision should come "in a day or so." Atwood was peppered with questions about the program widely supported in Congress but canceled by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney as part of $10 billion in budget cuts.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Textron Inc. and Boeing Co.'s V-22 tilt-rotor aircraft won approval from the Pentagon's weapons-buying oversight board to enter full production, according to three defense officials. The decision triggers a phase in the program that the companies say may be valued at as much as $20 billion during the next 10 years to 15 years. The Pentagon plans to issue a formal statement on the decision by its Defense Acquisition Board, the officials said.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1989
Bell May Stop Work on V-22: Bell Helicopter Textron will begin layoffs next week unless the Pentagon restores funding for the Osprey V-22 tilt-rotor aircraft, a company spokesman said. In a letter to the Defense Department, Bell said it would halt work on the program Friday and begin laying off about 2,000 employees Monday. Bell has been threatening to lay off employees in Ft. Worth, since last week, when it became clear the Osprey was in trouble. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney announced $10 billion in defense cuts--among them, the V-22 program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2001
There is no doubt that the V-22 Osprey is a significant investment, but Ivan Eland's contention that the tilt-rotor aircraft ought to be scrapped in the wake of the recent accident that cost the lives of four Marines is woefully shortsighted (Commentary, Jan. 5). Eland favors limiting our acquisition of the tilt-rotor Osprey to the aircraft already purchased and using these in select operations. As for the mission requirements we aim to fulfill with the V-22, he suggests using the CH-53 or Blackhawk helicopters instead.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1989 | From Times wire services
Bell Helicopter Textron will begin layoffs next week unless the Pentagon restores funding for the Osprey V-22 tilt-rotor aircraft, a company spokesman said today. In a letter to the Defense Department, Bell said it would halt work on the program Friday and begin laying off about 2,000 employees beginning Monday. Bell has been threatening to lay off employees since last week when it became clear the Osprey was in trouble. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney on Tuesday announced $10 billion in defense cuts, and among the items eliminated was the $1.8-million V-22 program.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2005 | From Reuters
Boeing Co. apologized Friday for a mistakenly published ad for its V-22 Osprey aircraft that showed troops dropping onto the roof of a mosque in what appeared to be a simulated battle scene. The ad, coming amid concern among Muslims over U.S. military action in Iraq and Afghanistan, prompted immediate complaints from the Council on American-Islamic Relations. But Chicago-based Boeing, which created the V-22 with Bell Helicopter, a unit of Textron Inc.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
While the effects of Defense Secretary Dick Cheney's scaled-down defense budget would be felt by defense contractors nationwide, some of the hardest hits would fall on the district of embattled House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.), long the most powerful proponent of that region's defense businesses. On Tuesday, Cheney confirmed the worst fears of workers for some of the Dallas-Ft. Worth area's major defense contractors, announcing that he has proposed canceling a futuristic Marine Corps aircraft called the V-22, discontinuing an Army helicopter program named AHIP and delayed production of the Air Force's stealth bomber.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2005 | From Reuters
Problems with gearboxes aboard the V-22 tilt-rotor aircraft built by Boeing Co. and the Bell Helicopter unit of Textron Inc. could delay the start of operational tests due to begin in mid- to late-February, a program spokesman said Tuesday. Ward Carroll said the problem had set off cockpit warning lights six times since April 2004, including three in the last month. Such a warning requires the pilot to land as soon as possible.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2005 | From Reuters
Problems with gearboxes aboard the V-22 tilt-rotor aircraft built by Boeing Co. and the Bell Helicopter unit of Textron Inc. could delay the start of operational tests due to begin in mid- to late-February, a program spokesman said Tuesday. Ward Carroll said the problem had set off cockpit warning lights six times since April 2004, including three in the last month. Such a warning requires the pilot to land as soon as possible.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The Pentagon gave a boost to the U.S. Marine Corps' V-22 Osprey program, saying Boeing Co. and Textron Inc. could produce 152 aircraft through 2009, seven more than the 145 budgeted. The Osprey is a fixed-wing plane with rotors that tilt so the craft can take off and land like a helicopter. The plane was grounded and the program put on probation after two crashes in 2000 that killed 23 Marines. Reports at the time from the Pentagon's top testing office said the Osprey was unreliable.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
All technical and management problems with the V-22 Osprey aircraft project have been corrected, and the hybrid helicopter-airplane is ready to resume flight testing, Navy Secretary Gordon England said Thursday. "We've made dramatic progress in the last six or nine months," England told reporters. "All of the problems with the program are fixed."
NEWS
January 1, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the U.S. campaign in Afghanistan winding down, the inevitable "after-action" analysis is underway in military circles to determine which weapons and strategies worked and which did not. But the Marine Corps is also hoping the Afghanistan operation will help make a case for an aircraft that saw no action there: the controversial tilt-rotor V-22 Osprey, designed to land and take off like a helicopter but fly like a fixed-wing airplane.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Test flights on the V-22 Osprey will resume in April in a make-or-break effort to resolve whether the innovative but controversial aircraft is safe and reliable, the Defense Department said Friday. In announcing the renewed testing, the Pentagon's acquisition chief expressed his personal doubts about the aircraft and its design. "But the only way to prove the case one way or the other is to put the airplane back into flight test," said Edward "Pete" Aldridge, undersecretary of Defense.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The crash of a V-22 Osprey that killed four Marines in December was caused by a ruptured hydraulic line and software failure, not pilot error, the head of Marines Corps aviation said. "Whatever the problem was with the hydraulics line or with the software, we'll fix," said Lt. Gen. Fred McCorkle. The Osprey's tilt-rotors allow it to take off and land like a helicopter and fly like an airplane. The crash was one of two last year; in April, 19 Marines died in a crash blamed on pilot error.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
Key dates in development of the V-22 Osprey: June 1981: V-22 predecessor demonstrated at Paris Air Show. April 1983: Bell and Boeing awarded preliminary design contract. June 1986: Contract awarded for full-scale development, with 12-aircraft pilot production option. March 1989: First flight of V-22 prototype. April 1989: Program terminated in Pentagon budget request. December 1989: Defense Secretary Dick Cheney directs Navy to terminate all production contracts with Bell-Boeing team.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Test flights on the V-22 Osprey will resume in April in a make-or-break effort to resolve whether the innovative but controversial aircraft is safe and reliable, the Defense Department said Friday. In announcing the renewed testing, the Pentagon's acquisition chief expressed his personal doubts about the aircraft and its design. "But the only way to prove the case one way or the other is to put the airplane back into flight test," said Edward "Pete" Aldridge, undersecretary of Defense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2001
There is no doubt that the V-22 Osprey is a significant investment, but Ivan Eland's contention that the tilt-rotor aircraft ought to be scrapped in the wake of the recent accident that cost the lives of four Marines is woefully shortsighted (Commentary, Jan. 5). Eland favors limiting our acquisition of the tilt-rotor Osprey to the aircraft already purchased and using these in select operations. As for the mission requirements we aim to fulfill with the V-22, he suggests using the CH-53 or Blackhawk helicopters instead.
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