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BUSINESS
August 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
Key dates in development of the V-22 Osprey: June 1981: V-22 predecessor demonstrated at Paris Air Show. April 1983: Bell and Boeing awarded preliminary design contract. June 1986: Contract awarded for full-scale development, with 12-aircraft pilot production option. March 1989: First flight of V-22 prototype. April 1989: Program terminated in Pentagon budget request. December 1989: Defense Secretary Dick Cheney directs Navy to terminate all production contracts with Bell-Boeing team.
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NATIONAL
April 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Ten new V-22 Osprey planes will be in Iraq for combat by September, the Marine Corps said Friday. Built by Boeing Co. and Bell, a unit of Textron Inc., the planes' deployment marks a significant reversal for an aircraft program that was nearly scrapped after two deadly test crashes and a history of mechanical failures.
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NEWS
December 22, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Test flights on the V-22 Osprey will resume in April in a make-or-break effort to resolve whether the innovative but controversial aircraft is safe and reliable, the Defense Department said Friday. In announcing the renewed testing, the Pentagon's acquisition chief expressed his personal doubts about the aircraft and its design. "But the only way to prove the case one way or the other is to put the airplane back into flight test," said Edward "Pete" Aldridge, undersecretary of Defense.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The Pentagon gave a boost to the U.S. Marine Corps' V-22 Osprey program, saying Boeing Co. and Textron Inc. could produce 152 aircraft through 2009, seven more than the 145 budgeted. The Osprey is a fixed-wing plane with rotors that tilt so the craft can take off and land like a helicopter. The plane was grounded and the program put on probation after two crashes in 2000 that killed 23 Marines. Reports at the time from the Pentagon's top testing office said the Osprey was unreliable.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Navy announced in Washington it has complied with orders by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and terminated all production contracts for the controversial V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft program for the Marines. Cheney and Congress were at odds this year over Cheney's decision to kill the $27-billion program for the revolutionary aircraft, which takes off and lands like a helicopter and flies like a plane.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a clear Washington day last spring, a flashy red-white-and-blue warplane glided smoothly toward the U.S. Capitol, hovered helicopter-style over the neatly tended lawn and landed--to hearty applause--beside a throng of well-wishers assembled on the steps. It was a spectacle of the sort that only the military can produce--a heart-pounding mixture of impressive new weaponry and patriotic spirit, designed to win a place in the budget for yet another piece of military hardware.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Defense Department's inspector general has seized data from the computers of two Marine generals as an investigation into an alleged cover-up of problems with the troubled V-22 Osprey aircraft is reaching into the top ranks at the Pentagon. The investigation began in January with allegations that a lieutenant colonel who commanded the Osprey squadron in North Carolina encouraged crews to falsify maintenance records.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Ten new V-22 Osprey planes will be in Iraq for combat by September, the Marine Corps said Friday. Built by Boeing Co. and Bell, a unit of Textron Inc., the planes' deployment marks a significant reversal for an aircraft program that was nearly scrapped after two deadly test crashes and a history of mechanical failures.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Boeing Co. and Textron Inc. appear to be solving the problems that caused test versions of the V-22 Osprey aircraft to crash twice in 2000, killing 23 Marines, the Pentagon's testing chief says. The Osprey -- a fixed-wing plane with rotors that tilt so the craft can take off and land like a helicopter -- has been on probation.
NATIONAL
May 30, 2002 | From Associated Press
An overhauled V-22 Osprey took a modest first flight Wednesday, 18 months after the military grounded the Marine Corps' helicopter-plane hybrid because of two fatal crashes. Pilots hovered the tilt-rotor aircraft up to 30 feet above the runway and conducted maneuvers at the Patuxent River Naval Air Station. The action was the first in more than a year of planned testing before the V-22 is eligible for duty.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Boeing Co. and Textron Inc. appear to be solving the problems that caused test versions of the V-22 Osprey aircraft to crash twice in 2000, killing 23 Marines, the Pentagon's testing chief says. The Osprey -- a fixed-wing plane with rotors that tilt so the craft can take off and land like a helicopter -- has been on probation.
NATIONAL
August 30, 2002 | From Associated Press
A Pentagon investigation found no evidence to back up allegations that Marines altered records on the crash more than two years ago of a V-22 Osprey aircraft. The Defense Department's inspector general was looking into half a dozen specific charges that information was omitted or removed from reports concerning testing--and on the April 2000 crash in Arizona--of the aircraft that takes off like a helicopter and flies like a conventional airplane. "The ...
NATIONAL
August 9, 2002 | From Reuters
The Pentagon's chief weapon buyer said Thursday that he remained skeptical about the V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, which resumed flight testing in May after two crashes that killed 23 Marines, but he said a decision about its continuation was unlikely until next year. "I'm probably the most skeptical person in the Department of Defense right now on the V-22," built by Boeing Co. and Textron Inc., Defense Undersecretary Edward Aldridge said.
NATIONAL
May 30, 2002 | From Associated Press
An overhauled V-22 Osprey took a modest first flight Wednesday, 18 months after the military grounded the Marine Corps' helicopter-plane hybrid because of two fatal crashes. Pilots hovered the tilt-rotor aircraft up to 30 feet above the runway and conducted maneuvers at the Patuxent River Naval Air Station. The action was the first in more than a year of planned testing before the V-22 is eligible for duty.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Test flights on the V-22 Osprey will resume in April in a make-or-break effort to resolve whether the innovative but controversial aircraft is safe and reliable, the Defense Department said Friday. In announcing the renewed testing, the Pentagon's acquisition chief expressed his personal doubts about the aircraft and its design. "But the only way to prove the case one way or the other is to put the airplane back into flight test," said Edward "Pete" Aldridge, undersecretary of Defense.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-ribbon study group on Wednesday urged continuation of the Marines' troubled V-22 Osprey aircraft program, arguing that it has no "fundamental flaw" that would justify cancellation. In what may prove a pivotal expression of support, the Pentagon-commissioned panel said the Osprey remains the best choice for future amphibious assault and rescue missions, despite a record of four crashes and 30 deaths since 1992.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2002 | From Reuters
The Pentagon's chief weapon buyer said Thursday that he remained skeptical about the V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, which resumed flight testing in May after two crashes that killed 23 Marines, but he said a decision about its continuation was unlikely until next year. "I'm probably the most skeptical person in the Department of Defense right now on the V-22," built by Boeing Co. and Textron Inc., Defense Undersecretary Edward Aldridge said.
NATIONAL
August 30, 2002 | From Associated Press
A Pentagon investigation found no evidence to back up allegations that Marines altered records on the crash more than two years ago of a V-22 Osprey aircraft. The Defense Department's inspector general was looking into half a dozen specific charges that information was omitted or removed from reports concerning testing--and on the April 2000 crash in Arizona--of the aircraft that takes off like a helicopter and flies like a conventional airplane. "The ...
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Defense Department's inspector general has seized data from the computers of two Marine generals as an investigation into an alleged cover-up of problems with the troubled V-22 Osprey aircraft is reaching into the top ranks at the Pentagon. The investigation began in January with allegations that a lieutenant colonel who commanded the Osprey squadron in North Carolina encouraged crews to falsify maintenance records.
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