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NEWS
June 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Test flights of the tilt-rotor V-22 Osprey, an airplane that hovers like a helicopter, were suspended because one of five prototypes crashed on its maiden flight. At a news conference in Essington, Pa., Boeing Helicopters President Timothy Fehr said that "the aircraft haven't been grounded (permanently), but we won't resume flying until we know more" about the accident Tuesday in northern Delaware. The Osprey is a $1.8-billion program of Boeing Helicopters and Bell Helicopter Textron of Ft.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The Pentagon gave a boost to the U.S. Marine Corps' V-22 Osprey program, saying Boeing Co. and Textron Inc. could produce 152 aircraft through 2009, seven more than the 145 budgeted. The Osprey is a fixed-wing plane with rotors that tilt so the craft can take off and land like a helicopter. The plane was grounded and the program put on probation after two crashes in 2000 that killed 23 Marines. Reports at the time from the Pentagon's top testing office said the Osprey was unreliable.
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NEWS
July 21, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the second accident in little more than a year, a V-22 Osprey crashed Monday as it approached an airfield at the Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va., where it was to undergo flight tests with Marines aboard. The accident casts further doubt on the fate of the hybrid aircraft that has been the object of endless wrangling between Congress and the Defense Department. Marine Corps officials said that the aircraft carried seven people, including several Marines. All were presumed dead.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. military resumed flight testing of the V-22 Osprey aircraft after a 10-day stoppage to replace faulty hydraulic lines, a spokesman for the Osprey program office said. Ward Carroll said the Osprey, which takes off like a helicopter but flies like a plane, completed a flight to test mission software. The Pentagon grounded the Osprey in December 2000 after two crashes that killed 23 Marines.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. military resumed flight testing of the V-22 Osprey aircraft after a 10-day stoppage to replace faulty hydraulic lines, a spokesman for the Osprey program office said. Ward Carroll said the Osprey, which takes off like a helicopter but flies like a plane, completed a flight to test mission software. The Pentagon grounded the Osprey in December 2000 after two crashes that killed 23 Marines.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The crash of a V-22 Osprey that killed four Marines in December was caused by a ruptured hydraulic line and software failure, not pilot error, the head of Marines Corps aviation said. "Whatever the problem was with the hydraulics line or with the software, we'll fix," said Lt. Gen. Fred McCorkle. The Osprey's tilt-rotors allow it to take off and land like a helicopter and fly like an airplane. The crash was one of two last year; in April, 19 Marines died in a crash blamed on pilot error.
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | Times Wire Reports
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen named a three-person panel to review the troubled V-22 Osprey program. One of the tilt-rotor aircraft crashed in North Carolina earlier this week, killing four Marines and grounding the entire fleet of aircraft. The issues the panel will address include training, engineering and design, performance and safety, Cohen said. Last April an Osprey crash killed 19 Marines.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over lunch recently, members of the Pico Rivera City Council came down "hard and heavy" on their congressman, Rep. Esteban E. Torres. They pressed him to support full funding of the expensive new Air Force plane being built in their Los Angeles County community--the B-2 Stealth bomber.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1991 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, From Times Staff and Wire Reports and TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boeing Billed for Osprey Cost Overruns: The Pentagon says Boeing Co. owes more than $156 million for cost overruns on the V-22 Osprey, a claim disputed by Boeing. The attack aircraft, which can take off and land like a helicopter, is three years late, 2,900 pounds overweight and nearly $450 million over budget. Under a fixed-price pact with the government, Boeing and lead contractor Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. must pay all expenses over $1.8 billion.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Pentagon ordered 11 new V-22 Osprey aircraft for $817 million, giving a boost to a program plagued by deadly crashes and other problems. The program had been in danger of being eliminated after 23 Marines died in crashes during testing in 2000. The aircraft's maker, a joint venture between Boeing Co. and Textron Inc.'s Bell Helicopter unit, had to redesign parts of the aircraft to fix hydraulic and other problems.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Test flights on the V-22 Osprey will resume in April in a make-or-break effort to resolve whether the innovative but controversial aircraft is safe and reliable, the Defense Department said Friday. In announcing the renewed testing, the Pentagon's acquisition chief expressed his personal doubts about the aircraft and its design. "But the only way to prove the case one way or the other is to put the airplane back into flight test," said Edward "Pete" Aldridge, undersecretary of Defense.
NEWS
October 23, 2001 | From Reuters
The commander of a U.S. Marine Corps squadron testing the V-22 Osprey defended development of the revolutionary tilt-rotor aircraft Monday despite two fatal crashes and a series of setbacks that have tarnished the program. Col. Richard Dunnivan, brought in to head up the squadron and a military investigation into falsified maintenance records, remains convinced that the Osprey should replace the Marines' fleet of Vietnam War-era helicopters.
NEWS
August 11, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight Marine Corps officers have been charged with violations of the military code for their alleged roles in the falsification of maintenance records for the troubled V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, military officials said Friday. The charges are only the latest difficulty to hit the Osprey program. The innovative aircraft, which takes off like a helicopter but cruises at airplane speed, has been grounded since two crashes last year killed 23 Marines.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-ribbon study group on Wednesday urged continuation of the Marines' troubled V-22 Osprey aircraft program, arguing that it has no "fundamental flaw" that would justify cancellation. In what may prove a pivotal expression of support, the Pentagon-commissioned panel said the Osprey remains the best choice for future amphibious assault and rescue missions, despite a record of four crashes and 30 deaths since 1992.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the reset button on the computer of their beleaguered aircraft lit up, flight crew members did what almost anyone would do--they pushed it. That simple and logical act brought down their plane and raised serious questions about the future of the Marine Corps' $40-billion Osprey project. According to the Marines' official report Thursday on the fatal V-22 Osprey crash, the Dec. 11, 2000, accident began when a hydraulic line ruptured.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The crash of a V-22 Osprey that killed four Marines in December was caused by a ruptured hydraulic line and software failure, not pilot error, the head of Marines Corps aviation said. "Whatever the problem was with the hydraulics line or with the software, we'll fix," said Lt. Gen. Fred McCorkle. The Osprey's tilt-rotors allow it to take off and land like a helicopter and fly like an airplane. The crash was one of two last year; in April, 19 Marines died in a crash blamed on pilot error.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House and Senate conferees Wednesday reached accord on virtually all remaining issues involving the $305-billion 1990 defense budget, trimming the "Star Wars" anti-missile program but keeping the costly and controversial B-2 Stealth bomber alive, congressional sources said. Although a number of relatively small questions remained unresolved Wednesday night, committee leaders are likely to announce the budget agreement today, sources said.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a low-key but passionate defense of the troubled V-22 Osprey aircraft, Commandant of the Marine Corps James L. Jones on Thursday called the Osprey vital to the future of the Marine Corps and said there is no indication that a design flaw is the cause of recent crashes. "The technology is not the issue, as far as the accidents," the general said. "We will get beyond this sad period where we have had to console grieving families."
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