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V I Warshawski

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December 22, 1991 | SUSAN FERRARO, California native Susan Ferraro is a New York-based writer who is an avid mystery reader.
IT IS THE DAY AFTER THANKSGIVING, an unseasonably warm afternoon in Chicago, and Sara Paretsky is almost happy. Almost. The best-selling author of the V. I. Warshawski murder mysteries, Paretsky has recovered from the exhausting, maddening publicity that preceded the summer premiere--and box-office bomb--of "V.I. Warshawski," starring Kathleen Turner. Now it is comeback time: Paretsky's new novel, "Guardian Angel," will hit the bookstores in January.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison, Tribune Newspapers
One of the many pleasures of Sara Paretsky's V.I. Warshawski novels is that the sharp-tongued, short-tempered detective often seems to be following clues that lead not just to the heart of whatever mystery is at hand, but also into the red-hot center of the zeitgeist itself. Recent books have dealt with the trauma of the Iraq War and the dangers of the Patriot Act. In the 1980s, when V.I. burst onto the scene as one of publishing's first "hard-boiled" female detectives, the plots were spun of the concerns of those times, from corporate malfeasance to labor racketeering.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2010
Body Work A V.I. Warshawski Novel Sara Paretsky Putnam: 444 pp., $26.95
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2010
Body Work A V.I. Warshawski Novel Sara Paretsky Putnam: 444 pp., $26.95
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison, Tribune Newspapers
One of the many pleasures of Sara Paretsky's V.I. Warshawski novels is that the sharp-tongued, short-tempered detective often seems to be following clues that lead not just to the heart of whatever mystery is at hand, but also into the red-hot center of the zeitgeist itself. Recent books have dealt with the trauma of the Iraq War and the dangers of the Patriot Act. In the 1980s, when V.I. burst onto the scene as one of publishing's first "hard-boiled" female detectives, the plots were spun of the concerns of those times, from corporate malfeasance to labor racketeering.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1991 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"V.I. Warshawski" (citywide) features a killing or two, a handful of beatings, and a moderate number of kicks in the groin, but the real violence is directed not toward anyone on screen but rather against Sara Paretsky's popular detective novels which are the nominal inspiration for this tired, tepid thriller. For not the first time, the deep thinkers of Hollywood have purchased idiosyncratic material and turned it so dull and phlegmatic viewers will wonder what the original fuss was about.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991 | HILARY DE VRIES, Hilary de Vries is a frequent contributor to Sunday Calendar.
The Hamptons are just oozing into happy hour when Kathleen Turner kind of twirls into her local watering hole--"Hi! Hi, you guys. Hi, Tomas," she says pulling off her dark glasses, letting the screen door bang behind her. In Hollywood, she is still one of the most bankable actresses, a post-modern, old-fashioned sultress who first steamed up the lens 10 years ago as Matty Walker in "Body Heat" and has spent the better part of the decade as the keeper of the Bacall flame.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012
Breakdown A V.I. Warshawski Novel Sara Paretsky G.P. Putnam's Sons: 431 pp., $26.95
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Famous Voice on the Beeb: Kathleen Turner will play fictional detective V. I. Warshawski in a British Broadcasting Corp. radio serial later this year. Turner, who brought the Chicago private detective to movie screens in the United States, will take part in the dramatization of "Killing Orders" by Sarah Paretsky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991
Monterey Park police on Wednesday confiscated 58 videocassette recorders, other sophisticated electronic equipment and hundreds of videotapes from a warehouse believed to be a pirate video laboratory and distribution center. No arrests were made, but officers are continuing to investigate the man who was renting the facility at 1320 Monterey Pass Road, Police Sgt. Orlo Olsen said. He declined to name the tenant.
MAGAZINE
December 22, 1991 | SUSAN FERRARO, California native Susan Ferraro is a New York-based writer who is an avid mystery reader.
IT IS THE DAY AFTER THANKSGIVING, an unseasonably warm afternoon in Chicago, and Sara Paretsky is almost happy. Almost. The best-selling author of the V. I. Warshawski murder mysteries, Paretsky has recovered from the exhausting, maddening publicity that preceded the summer premiere--and box-office bomb--of "V.I. Warshawski," starring Kathleen Turner. Now it is comeback time: Paretsky's new novel, "Guardian Angel," will hit the bookstores in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1991 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"V.I. Warshawski" (citywide) features a killing or two, a handful of beatings, and a moderate number of kicks in the groin, but the real violence is directed not toward anyone on screen but rather against Sara Paretsky's popular detective novels which are the nominal inspiration for this tired, tepid thriller. For not the first time, the deep thinkers of Hollywood have purchased idiosyncratic material and turned it so dull and phlegmatic viewers will wonder what the original fuss was about.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991 | HILARY DE VRIES, Hilary de Vries is a frequent contributor to Sunday Calendar.
The Hamptons are just oozing into happy hour when Kathleen Turner kind of twirls into her local watering hole--"Hi! Hi, you guys. Hi, Tomas," she says pulling off her dark glasses, letting the screen door bang behind her. In Hollywood, she is still one of the most bankable actresses, a post-modern, old-fashioned sultress who first steamed up the lens 10 years ago as Matty Walker in "Body Heat" and has spent the better part of the decade as the keeper of the Bacall flame.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX
Except for "Mobsters," starring a quartet of young heartthrobs, none of the other new films opening over the weekend made a dent at the box-office. "Terminator 2: Judgment Day" kept its strong arm on first place for the fourth week--its ticket sales taking only an expected 27% drop. "Mobsters" collected a soft $6 million in its debut weekend, while "Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey" took a grim 48% drop. "Boyz N the Hood" continued strong with the highest per-screen average of the Top Five films.
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