Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsV J Day
IN THE NEWS

V J Day

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995 | H. G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Margie Leal remembers Aug. 14, 1945, as the day that Americans began smiling again. Fifty years later, Leal, a retired aircraft worker and Garden Grove resident, remembers the unconstrained joy of her family and neighbors when word flashed across the Pacific that the Japanese government had surrendered to the United States, bringing an end to World War II. "It was so unexpected. It happened so fast.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
She's biiiiiig -- and a big tourist magnet -- but the "Forever Marilyn" sculpture in Chicago's Pioneer Court isn't forever. The Seward Johnson sculpture that drew scathing media reviews when it was unveiled in July will remain only until spring 2012.  "I love, love, love it!" gushes an Orlando woman riding a bus as she takes in the gargantuan statue. And there are the tourists posing for their own photos, looking up her skirt or grabbing a leg at the junction of Upper Michigan Avenue and the Chicago River.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1985
Two letter writers (Aug. 24) took you to task for not recognizing in print V-J Day, which they claim was Aug. 14. I'm surprised you didn't defend yourselves. You obviously know, as I do, that V-J Day is Sept. 2. On Aug. 14, Japan accepted the Allied surrender terms, but President Truman proclaimed Sept. 2 as V-J Day, the day Japan signed the surrender agreement aboard the battleship Missouri in Tokyo Bay. LAURIE GOFFMAN Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
It's one of the most iconic images to emerge from World War II. Life magazine photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt's photograph of an anonymous young sailor in a dark-blue uniform dipping a white-uniformed nurse backward while giving her a long kiss in the middle of Times Square on Aug. 14, 1945, symbolized the euphoria surrounding the news that the Japanese had surrendered and the war was finally over. Edith Shain, a retired Los Angeles elementary school teacher who claimed to be the mystery nurse in the photo seen by millions around the world, died of cancer Sunday at her home in Los Angeles, said her son, Michael.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1995
Re "A Kiss May Not Still Be a Kiss," by Donna Britt, Commentary, Aug. 31: Alfred Eisenstaedt's famous unposed picture of a sailor grabbing a female and planting a big smooch on her lips was a mere release of pent-up emotion--the sailor had probably been a witness to the horrors of the war, he was probably so elated at being alive and on American shores; and, yes, he was probably ready for some female action--but not at that time. V-J Day was not only celebrated where this picture was taken, but in my own back yard, so to speak--at CBS Radio, outside the building located on Sunset Boulevard and Gower Street.
TRAVEL
March 15, 2009
murals in what used to be the Rincon Annex Post Office, now a redeveloped complex. The building is open to the public. There is a nice set of pictures at www.flickr.com/photos/sftrajan/2054921895/. Technically, they're not from the Depression, as Refregier began them in 1940, but they're a great set of California history panels -- inspiring, but warts and all, including the not-so-pretty labor troubles. I haven't seen them since the building was renovated, but the pictures show that they're well-preserved.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
She's biiiiiig -- and a big tourist magnet -- but the "Forever Marilyn" sculpture in Chicago's Pioneer Court isn't forever. The Seward Johnson sculpture that drew scathing media reviews when it was unveiled in July will remain only until spring 2012.  "I love, love, love it!" gushes an Orlando woman riding a bus as she takes in the gargantuan statue. And there are the tourists posing for their own photos, looking up her skirt or grabbing a leg at the junction of Upper Michigan Avenue and the Chicago River.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1999
I was 6 years old and on crutches with a broken leg. We then lived in Burlington, Iowa, and it was a hot, muggy August day. I wondered: Why are all of these people acting so crazy? Screaming, horns blowing, people shouting and strangers hugging and kissing each other. It just did not make sense until someone explained to me: The war was over. It was V-J Day. CHARLES JONES Calabasas In 1932 I was 11 years old. I sold Liberty magazines after school. My great "business" opportunity came with the 1932 Olympics being held in the Coliseum, which was about one mile from my home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Art Beale was released from a Japanese prisoner of war camp in August, 1945, he weighed less than 80 pounds and had a soul filled with wrenching memories. * Nearly 100 of the 119 Navy officers he served with in the Philippines were dead. Some had starved, some were decapitated by the enemy, and others were doused with gasoline and set on fire when Allied troops advanced on the camps where they were held.
NEWS
August 15, 1985 | SAUL RUBIN and MICHAEL SEILER, Times Staff Writers
Vice President George Bush, a decorated veteran of the war in the Pacific with Japan, led the nation Wednesday in commemorating the end of World War II with a pledge that America will "never fall prey to complacency and unpreparedness again."
TRAVEL
March 15, 2009
murals in what used to be the Rincon Annex Post Office, now a redeveloped complex. The building is open to the public. There is a nice set of pictures at www.flickr.com/photos/sftrajan/2054921895/. Technically, they're not from the Depression, as Refregier began them in 1940, but they're a great set of California history panels -- inspiring, but warts and all, including the not-so-pretty labor troubles. I haven't seen them since the building was renovated, but the pictures show that they're well-preserved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1999
When I was in junior high school, I wanted to play in the orchestra. I went to Mr. Shonick, who conducted the orchestra and the band, and asked if I could join those groups. He said they needed an oboe player. Thanks to his help, I was able to rent an oboe, find a teacher and join the band and orchestra. He was a really great teacher. One day he disappeared from the school. Everyone wanted to know what happened to him. We heard that he had failed the security check, that he had been a member of the Communist Party at some time in his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1995
Re "A Kiss May Not Still Be a Kiss," by Donna Britt, Commentary, Aug. 31: Alfred Eisenstaedt's famous unposed picture of a sailor grabbing a female and planting a big smooch on her lips was a mere release of pent-up emotion--the sailor had probably been a witness to the horrors of the war, he was probably so elated at being alive and on American shores; and, yes, he was probably ready for some female action--but not at that time. V-J Day was not only celebrated where this picture was taken, but in my own back yard, so to speak--at CBS Radio, outside the building located on Sunset Boulevard and Gower Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By his account, 85-year-old Ward Munson has led a fairly ordinary life. But for one extraordinary moment almost 50 years ago, Munson--then a U.S. Navy lieutenant--stood on the deck of the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay and watched as Gen. Douglas MacArthur and Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz met Japanese dignitaries for the official surrender ceremonies ending World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Art Beale was released from a Japanese prisoner of war camp in August, 1945, he weighed less than 80 pounds and had a soul filled with wrenching memories. * Nearly 100 of the 119 Navy officers he served with in the Philippines were dead. Some had starved, some were decapitated by the enemy, and others were doused with gasoline and set on fire when Allied troops advanced on the camps where they were held.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995 | H. G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Margie Leal remembers Aug. 14, 1945, as the day that Americans began smiling again. Fifty years later, Leal, a retired aircraft worker and Garden Grove resident, remembers the unconstrained joy of her family and neighbors when word flashed across the Pacific that the Japanese government had surrendered to the United States, bringing an end to World War II. "It was so unexpected. It happened so fast.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|