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March 3, 2008 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
The voice comes out of the dark to find you. "Doomed. Doomed. Doooomed." Dr. Rev. Cotton Slocum has seen The End, and you shall burn in everlasting fire unless you heed his word. Lights up, and he's here among us: frozen wave of a pompadour, powder blue suit, vowels thick as Texas ribs, offering toll-free salvation and an unforgettable act of theater, courtesy of V.J. Foster, now starring in "Carnage, A Comedy," at the Actors’ Gang. "You look out at the audience," he says. "What's the feeling in the house?
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2008 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
The voice comes out of the dark to find you. "Doomed. Doomed. Doooomed." Dr. Rev. Cotton Slocum has seen The End, and you shall burn in everlasting fire unless you heed his word. Lights up, and he's here among us: frozen wave of a pompadour, powder blue suit, vowels thick as Texas ribs, offering toll-free salvation and an unforgettable act of theater, courtesy of V.J. Foster, now starring in "Carnage, A Comedy," at the Actors’ Gang. "You look out at the audience," he says. "What's the feeling in the house?
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2002 | Don Shirley
The Actors' Gang is going on tour. The Gang will tour "The Guys," Anne Nelson's staged reading about the aftermath of Sept. 11, to universities in Mississippi and Georgia and to the Annenberg Center in Philadelphia next spring and to several Midwestern venues next fall. Part of the motivation is to pay actors a decent wage. Participating Gang actors -- V.J. Foster, Cynthia Ettinger, Brent Hinkley and Kate Mulligan -- will get $500 a week plus expenses, paid for by the presenters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008
Fictional televangelist Cotton Slocum gets skewered again as the Actors' Gang revives "Carnage, a Comedy," Tim Robbins' (yes, that one) and Adam Simon's 1987 satire about profit-mongering religious zealotry, which the authors have updated.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2007
IN an otherwise insightful and intriguing article about the genesis of the play "Flags," and its mysterious author Jane Martin ["A Dramatic Battle to Bring War Onto Stage," Aug. 26], Sean Mitchell laments the fact that the American stage has yet to produce a signature piece of the ongoing Iraqi conflict.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Considering that some New York theater critics felt that the satire in Tim Robbins' "Embedded" had already exceeded its shelf life when the play opened at the Public Theater early last year, it's surprising how much some of the recorded version, "Embedded/Live," feels chillingly relevant.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Director-adapter Michael Schlitt's version of "The Inspector General," Nikolai Gogol's tale of mistaken identity in 19th century czarist Russia, inhabits the realm of the absurd, peopled with grotesque human monsters. As presented at the Actors' Gang, its results are mixed: a well-considered, elegantly hilarious first act followed by an unrestrained, excessively indulgent second act. A tighter second half would really lift this well-acted interpretation into absurdist heaven.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2002 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
Unbridled flimflam energizes "Alagazam," freaking out in the late-night slot at the Actors' Gang. Director Brent Hinkley and a demented cast devour Adam Simon and Tim Robbins' tent-show vaudeville with fearless perversity. Reworking the authors' 1985 "Slick Slack Griff Graff," "Alagazam" wraps carnival circuitry around a symbolist post-World War II America.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2000 | JANA J. MONJI
Golf originated in the foggy damp of Scotland, and at the turn of the last century a Scotsman named Tom Morris was one of the game's pioneers. Christopher Metas and Lee Arenberg's "Foursome," at the Actors' Gang Theatre, pits Morris against an evil entity to save the world. But this brief play's sophomoric humor only occasionally rises above the level of a high school skit. A fellow in a black suit and tie, Staan P. Green (V.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2000 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
In Matthew Wilder's far-reaching but uneven staging, "Uncle Vanya: Scenes From Country Life" at Playwrights' Arena alternates between the galvanic and the soporific. Paul Schmidt's updated translation, supposedly set in a small Wisconsin town, keeps the essence of the play intact. A bold innovator, Wilder obviously has fun playing with Schmidt's contemporary references.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2008 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
In the Actor's Gang's "Carnage, A Comedy," the marriage of right-wing religion and the military-industrial-entertainment complex has produced a brood of apocalyptic children: hate-mongering radio hosts, bomb-throwing fanatics, private militias and sub-prime lenders. So far, so familiar.
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