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Vaccine Safety

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NEWS
August 25, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Vaccines rarely cause serious side effects, health officials say. When problems do arise, they most often occur in people with preexisting immune system disorders.   The report , issued Thursday by an independent panel of medical experts convened by the Institute of Medicine -- which provides independent, science-based analyses -- should be used to help administer claims through the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. That program was established in 1986 to provide financial compensation to people who were harmed by eight recommended vaccines.
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NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
Are doctors inadvertently fueling the anti-vaccine movement? A study published Monday in the Journal of Pediatrics analyzed more than 100 vaccine discussions involving 16 healthcare providers and found that how the doctor phrased the vaccine question had an impact on swaying parents who were hesitant about whether to vaccinate their children. The study found that when doctors told parents it was time to vaccinate (“It's time for Bobby to have his shots”) rather than presenting it as a question (“What do you want to do about Bobby's shots?
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BUSINESS
March 20, 2005
"Merck Misled on Vaccines, Some Say" (March 7) leads the reader to believe that Merck & Co. misled the Food and Drug Administration and doctors and patients from 1999 to 2001, at which time it was distributing both thimerosal-free and thimerosal-containing hepatitis B vaccine. As a pediatrician who used these vaccines during that period, I can report that there was no misleading of doctors. This is another in a series of articles that seem to be biased toward the idea that vaccines are the cause of autism and that vaccine companies like Merck have deceived the public about their safety.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Despite Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann's recent charge that the HPV vaccine can cause "mental retardation," ongoing safety studies on the vaccine reveal no surprises, health officials said Tuesday. "We have no evidence" that HPV vaccination causes mental retardation, said Dr. Eileen Dunne, an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at a hearing of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, a panel that advises the CDC. The committee voted 13-0 to recommend routine human papillomavirus vaccination for boys ages 11 and 12. The vote included a review of the safety of the vaccine, which has been in use among girls in the United States since 2006.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2002 | VICKI KEMPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An aggressive effort by Rep. Dan Burton (R-Ind.) to investigate whether childhood vaccines can cause autism has set up a political showdown over the medical privacy of 8 million HMO patients, more than 6 million of them Californians. Scientists said Thursday that the public-private research partnership set up to protect all Americans from deadly diseases and bioterrorist attack could be undermined if Burton subpoenaed the project's huge database. Rep. Henry A.
HEALTH
August 5, 2011 | By Amanda Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As students return to middle schools and high schools in California this fall, they will need more than fresh notebooks and apples for their teachers. Thanks to a state law that took effect last month, students entering grades 7 through 12 will need proof that they received a vaccine for whooping cough. The law was prompted by last year's outbreak of the highly contagious respiratory infection, which is also known as pertussis. Nearly 9,500 cases were reported in California, the most in 65 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000 | BERNARD RIMLAND, Bernard Rimland is director of the Autism Research Institute, based in San Diego; editor of the Autism Research Review International; founder of the Autism Society of America, and father of a 44-year-old autistic son
First, do no harm. If the multibillion-dollar vaccine industry had heeded Hippocrates' ancient dictum and concentrated on making vaccines safe, the 300% to 500% nationwide increase in autism probably would not have occurred. Concern for vaccine safety might have prevented the simultaneous sharp rise in other chronic and debilitating diseases such as asthma, allergies, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, arthritis and Crohn's disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001 | ERIC L. HURWITZ, Eric L. Hurwitz is an assistant professor at UCLA's School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
According to recent medical findings, many parents believe that childhood vaccines are unsafe and seek exemptions from school mandates. Because unvaccinated children put themselves and others at greater risk of highly contagious diseases that can be prevented by vaccines, it is worth exploring the possible origins of these beliefs and whether they are scientifically justified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2004 | Myron Levin, Times Staff Writer
Pharmaceutical giant Aventis-Pasteur is trying to rally opposition to state legislation that would bar use of a mercury-based preservative in vaccines administered to infants and pregnant women in California. In a late charge against the bill, Aventis has recruited an important ally -- the California Conference of Local Health Officers, which represents chief medical officers of all 58 California counties. The group's president, Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2009 | Rong-Gong Lin II and Sandra Poindexter
A rising number of California parents are choosing to send their children to kindergarten without routine vaccinations, putting hundreds of elementary schools in the state at risk for outbreaks of childhood diseases eradicated in the U.S. years ago. Exemptions from vaccines -- which allow children to enroll in public and private schools without state-mandated shots -- have more than doubled since 1997, according to a Times analysis of state data obtained last week.
NEWS
August 25, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Vaccines rarely cause serious side effects, health officials say. When problems do arise, they most often occur in people with preexisting immune system disorders.   The report , issued Thursday by an independent panel of medical experts convened by the Institute of Medicine -- which provides independent, science-based analyses -- should be used to help administer claims through the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. That program was established in 1986 to provide financial compensation to people who were harmed by eight recommended vaccines.
HEALTH
August 5, 2011 | By Amanda Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As students return to middle schools and high schools in California this fall, they will need more than fresh notebooks and apples for their teachers. Thanks to a state law that took effect last month, students entering grades 7 through 12 will need proof that they received a vaccine for whooping cough. The law was prompted by last year's outbreak of the highly contagious respiratory infection, which is also known as pertussis. Nearly 9,500 cases were reported in California, the most in 65 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2009 | Rong-Gong Lin II and Sandra Poindexter
A rising number of California parents are choosing to send their children to kindergarten without routine vaccinations, putting hundreds of elementary schools in the state at risk for outbreaks of childhood diseases eradicated in the U.S. years ago. Exemptions from vaccines -- which allow children to enroll in public and private schools without state-mandated shots -- have more than doubled since 1997, according to a Times analysis of state data obtained last week.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2005
"Merck Misled on Vaccines, Some Say" (March 7) leads the reader to believe that Merck & Co. misled the Food and Drug Administration and doctors and patients from 1999 to 2001, at which time it was distributing both thimerosal-free and thimerosal-containing hepatitis B vaccine. As a pediatrician who used these vaccines during that period, I can report that there was no misleading of doctors. This is another in a series of articles that seem to be biased toward the idea that vaccines are the cause of autism and that vaccine companies like Merck have deceived the public about their safety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2004 | Myron Levin, Times Staff Writer
Pharmaceutical giant Aventis-Pasteur is trying to rally opposition to state legislation that would bar use of a mercury-based preservative in vaccines administered to infants and pregnant women in California. In a late charge against the bill, Aventis has recruited an important ally -- the California Conference of Local Health Officers, which represents chief medical officers of all 58 California counties. The group's president, Dr.
WORLD
June 23, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Fear and rumors in northern Nigeria about vaccinations have undermined an ambitious campaign to eradicate polio by the end of the year, international health officials said Tuesday. The disease has swept from Nigeria into 10 other African countries that had been declared polio-free, threatening the largest outbreak seen in years, they said.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
Are doctors inadvertently fueling the anti-vaccine movement? A study published Monday in the Journal of Pediatrics analyzed more than 100 vaccine discussions involving 16 healthcare providers and found that how the doctor phrased the vaccine question had an impact on swaying parents who were hesitant about whether to vaccinate their children. The study found that when doctors told parents it was time to vaccinate (“It's time for Bobby to have his shots”) rather than presenting it as a question (“What do you want to do about Bobby's shots?
HEALTH
September 4, 2000 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Parents of infants and toddlers should start making room for yet another vaccination in their children's already packed immunization schedule. The new vaccine, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in February, protects against the serious, sometimes deadly bacteria responsible for many cases of childhood meningitis, pneumonia and bacteremia.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2002 | VICKI KEMPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An aggressive effort by Rep. Dan Burton (R-Ind.) to investigate whether childhood vaccines can cause autism has set up a political showdown over the medical privacy of 8 million HMO patients, more than 6 million of them Californians. Scientists said Thursday that the public-private research partnership set up to protect all Americans from deadly diseases and bioterrorist attack could be undermined if Burton subpoenaed the project's huge database. Rep. Henry A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001 | ERIC L. HURWITZ, Eric L. Hurwitz is an assistant professor at UCLA's School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
According to recent medical findings, many parents believe that childhood vaccines are unsafe and seek exemptions from school mandates. Because unvaccinated children put themselves and others at greater risk of highly contagious diseases that can be prevented by vaccines, it is worth exploring the possible origins of these beliefs and whether they are scientifically justified.
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