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Vaccine

OPINION
August 10, 2013 | By Nina Shapiro
Across the country, preschools and elementary schools are declaring themselves nut free or peanut free, asking families not to pack lunch foods that could pose life-threatening dangers to highly allergic children. And the prohibitions are expanding beyond nuts. Some schools, for example, have prohibited powdered cheese products to protect children who are especially dairy sensitive. These measures may be excessive, but as a physician, I understand the desire to protect students. Children with serious allergies really can have severe reactions to trigger foods, so it's not that surprising that some schools have reacted aggressively.
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SCIENCE
August 8, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
An experimental malaria vaccine is safe and effective, researchers said, performing better in early trials than any vaccine tested so far in the fight against the disease. In a small clinical trial involving 40 U.S. adults, 12 of the 15 people who received doses of the PfSPZ vaccine were protected from malaria, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science. Though preliminary, the results represent hope in the battle against an illness contracted by hundreds of millions of people every year.
SCIENCE
July 25, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Although HPV vaccinations can reduce the risk of cancer-causing infections in adolescent girls by half, immunization rates across the United States have stalled over the last year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At a Thursday press briefing, health officials said they were alarmed to find that despite the vaccine's proven effectiveness and safety, both parents and doctors were failing to ensure that teens received the three-dose human papillomavirus vaccine along with other recommended shots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
Two visitors from Europe are suspected of falling ill with measles in Ventura County, prompting public health officials to remind the public to get vaccinated. Health authorities said one of the visitors was confirmed to have measles, and the other is suspected of contracting the highly contagious disease. The cases were in eastern Ventura County, which borders Los Angeles County. The confirmation of measles comes as cases of the disease have been on the rise in the United States, despite it being virtually eradicated in this country in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - Less than a week after Elisabeth Hasselbeck said her goodbyes after 10 years on "The View," another divisive blond has joined the daytime talk show. On Monday, Barbara Walters confirmed the rumors that Playboy model-turned-anti-vaccine-crusader Jenny McCarthy would officially become a co-host on "The View" when it launches its 17th season on Sept. 9. "We love her because she's fun and uninhibited and opinionated enough to help us begin the latest chapter in 'The View' history," Walters said on the air of McCarthy, who has made 17 appearances on the show, including eight as a guest co-host.
SCIENCE
June 28, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
A "reverse vaccine" that allows people with Type 1 diabetes to produce their own insulin has passed its first test with human subjects, according to a new study. The success points to a potential new strategy for treating those in the early stages of the disease, experts said. The therapy is designed to protect cells in the pancreas that make insulin, a hormone the body needs to convert sugars and starches into energy. In people with Type 1 diabetes, the immune system goes haywire and attacks those crucial insulin-producing cells for reasons that medical researchers don't understand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2013 | By Titania Kumeh, Los Angeles Times
Wade Gong's sister was 28 when she first felt a deep pain near the side of her stomach. Then she noticed the lump. The Chinese immigrant was uninsured, so she didn't go to the hospital right away. When she finally did, it was too late. She was in the late stages of liver cancer caused by hepatitis B, a silent virus that had been assaulting her liver since she was born. An Amherst graduate and math whiz who lived with her brother and parents in Rosemead, she died six months after being diagnosed.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
The HPV vaccine may be controversial, but it works, new research shows. The rate of HPV infection among teenage girls dropped from 11.5% in the “pre-vaccine era” to 5.1% in the “vaccine era,” researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. That's a drop of 56%, the study notes. The infection rates cover the four types of HPV that are targeted by the vaccines Gardasil and Cervarix. Human papillomaviruses are the most common cause of sexually transmitted infections, and more than half of people who are sexually active become infected with one of the more than 40 types of HPV that are known to spread during vaginal, oral or anal sex, according to the National Cancer Institute . HPVs are responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer, along with most cases of anal cancer, the NCI says.
SCIENCE
April 26, 2013 | Melissa Healy
In another major setback for efforts to develop an HIV vaccine, federal researchers have shut down a key clinical trial after an independent panel of safety experts determined that volunteers who got an experimental vaccine appeared to be slightly more likely to contract the human immunodeficiency virus than those who got a placebo. Investigators involved in recruiting volunteers and running the trial at 21 sites across the country were ordered Tuesday morning to stop immunizing volunteers with the genetically engineered HVTN 505 vaccine and to inform the nearly 2,500 people who participated in the study whether they got the vaccine or the placebo.
SCIENCE
April 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
In another major setback for efforts to develop a vaccine to boost immunity to the human immunodeficiency virus, known as HIV, a key clinical trial was ordered shut down this week after an independent panel of safety experts found that participants getting the vaccine appeared to be slightly more likely to contract the virus and no better at suppressing its replication than those who got a placebo. Investigators involved in recruiting volunteers and running the trial at 21 sites across the country, including the AIDS Research Alliance of America in Los Angeles, were ordered to stop immunizing volunteers with the genetically engineered HVTN 505 vaccine and to inform the subjects enrolled in the study whether they got the experimental vaccine or the placebo.
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