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Vaclav Klaus

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NEWS
June 7, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five days of uncharacteristic squirming in the political spotlight, Czech Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus got the go-ahead Thursday to form a new government, even though his right-wing coalition narrowly lost its parliamentary majority in weekend elections. Czech President Vaclav Havel made the announcement after meeting with Klaus and leaders from the country's other major political parties.
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WORLD
October 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Poland's president approved the European Union reform treaty Saturday, ratcheting up the pressure on the Czech Republic as the only nation yet to sign off on the agreement designed to sharpen EU decision-making and increase the bloc's influence. President Lech Kaczynski signed Poland's ratification of the so-called Lisbon Treaty at a ceremony attended by European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso and other EU leaders. The deal seeks to strengthen the bloc's institutions after its rapid expansion eastward, and must be ratified by all 27 EU nations.
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NEWS
June 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Vaclav Havel insisted that Czechoslovakia's future should be decided by a referendum--not by an agreement between Czech and Slovak leaders that could split the country without a popular vote. A referendum "is so far the only constitutional way of making such a change," he said. Czech leader Vaclav Klaus said a referendum has not been ruled out.
WORLD
March 1, 2003 | David Holley and Iva Drapalova, Special to The Times
Lawmakers elected former Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus on Friday to succeed his longtime rival, Vaclav Havel, as Czech president. Klaus won a drawn-out struggle for the presidency in part through an effort to change his image from an abrasive and arrogant right-winger to a statesman determined to listen to all views and represent all citizens.
WORLD
March 1, 2003 | David Holley and Iva Drapalova, Special to The Times
Lawmakers elected former Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus on Friday to succeed his longtime rival, Vaclav Havel, as Czech president. Klaus won a drawn-out struggle for the presidency in part through an effort to change his image from an abrasive and arrogant right-winger to a statesman determined to listen to all views and represent all citizens.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vaclav Klaus, the likely prime minister after weekend elections in Czechoslovakia, said Sunday that he will begin negotiations today with his Slovak counterpart, Vladimir Meciar, on the formation of a new government. Klaus spoke with reporters after a two-hour meeting with President Vaclav Havel. Presidential aides said Havel instructed Klaus to begin the process of putting together a government.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"They started it," Stefan Klemens said, "now let us finish it." Klemens, a 50-year-old delivery truck driver, had just stood in line for 20 minutes Friday in Prague's fabled Wenceslas Square to sign a petition. In effect, the petition says to the Slovak republic, lately flirting with the idea of putting an end to the 74-year-old Czechoslovak state: "Go ahead. Get lost!"
WORLD
October 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Poland's president approved the European Union reform treaty Saturday, ratcheting up the pressure on the Czech Republic as the only nation yet to sign off on the agreement designed to sharpen EU decision-making and increase the bloc's influence. President Lech Kaczynski signed Poland's ratification of the so-called Lisbon Treaty at a ceremony attended by European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso and other EU leaders. The deal seeks to strengthen the bloc's institutions after its rapid expansion eastward, and must be ratified by all 27 EU nations.
WORLD
February 10, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Czech President Vaclav Klaus again narrowly failed to win reelection in a parliamentary vote that has deeply split the ruling coalition. The right-winger Klaus, 66, fell one vote short of the necessary majority in the two houses of Parliament to earn another five-year term. He remains the favorite over challenger Jan Svejnar, an independent economist, for a new vote expected next week. Presidents help steer the EU member country by appointing prime ministers, central bank chiefs and top judges.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five days of uncharacteristic squirming in the political spotlight, Czech Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus got the go-ahead Thursday to form a new government, even though his right-wing coalition narrowly lost its parliamentary majority in weekend elections. Czech President Vaclav Havel made the announcement after meeting with Klaus and leaders from the country's other major political parties.
NEWS
June 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Vaclav Havel insisted that Czechoslovakia's future should be decided by a referendum--not by an agreement between Czech and Slovak leaders that could split the country without a popular vote. A referendum "is so far the only constitutional way of making such a change," he said. Czech leader Vaclav Klaus said a referendum has not been ruled out.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"They started it," Stefan Klemens said, "now let us finish it." Klemens, a 50-year-old delivery truck driver, had just stood in line for 20 minutes Friday in Prague's fabled Wenceslas Square to sign a petition. In effect, the petition says to the Slovak republic, lately flirting with the idea of putting an end to the 74-year-old Czechoslovak state: "Go ahead. Get lost!"
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vaclav Klaus, the likely prime minister after weekend elections in Czechoslovakia, said Sunday that he will begin negotiations today with his Slovak counterpart, Vladimir Meciar, on the formation of a new government. Klaus spoke with reporters after a two-hour meeting with President Vaclav Havel. Presidential aides said Havel instructed Klaus to begin the process of putting together a government.
NEWS
January 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
President Vaclav Havel has appointed a new Cabinet, signaling the end of an era dominated by a premier who oversaw the country's split from Czechoslovakia. Havel, hoping to end the government crisis, flew in from his vacation in Lanzarote, Spain, to officially appoint the new Cabinet of Premier Josef Tosovsky. Premier Vaclav Klaus, who led the country from 1992 until late last year, designed its economic reforms and oversaw the peaceful split of the former Czechoslovak federation on Jan.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The country's prime minister and Parliament speaker shrugged off one of the largest street protests since the fall of communism 10 years ago, saying they would not resign despite demonstrators' demands to do so. Czech Premier Milos Zeman told the Mlada Fronta Dnes daily that "no demonstration, however large," can change the fact that the country's government was freely elected. Parliament Speaker Vaclav Klaus said Friday's protests were an attempt to destabilize the political situation.
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