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Vaclav Maly

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1997 | From Associated Press
The boyish-looking dissident who was a leading voice of the 1989 Velvet Revolution is now the newest bishop of the Czech Roman Catholic church. But that doesn't mean Vaclav Maly has become any more conventional. As a bishop, he keeps in touch with ordinary folk. Maly, 46, wears street clothes instead of clerical garb, prefers public transportation to his church-provided car and occasionally visits pubs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1997 | From Associated Press
The boyish-looking dissident who was a leading voice of the 1989 Velvet Revolution is now the newest bishop of the Czech Roman Catholic church. But that doesn't mean Vaclav Maly has become any more conventional. As a bishop, he keeps in touch with ordinary folk. Maly, 46, wears street clothes instead of clerical garb, prefers public transportation to his church-provided car and occasionally visits pubs.
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NEWS
December 8, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there was a moment when Czechoslvakia's opposition seemed suddenly vulnerable and hesitant, it came last Sunday with the shock that days of mass protests had produced a new government still dominated by Communists. Spirits tumbled as doubts surfaced that Civic Forum for the first time had seriously erred by halting its mass demonstrations too early and refusing to offer names for the new government.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there was a moment when Czechoslvakia's opposition seemed suddenly vulnerable and hesitant, it came last Sunday with the shock that days of mass protests had produced a new government still dominated by Communists. Spirits tumbled as doubts surfaced that Civic Forum for the first time had seriously erred by halting its mass demonstrations too early and refusing to offer names for the new government.
NEWS
March 21, 1989 | From Times wire services
A court today rejected an appeal to free dissident playwright Vaclav Havel, but the judge reduced one charge and trimmed his nine-month jail term by a month. The decision concerning Havel, convicted and jailed in connection with a protest in January, was greeted with cries of "Shame!" and "Release him!" from a crowd of about 150 supporters who jammed a corridor outside the courtroom.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Cardinal Frantisek Tomasek, a symbol of the struggle for religious freedom under communism, died Tuesday at 93 of heart failure, the state news agency CSTK reported. Tomasek's quiet defiance of the government and his dedication to Czechoslovakia's oppressed faithful won him the devotion of millions of the country's Roman Catholics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The whiff of sanctimonious religion that first comes off of filmmaker DeWitt Sage's "Faith Under Fire" (at 6 p.m. Sunday on KCET Channel 28) eventually gets blown away by a realistic portrait of the courage and strains that have run through the triumphant anti-communist resistance in Poland and Czechoslovakia. What begins as a report on the church vs. the communist state becomes a broader look at secular and religious forces.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The people got their first glimpse of the country's new Communist Party leader, Karel Urbanek, on Saturday, and their initial reaction was mixed. "We don't believe him," commented one worker after watching Urbanek's first television speech Saturday night. An office worker who also saw the speech said the 48-year-old party boss appeared honest, but she remained skeptical about his intentions.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Those who write the history of the second "Prague Spring" will find its beginnings on a crisp autumn night one week ago in this city's Narodni Street. It was here that yet another hard-line Communist regime lost its ultimate weapon of power: fear. Riot police systematically beat many of the 20,000 young people who had come into the street that night to demand an end to the regime and immediate free elections.
NEWS
July 10, 1988 | WILLIAM ECHIKSON, Christian Science Monitor
Kati Fabian wouldn't listen. When the 22-year-old Budapest University student decided in May to join a new independent Hungarian students union, her parents warned her that it might jeopardize her career. Dinner time turned into shouting matches. "My parents plead with me, 'Don't go, don't go, it's dangerous,' " Fabian said. "I answer, 'Why? What do I have to lose?' " An explosive generation gap is destabilizing Eastern Europe.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the huge vaulted ceiling of St. Margaret's Basilica, Baroque angels stared down Sunday at thousands of Czechoslovaks celebrating freedom. The normally solemn mood of the day--the third Sunday of Advent in the church calendar--gave way to an almost giddy cheer as church leaders dedicated the Mass to commemorate Czechoslovaks who died for liberty in the past and praise those who have won liberty in the present.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | CHARLES POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hard-line Communist government of Czechoslovakia awoke today like the next-to-last patient in the rehabilitation ward of East Bloc socialism, with only the strait-jacket case of Nicolae Ceausescu's Romania for company.
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