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Vada Hill

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BUSINESS
June 2, 1999 | GREG HERNANDEZ and GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Vada Hill, the Taco Bell Corp. executive largely responsible for making the chain's talking Chihuahua a fast-food icon, is leaving the Irvine-based company for the Federal National Mortgage Assn. Hill, 39, will become chief marketing officer of the quasi-public outfit better known as Fannie Mae, a government-chartered company that buys home loans in the secondary market.
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BUSINESS
June 2, 1999 | GREG HERNANDEZ and GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Vada Hill, the Taco Bell Corp. executive largely responsible for making the chain's talking Chihuahua a fast-food icon, is leaving the Irvine-based company for the Federal National Mortgage Assn. Hill, 39, will become chief marketing officer of the quasi-public outfit better known as Fannie Mae, a government-chartered company that buys home loans in the secondary market.
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BUSINESS
November 8, 1997 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new management of Taco Bell Corp. on Friday awarded the regional advertising portion of its $200-million account to Foote, Cone & Belding of Chicago. Foote Cone beat out sister agency Bozell Worldwide, which has handled the business since 1994. The agencies are units of Chicago-based True North Communications Inc. Foote Cone "has committed to making a significant investment in quickly building an experienced field team," Taco Bell Marketing Director Vada Hill said in a statement.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1999 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taco Bell Corp. has named KFC veteran Kip Knight as its new chief marketing manager, succeeding Vada Hill, who was responsible for making the Irvine chain's talking Chihuahua a fast-food icon. Knight will assume his new duties July 6, the company said Tuesday. Knight, 43, is currently a vice president of marketing for Tricon Restaurants International, parent company for Taco Bell, KFC and Pizza Hut.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1998 | From Associated Press
Taco Bell is putting a line of heftier, spicier tacos on its menu and is backing the introduction with a $60-million-plus promotional campaign featuring its talking Chihuahua. The chain of Mexican fast-food restaurants introduced three types of gorditas--Spanish for "little fat ones" and a term of endearment in Mexico--at area restaurants on Wednesday.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1997 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can a big-eyed Chihuahua with an appetite for Mexican-style fare help to beef up fast-food sales? Taco Bell Corp. is betting that a new string of television ads featuring an undeniably cute dog will help draw more core customers--males between the ages of 18 and 34. The Irvine-based company on Monday unveiled the first of five new ads featuring the Chihuahua, which joined the company's ad campaign in July.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1997 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taco Bell Corp. on Wednesday introduced a $200-million advertising campaign--replete with pink-clad wrestlers and Chihuahua dogs--that's designed to build sales among 18- to 24-year-old males who dominate the fast-food market. The quirky campaign designed by new Taco Bell advertising agency TBWA Chiat/Day marks a significant change for the chain, which had been pitching its fare at a broader market with the "Nothing Ordinary About It" campaign.
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a commercial world where frogs croak for a brewery and a bunny drums up business for a battery company, it's probably no surprise that a Chihuahua would end up barking about tacos for Taco Bell Corp. But not even advertising industry executives who created the quirky ad campaign guessed how popular the "Yo quiero Taco Bell" (I want Taco Bell) ads would become.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1999 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a commercial world where frogs croak for a brewery and a bunny drums up business for a battery company, it's probably no surprise that a Chihuahua would end up barking about tacos for Taco Bell Corp. But not even advertising industry executives who created the quirky ad campaign guessed how popular the "Yo quiero Taco Bell" (I want Taco Bell) ads would become.
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