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Vada Pinson

SPORTS
March 3, 2007
T.J. Simers pretending to know baseball is a bit disturbing, sort of like Shaquille O'Neal conducting free-throw seminars, or Britney Spears giving marital advice. With all due respect to Maury Wills, his 104 stolen bases in 1962 aren't going to get him into the Hall of Fame. In 1961, he stole 35 bases; in 1963, he stole 40. Although he shattered Ty Cobb's record, many voters regarded his achievement as a fluke. Do I personally think Wills belongs in the Hall? Yes. But on the basis of his .281 batting average and 1,067 runs scored -- and not until the underrated Vada Pinson and Gil Hodges get there first.
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SPORTS
October 7, 1991 | Associated Press
Pitcher Neal Heaton, a member of the 1990 All-Star team, was among three players cut from the Pittsburgh Pirates' postseason roster. Manager Jim Leyland also dropped pitcher Vicente Palacios and catcher Tom Prince as the Pirates began preparations for the National League playoffs against the Atlanta Braves. Shortstop Tony Fernandez of the San Diego Padres will undergo surgery on his right thumb today.
SPORTS
October 21, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it was over, at 12:34 a.m., most of the fans were drained. They'd just seen what many have called the greatest World Series game ever. It was Game 6, Cincinnati vs. Boston, at Fenway Park. The Red Sox won it 7-6 on Carlton Fisk's 12th-inning home run that hit the yellow foul pole, a blow treasured in the hearts of Red Sox fans just as is Bill Mazeroski's 1960 home run that won the Series for the Pittsburgh Pirates.
SPORTS
August 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Jim Palmer and Joe Morgan took a slightly different route to baseball immortality today. The induction ceremonies are usually held outside, allowing the Hall of Famers to bask in the sun and the glory. But two straight days of heavy rain forced a change in the program. Palmer and Morgan made their induction speeches from the stage of the Cooperstown high school auditorium, with Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Stan Musial and Willie Stargell sitting with them.
SPORTS
July 27, 1994 | MARYANN HUDSON
Barry Bonds stole the 300th base of his career in the first inning and promptly picked up the second-base bag. He handed it to his father, Bobby Bonds, who gave it to a batboy to take into the clubhouse. But the Giants couldn't get another base right away, so it was put back until after the inning, when it was exchanged. Bonds became the sixth player in major league history to hit 250 home runs and steal 300 bases.
SPORTS
October 10, 1995 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Halfway through the individual event finals at the World Gymnastics Championships at Sabae, Japan, the hopes of the American women were dashed by injuries. Shannon Miller finished seventh in the uneven parallel bars Monday but withdrew from the vault because of a foot injury. Kerri Strug also withdrew from the vault after hurting her right ankle during warm-ups. The men fared slightly better. Mihai Bagiu of Albuquerque, who tied for fifth on the pommel horse, was the highest American finisher.
SPORTS
January 9, 1996 | Ross Newhan
It may be easier to resolve the budget dispute than get elected to the baseball Hall of Fame. Phil Niekro and Don Sutton, the only 300-game winners not in the Hall, have failed again. So have Tony Perez, Ron Santo, Jim Rice and Steve Garvey. In election results announced Monday, no one received the required 75% of the votes cast. This was only the seventh time--the first since 1971--that eligible members of the Baseball Writers Assn. of America failed to elect a candidate.
SPORTS
December 8, 2008 | JERRY CROWE
Joan Hodges tries not to build her hopes up too high. Maybe that way, if disappointment and heartbreak rap once again upon the door of Gil Hodges' widow, they won't sting quite as much. Her late husband, a slugging, smooth-fielding first baseman who helped the Dodgers win World Series championships in Brooklyn and Los Angeles, could be introduced today in Las Vegas as a baseball Hall of Famer, ending a long and sometimes painful wait for family, friends and fans.
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