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Vadim V Zagladin

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NEWS
October 29, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Anatoly F. Dobrynin, a former Soviet ambassador to the United States, was named Friday as a foreign policy adviser to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev only a month after being abruptly retired in a realignment of the Kremlin leadership. Dobrynin, 68, who returned in 1986 from 24 years in Washington, was credited with a major role in shaping Gorbachev's approach to foreign policy, particularly in formulating the breakthroughs in Soviet relations with the United States.
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NEWS
October 29, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Anatoly F. Dobrynin, a former Soviet ambassador to the United States, was named Friday as a foreign policy adviser to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev only a month after being abruptly retired in a realignment of the Kremlin leadership. Dobrynin, 68, who returned in 1986 from 24 years in Washington, was credited with a major role in shaping Gorbachev's approach to foreign policy, particularly in formulating the breakthroughs in Soviet relations with the United States.
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NEWS
November 19, 1988 | From Reuters
A Soviet official said Friday that 52 people remain in prison or exile for offenses regarded by the West as political but that their cases are all under review. Vadim V. Zagladin, an adviser to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, said at a joint news conference with U.S. congressmen that under new legislation, the offenses most were charged with "will no longer be considered as crimes." His figures appeared to mark a move toward Western estimates of Soviet political prisoners.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
A senior Soviet official said Tuesday that the recently approved Soviet-American treaty aimed at scrapping ground-launched intermediate-range missiles will be dealt with in an unusual manner by Soviet lawmakers. Vadim V.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union's own errors in foreign policy and defense strategy brought it into unnecessary conflict with the West over the past two decades, senior government and Communist Party officials acknowledged here Saturday. The Soviet Union was often blinded to the realities of international relations by its own ideology, they said, and as a result acted in ways that heightened or prolonged tension with the West. "In diplomacy, we allowed ourselves to be carried away by polemics," Yuli M.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as the leaders of Europe pronounced the Cold War over and the dangers posed by four decades of East-West rivalry ended with the signing of the new Charter of Paris on Wednesday, they saw a new threat rising--that of instability in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
January 6, 1985 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Returning in a boisterous mood from a New Year's celebration in Red Square, a group of young Soviet citizens spotted the distinctive license plate of an American car. They jeered. The American driver, however, shouted a New Year's greeting in Russian-- "Novim godom" --and the jeers changed to cheers. No great significance should be read into this casual holiday encounter.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev pledged a new relationship of cooperation with the United States and its Western allies Monday, but he immediately made clear that for Moscow it will not be a me-too partnership. Declaring the Persian Gulf crisis a "grave test" for those framing the new international order, Gorbachev nevertheless refused to give President Bush an immediate go-ahead for the use of military force to oust Iraq from Kuwait.
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