Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVagabond
IN THE NEWS

Vagabond

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1985 | STEVEN SMITH
The Vagabond Theatre, a Los Angeles revival house at 2509 Wilshire Blvd., which closed Nov. 29, will reopen early next year under new management, according to owner Sid Kurstin. "It's going to be fixed up, remodeled, with new carpeting added," Kurstin said. "Everything is going to be first class." Kurstin, owner of the theater's master lease, says a sublease should be completed by next week. With its new management still undetermined, the Vagabond's new movie format remains unknown.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2011 | By Richard Cromelin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Wanna buy a song for a dime?" For many startled UCLA students and Sunset Strip sightseers in the 1960s, that was the way Larry "Wild Man" Fischer introduced himself. Anyone who took him up on his offer was rewarded with a brief, bellowing burst of nursery-rhyme-like verse, punctuated with unpredictable yelps and vocal sound effects from the disheveled troubadour. Despite his unconventional approach and a lifelong struggle with severe mental illness, Fischer, who died Thursday of heart failure at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center at age 66, went on to release several albums and became a cult figure — admired by some as an untamed practitioner of "outsider" art, but regarded less kindly by those who encountered the mercurial musician's sudden bursts of aggression.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By Robert Abele
At least when Peter Pan refused to grow up, we got flying, island peril, heroism and pirates as part of the package. With "Waiting for Forever," an insipid contemporary fairy tale about a lovestruck young vagabond shadowing a childhood sweetheart he can't bring himself to approach, we get stalking, juggling and cancer. Happy Valentine's Day! It's rare to find a movie protagonist who singularly fails on every count to be a compelling, sympathetic or even understandable figure, but dopey street performer Will (Tom Sturridge)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By Robert Abele
At least when Peter Pan refused to grow up, we got flying, island peril, heroism and pirates as part of the package. With "Waiting for Forever," an insipid contemporary fairy tale about a lovestruck young vagabond shadowing a childhood sweetheart he can't bring himself to approach, we get stalking, juggling and cancer. Happy Valentine's Day! It's rare to find a movie protagonist who singularly fails on every count to be a compelling, sympathetic or even understandable figure, but dopey street performer Will (Tom Sturridge)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1997
We appreciate very much the Jan. 22 article "Vigil Honors Life of Man Fatally Shot." It serves as an ode to a young man whose death would now not be in vain if the message will be understood: Here is a man who is a hero by giving up his own life to save a life, and he was leading others into the righteous fold. There is just one item that I request that you, please, correct. In the 10th paragraph of the article it referred to me as "Victorio, himself a former street thug . . . " I feel that the use of the word "thug" (as defined in dictionaries)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1986 | LIANNE STEVENS
It was a dark and stormy night. . . . Snoopy isn't the only writer who has longed to leave that terrific opening on the page. But it takes a roaring talent like George M. Cohan to back up that first cliche with pages more and still send his audience off with delighted smiles crinkling their faces.
SPORTS
October 9, 1985 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
Jeff Laufenberg, who doubles as Babe Laufenberg's agent and oldest brother, was sitting at home two Sundays ago, icing the little finger on his right hand. The pinky was dislocated during a game of catch earlier in the day, having been struck by a football thrown by Babe during a workout at Westchester High. As Babe and his younger brother, John, continued to work out, Jeff was at home nursing the injury when the phone rang. It was the San Diego Chargers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | DAN BERGER
Beer is America's historical beverage of choice for picnics. To me, however, wine can offer more. Even jug wine. The only drawback is the logistical problem of getting it--and all its accouterments--to the location in good order. After all, good wine isn't usually found in cans. And often it's not until you're at some remote spot ready to dole out the smoked salmon that anyone realizes there's a problem. To begin with, there's Murphy's wine law: No matter how good the planning, there's never a corkscrew around.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1985 | JOHN M. WILSON
After a decade showing movie classics of the 1930s and 1940s, the Vagabond Theatre will fade out Saturday night, the latest casualty of the videocassette revolution. Owner Tom Cooper, whose lease at 2509 Wilshire Blvd. ends this month, has scheduled "The Best of Warner Bros. Cartoons" for the Vagabond's final two nights. Complete shows on Saturday will begin at 2, 4:45 and 7:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2005 | Don Shirley
MANY L.A. cineastes have fond memories of the Vagabond, the MacArthur Park-adjacent theater where you could see a pair of vintage Technicolor musicals one week and some latter-day art house fare the next. It closed in the early '90s, but now plans are afoot to bring it back. Only this time it's going legit. Specifically, the Wilshire Boulevard building is being converted into the Hayworth Theatre Center, a four-space venue for live performances slated to open in March.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
There's an irony in the title of the documentary "Surfwise" that may not immediately be apparent. Because this story of a man who, as a TV news segment explains, "gave up being a doctor to travel with his family in a tiny camper from one wave to another," is an honest look at a complicated human situation, it turns out to be a darker film than might be expected. That family consists of 85-year-old Dorian "Doc" Paskowitz, his wife, Juliette, and their nine children (eight sons and a daughter).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2007 | Yxta Maya Murray, Special to The Times
GREGORY Rodriguez's brilliant book on Mexican and Mexican American identity, "Mongrels, Bastards, Orphans, and Vagabonds: Mexican Immigration and the Future of Race in America," threatens my secret dream that I am a direct descendant of some feather-clad Aztec warrior princess who ruled over a Mexica queendom circa 1500.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2005 | Don Shirley
MANY L.A. cineastes have fond memories of the Vagabond, the MacArthur Park-adjacent theater where you could see a pair of vintage Technicolor musicals one week and some latter-day art house fare the next. It closed in the early '90s, but now plans are afoot to bring it back. Only this time it's going legit. Specifically, the Wilshire Boulevard building is being converted into the Hayworth Theatre Center, a four-space venue for live performances slated to open in March.
TRAVEL
December 8, 2002 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
There are two approaches to holiday gift selection. The first requires that you put yourself in the place of the recipient and contemplate what he or she might like. In the second, you say, "Oh, the heck with it," and buy something you want. For me, that means travel stuff, which is often specially designed for vagabonds. Sometimes, though, the best travel accessories are ordinary all-purpose items that have important applications for travelers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1997
We appreciate very much the Jan. 22 article "Vigil Honors Life of Man Fatally Shot." It serves as an ode to a young man whose death would now not be in vain if the message will be understood: Here is a man who is a hero by giving up his own life to save a life, and he was leading others into the righteous fold. There is just one item that I request that you, please, correct. In the 10th paragraph of the article it referred to me as "Victorio, himself a former street thug . . . " I feel that the use of the word "thug" (as defined in dictionaries)
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boo!, as he calls himself, doesn't have shoes. "You get used to it," says the 27-year-old veteran traveler as he stands on the edge of the central plaza of Arcata. He also has no job. "I don't answer to a clock. I go where I want to go." He does, however, have a filthy, graffiti-stained station wagon--which at the moment is filled with fellow travelers and a steaming vat of oatmeal that Boo! commandeered from sympathetic donors. His hungry friends eat from tin bowls.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russ Meyer Film Festival, which opened Sunday at the Vagabond, continues tonight with the hilarious "Mudhoney" (1966). Unspoiled by either sadism or obscenity, this 1966 expose of love among poor whites is the perfect dirty movie and a flawless piece of camp (probably on purpose). No one projects heterosexual male sex fantasies with greater gusto and resolute dedication than Meyer, who at heart is a puritan and who has always been a bigger tease than any burlesque queen.
NEWS
December 17, 1995
His father was a flamboyant con man: He was expelled from college yet claimed to be a graduate of Yale and the Sorbonne. He was a writer of bogus resumes, a passer of bad checks, a defrauder of innkeepers, a car thief. Growing up, Geoffrey Wolff spent his childhood on the move. Depending on the state of his father's fortunes, home was anything from a fleabag boarding house to a lakeside estate. "I think I figured out once that I went to 10 schools in the first 12 years. We were always leaving town a rope's length ahead of the posse," says Wolff, 58, the new director of the graduate fiction program at UC Irvine.
BOOKS
July 23, 1995 | Lynell George, Lynell George is a Times staff writer and author of "No Crystal Stair: African Americans in the City of Angeles."
Dany Laferriere is not a black writer. And, though its cover promises so, nor is his svelte, matte-black volume, "Why Must a Black Writer Write About Sex?" a novel. "As I write these words," Laferriere confides, tone confessional, "I think of Rene Magritte painting a pipe and adding the caption. 'This is not a pipe.' " Traveling this territory, remember, the objects in the mirror are much closer than they appear. Shuck away expectations.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|