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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between 1975 and '85 Tom Cooper ran the venerable mid-city Vagabond Theater on Wilshire Boulevard, presenting in repertory a treasure trove of movies from Hollywood's Golden Era. After a six-year absence he is back at the Vagabond, which he reopens today with a timely retrospective in honor of Frank Capra, who died Sept. 3. The 18-film series commences with "It's a Wonderful Life" and "Arsenic and Old Lace."
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NEWS
January 16, 1992 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Lewis was waiting. He had been expecting this. He loped across the coaches' office at St. John Bosco High School and switched off the television. "Oprah" would have to wait, it was time to talk--again. "I knew this was coming. It was just a matter of when," Lewis said. The inevitable was Lewis coaching basketball, not playing it. He is an assistant coach for the Braves, another interesting twist in an already interesting story.
BOOKS
July 23, 1995 | Lynell George, Lynell George is a Times staff writer and author of "No Crystal Stair: African Americans in the City of Angeles."
Dany Laferriere is not a black writer. And, though its cover promises so, nor is his svelte, matte-black volume, "Why Must a Black Writer Write About Sex?" a novel. "As I write these words," Laferriere confides, tone confessional, "I think of Rene Magritte painting a pipe and adding the caption. 'This is not a pipe.' " Traveling this territory, remember, the objects in the mirror are much closer than they appear. Shuck away expectations.
BOOKS
August 7, 1994 | Wayne Koestenbaum, Wayne Koestenbaum is the author of "The Queen's Throat: Opera, Homosexuality, and the Mystery of Desire," and two collections of poetry, including the recently published "Rhapsodies of a Repeat Offender."
What would homosexuality be, without its penumbra of covert locations? The genius of George Chauncey's "Gay New York" is its respect for vanished bathhouses, tearooms and saloons where gays cruised and commingled; its respect for homosexualities of the street corner, pier and park--all those lost, aromatic rendezvous.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boo!, as he calls himself, doesn't have shoes. "You get used to it," says the 27-year-old veteran traveler as he stands on the edge of the central plaza of Arcata. He also has no job. "I don't answer to a clock. I go where I want to go." He does, however, have a filthy, graffiti-stained station wagon--which at the moment is filled with fellow travelers and a steaming vat of oatmeal that Boo! commandeered from sympathetic donors. His hungry friends eat from tin bowls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2011 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Catherine Mulholland, a historian whose biography of her grandfather William Mulholland sought to correct the image of the man who was sometimes vilified for his central role in bringing water to Southern California, died of natural causes Wednesday at her Camarillo home. She was 88 and had been in decline for several months, her family said. Mulholland was one of the last two grandchildren of the rugged Irish immigrant who oversaw the construction of the 230-mile aqueduct that carries water from the Owens Valley to Los Angeles.
NEWS
January 11, 1987 | PEG McENTEE, Associated Press
Nicole Baker remembers one of the nights that Gary Gilmore stole into her dreams. She called him a fool, this murderous lover she once tried to join in death, and he vanished without a word. In the 10 years since Gilmore was executed, the woman he loved has found God. She has not found peace. "The things I went through are still in me," Baker said. "I still feel them sometimes, like on a cold winter morning, I look out the window and I get that same lonely feeling I felt when I . . .
MAGAZINE
June 14, 1987 | ALAN PRENDERGAST, Alan Prendergast is the author of "The Poison Tree: A True Story of Family Terror," to be published in paperback this summer by Avon.
"HEN-REE!HEN-REE!" Henry Rollins walks briskly to the front of the small church, a blur of muscle and tattoos. It is a stormy Saturday night in Denver, the last stop on Rollins' three-week, coast-to-coast "spoken word" tour before his return to Los Angeles. The crowd of about 200 is an unlikely combination of neatly dressed college students, bohemian hipsters, bearded biker types and a few mohawk-crested punks. One ardent fan calls out as Rollins passes by: "Hen-reeee!"
BUSINESS
September 15, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
To understand what makes Skip Brittenham one of the most powerful entertainment attorneys in the country, picture him fly-fishing. Standing thigh-deep in one of his favorite roaring rivers, he knows just how to gauge where the biggest trout will be and which fly will catch its attention. Most important, he knows precisely when to strike.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1985 | John M. Wilson
Question: What was probably the only movie Clark Gable ever made for Warner Bros.? Answer: "Night Nurse," a mystery filmed in 1931. (No, he didn't play the title role--that was Barbara Stanwyck.) It's part of the Vagabond Theatre's series of Warners classics running Oct. 20-Nov.
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