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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2006 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court appeared dubious Tuesday that a former writers' assistant for the television show "Friends" suffered sexual harassment because of raunchy, sexual comments the show's writers made while producing scripts. During a hearing in Sacramento, two of the state high court's justices observed that Amaani Lyle, 32, was warned before she was hired for "Friends" that she would be subjected to sexually explicit talk in the writers' room. Warner Bros. Television Productions Inc.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
September 13, 2012 | Meghan Daum
It's a strange time to be a woman. I say this not because state legislatures enacted no less than 95 restrictions on reproductive rights this year. I say it not because at the same time, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker repealed his state's equal pay law and Wisconsin state Sen. Glenn Grothman conjectured that "money is more important for men. " Or because, just last month, an alarming number of male legislators demonstrated serious confusion about the birds and the bees. I'm saying it because Naomi Wolf has written a book about her vagina.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2003 | Gary Cohn, Carla Hall and Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writers
Six women who came into contact with Arnold Schwarzenegger on movie sets, in studio offices and in other settings over the last three decades say he touched them in a sexual manner without their consent. In interviews with The Times, three of the women described their surprise and discomfort when Schwarzenegger grabbed their breasts. A fourth said he reached under her skirt and gripped her buttocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
"Vagina: A New Biography" by Naomi Wolf (Ecco / 400 pages / $27.99 ) "The End of Men - and the Rise of Women" by Hanna Rosin (Riverhead / 320 pages / $27.95) In June, Republican state representatives in Michigan silenced Democratic colleague Lisa Brown for using the V-word during discussion of an abortion bill. Afterward, Rep. Mike Callton refused to utter the word. "What she said was offensive," he said. "It was so offensive, I don't even want to say it in front of women. I would not say that in mixed company.
NEWS
September 12, 1998
1995: Initial Sexual Encounters Monica Lewinsky began her White House employment as an intern in the Chief of Staff's office in July 1995. At White House functions in the following months, she made eye contact with the President. During the November 1995 government shutdown, the President invited her to his private study, where they kissed. Later that evening, they had a more intimate sexual encounter. They had another sexual encounter two days later, and a third one on New Year's Eve. A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The body part that dare not speak its name -- at least in certain Michigan political circles -- was the talk of an impromptu production Monday night. State Rep. Lisa Brown, the Democratic lawmaker who said she was barred from speaking in the Michigan House for saying "vagina," took part in a production of "The Vagina Monologues" on the steps of the state Capitol. A dozen lawmakers and actresses joined Brown for the performance in front of a crowd of 3,000 people -- thanks, in part, to the well-“liked” Facebook event page, Vaginas Take Back the Capitol!
MAGAZINE
October 30, 2005 | Kyle Zirpolo, as told to Debbie Nathan, Kyle Zirpolo is a 30-year-old former McMartin Pre-School student who now manages a supermarket on California's central coast. Debbie Nathan is a writer in New York and coauthor, with appellate attorney Michael Snedeker, of "Satan's Silence: Ritual Abuse and the Making of a Modern American Witch Hunt." She also is a board member of the National Center for Reason and Justice, a nonprofit group that works to educate the public about people falsely charged with child abuse.
INTRODUCTION * Twenty-one years ago, a child then known as Kyle Sapp told police that he had been the victim of sexual abuse at the McMartin Pre-School in Manhattan Beach. Sapp, who attended the preschool from 1979 to 1980, was 8 when he first talked to authorities in 1984. He and hundreds of other South Bay children made allegations against the family who ran McMartin and against the employees who worked there.
NEWS
February 16, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Turns out there might just be such a thing as too much hygiene. Women in Africa who wash out their vaginas with soap or clean it out using cloth or paper are more at risk of contracting HIV, according to a new study in PLoS Medicine. The international team of researchers looked at data pulled from 13 studies involving 14,874 women, 791 of whom ended up with HIV. The women reported whether they used any particular methods to clean, tighten or dry out their vaginas. After controlling for age, marital status and the number of sexual partners the women had had in the past three months, the authors found women were about one and a half times as likely to acquire HIV if they used a cloth or paper to wipe out their vaginas, and one and a quarter times as likely to become infected if they used soap to clean it out. Women who washed their vaginas with soap were also more likely to have bacterial vaginosis or disrupted vaginal flora (as in, a disruption in the normal, healthy balance of microbes that live in the vagina and protect it from disease)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
When Eve Ensler opened her play "The Vagina Monologues" off-Broadway in 1996, people who called the box office to order tickets were afraid to name it. Motorists complained about highway billboards advertising it. Some newscasters wouldn't utter the title of the show. "Everybody told me to change the title," Ensler said. "'You're never gonna get this play done.' The whole idea was that you made a political and artistic choice to go see a play called 'The Vagina Monologues.' I used to say 'vagina' was more dangerous than Scud missiles or plutonium.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Let's talk about vaginas," Kristin Johnston says bluntly on the other end of the phone. Unapologetic, ready for whatever. It was a dare, sort of. What Johnston really wants to talk about is Eve Ensler's play "The Vagina Monologues," one of the most forthrightly graphic pieces of literature ever to discuss the subject of women's anatomy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The body part that dare not speak its name -- at least in certain Michigan political circles -- was the talk of an impromptu production Monday night. State Rep. Lisa Brown, the Democratic lawmaker who said she was barred from speaking in the Michigan House for saying "vagina," took part in a production of "The Vagina Monologues" on the steps of the state Capitol. A dozen lawmakers and actresses joined Brown for the performance in front of a crowd of 3,000 people -- thanks, in part, to the well-“liked” Facebook event page, Vaginas Take Back the Capitol!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
When Eve Ensler opened her play "The Vagina Monologues" off-Broadway in 1996, people who called the box office to order tickets were afraid to name it. Motorists complained about highway billboards advertising it. Some newscasters wouldn't utter the title of the show. "Everybody told me to change the title," Ensler said. "'You're never gonna get this play done.' The whole idea was that you made a political and artistic choice to go see a play called 'The Vagina Monologues.' I used to say 'vagina' was more dangerous than Scud missiles or plutonium.
NEWS
February 16, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Turns out there might just be such a thing as too much hygiene. Women in Africa who wash out their vaginas with soap or clean it out using cloth or paper are more at risk of contracting HIV, according to a new study in PLoS Medicine. The international team of researchers looked at data pulled from 13 studies involving 14,874 women, 791 of whom ended up with HIV. The women reported whether they used any particular methods to clean, tighten or dry out their vaginas. After controlling for age, marital status and the number of sexual partners the women had had in the past three months, the authors found women were about one and a half times as likely to acquire HIV if they used a cloth or paper to wipe out their vaginas, and one and a quarter times as likely to become infected if they used soap to clean it out. Women who washed their vaginas with soap were also more likely to have bacterial vaginosis or disrupted vaginal flora (as in, a disruption in the normal, healthy balance of microbes that live in the vagina and protect it from disease)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2008 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Grover Cleveland High School Principal Bob Marks has his limits. On Thursday, it was the labeled diagram of a vagina splashed across the front page of the student newspaper's Valentine's Day issue. Flustered teachers rushed to confiscate the publication, but with some copies already in circulation and the Reseda campus in an uproar, it quickly became a hot read for the school's roughly 3,700 students. And some of the contraband issues made their way home, getting a quick reaction from parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | Katie Nguyen, Reuters
Cracking jokes and passing around chocolates, a group of Kenyan performers gathers in a Nairobi school to rehearse Eve Ensler's "The Vagina Monologues." One actress takes to the softly lit stage and speaks into the microphone: "Let's just start with the word 'vagina.' It sounds like an infection at best, maybe a medical instrument. It's a totally ridiculous, completely unsexy word."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2003 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
Forget about performance art, the women are told at the write-your-own-version of "The Vagina Monologues" workshop. No one should try to replicate Lara Flynn Boyle's or Julianna Margulies' provocative odes to sex or any of the other monologues that were read by stars in Eve Ensler's theatrical production, drama therapist Blair Glaser tells participants at workshops around the country. Instead, Glaser, who will hold the one-day workshop in Malibu on Saturday, keeps the focus on sexuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2003 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
Forget about performance art, the women are told at the write-your-own-version of "The Vagina Monologues" workshop. No one should try to replicate Lara Flynn Boyle's or Julianna Margulies' provocative odes to sex or any of the other monologues that were read by stars in Eve Ensler's theatrical production, drama therapist Blair Glaser tells participants at workshops around the country. Instead, Glaser, who will hold the one-day workshop in Malibu on Saturday, keeps the focus on sexuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | Katie Nguyen, Reuters
Cracking jokes and passing around chocolates, a group of Kenyan performers gathers in a Nairobi school to rehearse Eve Ensler's "The Vagina Monologues." One actress takes to the softly lit stage and speaks into the microphone: "Let's just start with the word 'vagina.' It sounds like an infection at best, maybe a medical instrument. It's a totally ridiculous, completely unsexy word."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2002 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the raucous musical comedy "The Full Monty" continues to dance over the surface of male sexuality at the 1,600-seat Ahmanson Theatre, "The Vagina Monologues," Eve Ensler's probing social commentary on the mystique surrounding the female genitalia, closed Sunday at the 280-seat Coronet Theatre on La Cienega.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Let's talk about vaginas," Kristin Johnston says bluntly on the other end of the phone. Unapologetic, ready for whatever. It was a dare, sort of. What Johnston really wants to talk about is Eve Ensler's play "The Vagina Monologues," one of the most forthrightly graphic pieces of literature ever to discuss the subject of women's anatomy.
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