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Vaginal Davis

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
He starts the day at 6:30 a.m. in boy drag -- khakis, a black T-shirt -- standing at a bus stop on Hollywood Boulevard like a veteran commuter, a newspaper tucked neatly under his arm. He finishes the day at 3 a.m. in flapper drag -- white drop-waist dress, an auburn bob -- standing on a tiny stage in West Hollywood, spinning jazz records, singing and spewing subversive social critique. This latest persona, the flapper, is Bricktop.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
He starts the day at 6:30 a.m. in boy drag -- khakis, a black T-shirt -- standing at a bus stop on Hollywood Boulevard like a veteran commuter, a newspaper tucked neatly under his arm. He finishes the day at 3 a.m. in flapper drag -- white drop-waist dress, an auburn bob -- standing on a tiny stage in West Hollywood, spinning jazz records, singing and spewing subversive social critique. This latest persona, the flapper, is Bricktop.
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NEWS
April 3, 2003 | Adam Bregman, Special to The Times
Aprofessional-basketball-player-sized drag queen, Vaginal Davis is one of the more unusual and lively hostesses in the L.A. club scene. For five years, she reigned over a Sunday afternoon club at the Garage in Silver Lake, which featured an amazing lineup of bands, accompanied by Davis' hilarious introductions and her frenzied groping of band members.
NEWS
April 3, 2003 | Adam Bregman, Special to The Times
Aprofessional-basketball-player-sized drag queen, Vaginal Davis is one of the more unusual and lively hostesses in the L.A. club scene. For five years, she reigned over a Sunday afternoon club at the Garage in Silver Lake, which featured an amazing lineup of bands, accompanied by Davis' hilarious introductions and her frenzied groping of band members.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
I had to laugh out loud at the juxtaposition of the two stories about current clubs ("No Backing Into Nacional," by Maria Elena Fernandez, and "In Days Gone By," by Adam Bregman, April 3). Here's the contempt of the manager of Paladar toward his clientele, who try to enter this monument to "hipness" through a show of creative punk-rock imagination, thereby circumventing the obligatory groveling to get in to spend their money. They are being denied the chance to stand around posing and giving lots of money to people who refer to them as vermin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2007 | Margaret Wappler
Fusion, Outfest's program of films about LGBTQ people of color and the only festival of its kind, pulls in audiences like no other: Think queer theorists, questioning teenagers, the next generation's Vaginal Davis and, 5of course, your usual entertainment industry professionals. The diverse crowd is a reflection of what's on the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1998 | CLAUDINE ISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Babes," a canny group show at Mark Moore Gallery, features the work of six artists, each of whom playfully deconstructs the so-called feminine mystique. They present us with images of women whose physical attributes are as excessive as they are patently artificial.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2008
Marcus Kuiland-Nazario has long been the go-to person for all things fabulous. An artist, curator and independent producer, he is one of the many founding artists of the 18th Street Arts Center and Highways Performance Space. He is hosting and co-producing the seventh season of MAX10 at the Electric Lodge and guest co-curating the Studio series at REDCAT. The next edition of his 14-year-old live art lab, Pop Tarts, is called "Cinco de Maypole," a conflation of all things May and pole.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | Carolyn Patricia Scott
Teasley finds inspiration in Laurel Canyon. There's "country vibe, that hippie, free-spirit vibe" there, Teasley says, a setting that nurtured Joni Mitchell, the Doors, Frank Zappa and a number of other artists. The place has also worked its way into her debut novel, "Dive," the followup to her well-reviewed 2002 collection of stories, "Glow in the Dark." Her Laurel Canyon home is where Teasley spends much of her weekends, cooking and enjoying her lush backyard.
NEWS
July 2, 2002 | CINDY CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conjure a picture of a famous writer of years past, and chances are that image would include a glass of inebriant--scotch, usually--close at the writer's hand. So what could be more natural than a book reading at a bar? At the Parlour Club in West Hollywood on Sunday night, listeners perched on bar stools and sipped candy-colored martinis as local author Lisa Teasley read from her new collection of short stories, "Glow in the Dark."
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | THE SOCIAL CLIMES STAFF
L. A. is about to be Monked. Michael Lane and Jim Krotty, co-publishers of Monk, the country's only mobile magazine, arrived two months ago to chronicle the best, the worst and the weirdest of L.A. for a special Los Angeles edition of Monk. "Everything you read about L.A.
NEWS
December 6, 1993 | MARK EHRMAN
The Scene: Saturday night at the Park Plaza Hotel for 'Zine Scream!--a gathering of voices from the far-flung fringes of free-expression. The event was "a celebration of 'zinedom and alternative publishing," according to Rodney Sappington, executive director of A.R.T. Press, which hosted the event along with Factsheet 5 ("The definitive guide to the 'zine revolution") and Filmforum. It was also a way to raise money for A.R.T.
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