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Vagrancy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1985 | LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writer
Two years after the U.S. Supreme Court declared California's 111-year-old vagrancy law unconstitutional, Assemblyman Larry Stirling (R-San Diego) has authored a bill that would permit police to question people who wander the streets. Civil liberties lawyers, including some who challenged the old law, say the proposed vagrancy law is no more constitutional than the old one, but local police officials say they would welcome such a statute.
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FOOD
July 21, 2012
Vagrancy Project at Allston Yacht Club info Vagrancy Project at Allston Yacht Club Where: 1320 Echo Park Ave., L.A. When: Seatings at 6:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays. Bar seating from 7 p.m. Price: Prix fixe menu $70 with optional $50 beverage pairing Info: Reservations made through vagrantayc@gmail.com ; http://www.allstonyachtclub.com
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NEWS
May 6, 1987
Republican mayoral candidate Frank L. Rizzo backed off from his proposal that homeless people should be arrested on vagrancy charges, but said they should be forcibly removed from the streets. "It's only a humane act to get them off the streets," said Rizzo, who served as mayor from 1972 to 1980. "We can't have them lying out on the streets." On Sunday, Rizzo told KYW-AM he would arrest the homeless on vagrancy charges.
WORLD
June 19, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
China abolished a 20-year-old vagrancy law that human rights groups said had let police imprison people at will, leading to hundreds of detainees' deaths. Elimination of the law was the latest small but significant political change by Premier Wen Jiabao and President Hu Jintao since they took power in March. The decision followed the highly publicized death in custody of a graphic designer detained in March.
WORLD
June 19, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
China abolished a 20-year-old vagrancy law that human rights groups said had let police imprison people at will, leading to hundreds of detainees' deaths. Elimination of the law was the latest small but significant political change by Premier Wen Jiabao and President Hu Jintao since they took power in March. The decision followed the highly publicized death in custody of a graphic designer detained in March.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The headlines in a couple of Nevada's largest newspapers this week sent shock waves through the state's legalized brothels, and no wonder. "Ooops! Nevada Accidentally Outlaws Brothels," the Reno Gazette Journal blared Thursday. "Brothels Mistakenly Outlawed," was the Page 1 headline in Wednesday's Las Vegas Review-Journal. Its story began: "Nevada has outlawed brothels. Sort of. By mistake." George Flint, lobbyist for the Nevada Brothel Assn., was jarred out of bed by a 3 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1985
During arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court over Edward Lawson's challenge to the California vagrancy statute, Justice Byron R. White pointed to an earlier high court decision that police may not request identification from persons whom they have no reason to suspect of criminal activity. "There is a constitutional right to anonymity," White said. The San Diego Police Department apparently doesn't think so.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1985
There is an enormously important issue to be resolved by the citizens of Los Angeles and their elected leadership: Is the kind of police service they enjoyed during the 1984 Olympic Games worth a few dollars to maintain? Providing safety to people is the government's first obligation. Public safety is not dependent solely upon the number of police officers. Quality of personnel and equipment is far more important than hordes of uniformed bodies. Still, numbers are a factor even though a single magic number has never been precisely determined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1992 | TOM McQUEENEY
Following in the footsteps of several other Orange County cities, the City Council is considering passing a law that would make it illegal for people to camp overnight on city property. Mayor Larry A. Herman brought the idea of an anti-camping law before the council after meeting with mayors and council members from other west Orange County cities who discussed the subject at a monthly issues meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992
Santa Monica City Atty. Robert M. Myers' refusal to prosecute all violators of a new law aimed at keeping people from living in the city's parks has triggered an unsuccessful move to fire him for insubordination. The City Council on Wednesday voted 5-2 against dismissal of their controversial attorney; it also refused to order Myers to prosecute violators of the new law. The law was suggested by the city's homeless task force, endorsed by the police chief and passed by the City Council in April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1998 | COLL METCALFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While a new study indicates that store owners across Southern California feel petty crime is interfering with their businesses, shopkeepers in Ventura County say stepped-up enforcement has made them feel safer. A poll by The Times and USC's Marshall School of Business revealed widespread frustration in the Southern California business community over graffiti vandals, vagrants and thieves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1998 | RICHARD WARCHOL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Officials in this peaceful, bucolic hideaway are debating how best to quell a big-city problem usually left down the hill. At least twice a day, someone calls police complaining about panhandlers on downtown street corners. Or transients using walls, trail sides or ball fields as toilets. Or hanging out at picnic tables and drinking in Sarzotti and Libbey parks, frightening the general public. And so, members of the City Council on Tuesday will consider laying down some laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1998 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A municipal judge ruled Thursday that the Rev. Wiley Drake and his church have taken reasonable steps to comply with city building codes by limiting the number of vagrants on the property to 52, a prosecutor said. Assistant city prosecutor Greg Palmer criticized the decision by Judge Gregg L. Pricket, calling it a double standard that allows the First Southern Baptist Church of Buena Park and its pastor to break the law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Following the lead of several other Orange County cities, Costa Mesa has outlawed camping in public parks. In recent months, the City Council has also cracked down on panhandlers and requested that a local soup kitchen stop serving lunches. Both measures were attempts to stem the flow of vagrants into the city after council members said they had received a number of complaints. Some who attended Tuesday's council meeting, however, took a different view.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The City Council will vote Monday on whether to grant a so-called sober living center the permit it needs to continue operating. The Recovery Center complex at 1110 Victoria St. has 19 two-bedroom apartments that house about 40 recovering drug addicts and alcoholics. Residents of the area have complained that the center is responsible for an increasing amount of vagrancy and crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1994 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Diego man who says homelessness can be ended by putting transients to work espoused his work ethic in speeches around Ventura on Monday, impressing business people with the promise of wiping out vagrancy at a minimum cost. "This country was not built by freeloaders--it was built by hard workers," said Bob McElroy, president of San Diego's Alpha Project for the Homeless. "We can't help people who don't want to help themselves."
NEWS
June 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Criminal charges were dismissed against a man who spent three years living in the attic crawl space of a Thousand Oaks shopping center. His sister, Robin Salcedo, said David Michael Russell, 40, still returns to the neighborhood to carry out his daily routine of picking up trash, pulling weeds, returning shopping carts to a nearby store and recycling cans he collects from the streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1990 | DAVAN MAHARAJ
Linda Fisher has bought all her Christmas presents, distributed her belongings among her friends and relatives, and is waiting to die. Fisher is the 41-year-old amputee and terminally ill cancer victim who sparked a small controversy because she was living in a recreational vehicle parked in front of her cousin's home in San Juan Capistrano. After interviewing Fisher in August, I knocked on her neighbors' doors to find out exactly who had filed the complaint with the city.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The headlines in a couple of Nevada's largest newspapers this week sent shock waves through the state's legalized brothels, and no wonder. "Ooops! Nevada Accidentally Outlaws Brothels," the Reno Gazette Journal blared Thursday. "Brothels Mistakenly Outlawed," was the Page 1 headline in Wednesday's Las Vegas Review-Journal. Its story began: "Nevada has outlawed brothels. Sort of. By mistake." George Flint, lobbyist for the Nevada Brothel Assn., was jarred out of bed by a 3 a.m.
NEWS
June 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Criminal charges were dismissed against a man who spent three years living in the attic crawl space of a Thousand Oaks shopping center. His sister, Robin Salcedo, said David Michael Russell, 40, still returns to the neighborhood to carry out his daily routine of picking up trash, pulling weeds, returning shopping carts to a nearby store and recycling cans he collects from the streets.
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