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Vakhtang Jordania

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2005 | From The Washington Post
Vakhtang Jordania, a prominent Soviet conductor whose post-defection career in the United States never matched his early renown, died Tuesday at his home in Broadway, Va. He was 62 and had cancer. Jordania won the top prize at the 1971 Herbert von Karajan competition for young conductors in Berlin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2005 | From The Washington Post
Vakhtang Jordania, a prominent Soviet conductor whose post-defection career in the United States never matched his early renown, died Tuesday at his home in Broadway, Va. He was 62 and had cancer. Jordania won the top prize at the 1971 Herbert von Karajan competition for young conductors in Berlin.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES
Vakhtang Jordania, last of the three guest conductors to lead the Pacific Symphony this season, may never have been heard of in the United States if he hadn't taken a fateful taxicab ride in 1983. It was then that Jordania and fellow Soviet musician, violinist Viktoria Mullova--on tour in Finland--pulled the fast one they had been planning secretly for years. Eluding official "escorts," they took a taxicab over the border to Sweden, flew to Stockholm and sought asylum at the U.S. Embassy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY
For a marketing whiz like Louis Spisto, the Pacific Symphony's new music director "is as much the product as anyone else, as the orchestra or as the music performed." A committee of musicians, symphony staff and board members, headed by Cal State Fullerton music professor Preston Stedman, has been searching for a successor to outgoing director Keith Clark, primarily through guest performances with the symphony. "We've seen four conductors this season," Spisto said last week, "one of whom did a short stint with us. We have six more coming in. The search committee has met several times this year and has developed a profile.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY
For a marketing whiz like Louis Spisto, the Pacific Symphony's new music director "is as much the product as anyone else, as the orchestra or as the music performed." A committee of musicians, symphony staff and board members, headed by Cal State Fullerton music professor Preston Stedman, has been searching for a successor to outgoing director Keith Clark, primarily through guest performances with the symphony. "We've seen four conductors this season," Spisto said last week, "one of whom did a short stint with us. We have six more coming in. The search committee has met several times this year and has developed a profile.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES
Pacific Symphony officials have announced the following changes or additions in programming and guest artists in the orchestra's 1988 summer concert series and 1988-89 classical subscription season: July 16: At the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre, the Miami-based New World Symphony will join the Pacific Symphony as Eduardo Mata, music director of the Dallas Symphony, conducts Dvorak's "New World" Symphony, Strauss' "Don Juan" and Hindemith's "Symphonic Metamorphoses of Themes by Weber." Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES
Pacific Symphony officials have announced the following changes or additions in programming and guest artists in the orchestra's 1988 summer concert series and 1988-89 classical subscription season: --July 16: The Miami-based New World Symphony will join the Pacific Symphony and conductor Eduardo Mata, music director of the Dallas Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | GREG HETTMANSBERGER
The Pacific Symphony gave its patrons a healthy dose of the music-making basics--an acceptable stylistic approach, correct balance and all the right notes--plus that intangible X-factor--artistic charisma, or call it what you will--on Wednesday night. Guest conductor Vakhtang Jordania opened the program at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa with a robust reading of Rossini's Overture to "La Gazza Ladra."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another holiday season . . . another dull, uninspiring performance of Handel's "Messiah." This time it was Chattanooga Symphony music director Vakhtang Jordania conducting a much-reduced Pacific Symphony, Pacific Chorale and a quartet of uneven soloists Saturday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. Certain period stylistic considerations prevailed, although the work was offered with the usual time-dishonored cuts (perhaps a blessing in this case).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
The Pacific Symphony will enter its second decade with concert programs chosen for the first time by someone other than its founding music director, Keith Clark, who vacates that position in May. The new season, announced Thursday, will include familiar repertory, including Schubert's Symphony No. 9 and Tchaikovsky's Symphony No.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES
Vakhtang Jordania, last of the three guest conductors to lead the Pacific Symphony this season, may never have been heard of in the United States if he hadn't taken a fateful taxicab ride in 1983. It was then that Jordania and fellow Soviet musician, violinist Viktoria Mullova--on tour in Finland--pulled the fast one they had been planning secretly for years. Eluding official "escorts," they took a taxicab over the border to Sweden, flew to Stockholm and sought asylum at the U.S. Embassy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES
Choosing best picks among the many upcoming classical music offerings is, fortunately, an increasingly attractive burden. -- Orchestral: 'Tis the season for three guest conductors to alternate with music director Keith Clark at the helm of the Pacific Symphony at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Each guest will be vying for the permanent position, which Clark vacates next spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
Known primarily as a minimalist, composer Steve Reich insists he has, at last, drawn the maximum out of an orchestra. "I think it's the biggest and best thing I've done," he says proudly of "The Desert Music," which receives its West Coast premiere Saturday night and next Sunday afternoon in Royce Hall, UCLA, with Neal Stulberg conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic. "My early pieces for orchestra didn't give the players that much to do," the 48-year-old New York composer confesses.
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