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Valda Setterfield

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1995 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Families are all happy in the same way, we know from Tolstoy, but unhappy in different ways. Lev Nikolayevich, meet the Gordons. Papa--the mustachioed post-modern choreographer David Gordon--has barrettes in his hair and is wearing a frock and acting like a holy terror. Mama--Valda Setterfield, a stately former Merce Cunningham dancer and now an actress--is in a tizzy. Son--downtown actor, writer and director Ain Gordon--is dealing with it all. They never seem to stop talking or moving.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1995 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Families are all happy in the same way, we know from Tolstoy, but unhappy in different ways. Lev Nikolayevich, meet the Gordons. Papa--the mustachioed post-modern choreographer David Gordon--has barrettes in his hair and is wearing a frock and acting like a holy terror. Mama--Valda Setterfield, a stately former Merce Cunningham dancer and now an actress--is in a tizzy. Son--downtown actor, writer and director Ain Gordon--is dealing with it all. They never seem to stop talking or moving.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1986 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
The David Gordon of American Ballet Theatre fame is undeniably clever and engaging, a fertile choreographic mind to prod the big-time terpsichorean machinery from badly worn grooves. But with his little Pickup Company, which made its local debut Friday at Wadsworth Theater, the New York-based dance-maker beckons a viewer to his other realm--that of post-modern classicism. It is divine.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1986 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
The David Gordon of American Ballet Theatre fame is undeniably clever and engaging, a fertile choreographic mind to prod the big-time terpsichorean machinery from badly worn grooves. But with his little Pickup Company, which made its local debut Friday at Wadsworth Theater, the New York-based dance-maker beckons a viewer to his other realm--that of post-modern classicism. It is divine.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1989 | EILEEN SONDAK
Whoever heard of David Gordon? Not many San Diego dance buffs, judging from the sparse audience on hand Friday night for the local debut of Gordon's Pick Up Co. More's the pity, since this doyen of post-modern dance and his sleek New York-based ensemble offered a strikingly free-flowing sneak preview of "United States," a huge patchwork quilt of a piece scheduled to be premiered at Kennedy Center in September. And, unlike most imported dance works, this evening-long mix of movement, words and music, had ties to San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1987 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
After years of ruinous co-productions with foreign TV networks, PBS' "Dance in America" series reclaims its sense of mission tonight with an episode titled (significantly) "Made in U.S.A" (8 p.m. on Channel 24; 9 p.m. on Channels 28 and 15; Saturday at 9 p.m. on Channel 50). Although the three sections of the hourlong program were all choreographed by David Gordon--and all feature Mikhail Baryshnikov--each has a different origin and style.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
After two of his duets taped in the early '80s are shown on "Alive From Off Center" tonight (at 10 on Channels 28 and 50; at 11 on Channel 24), post-modern dance-maker David Gordon introduces his "Panel," a more recent, non-dance creation that offers playful commentary on middlebrow arts journalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It is the business of every family to care for its dying members, and that is just what the dutiful father and son do in "The Family Business," a serious comedy that attempts to elevate the drudgery of caretaking to the revelation of art. Now at the Mark Taper Forum, "The Family Business" is written and directed by father-and-son David and Ain Gordon. In performance the two are joined by the elegant Valda Setterfield, who is David's real-life wife and Ain's mother.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
David Gordon's "The Mysteries and What's So Funny?" asks all the right questions. At Wadsworth Theater through Sunday, this perpetual-motion piece of musically supported movement tweaks life's abiding conundrums: the mysteries of art, identity, relationships and, not the least, self-importance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1989 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
David Gordon appeared in Los Angeles 13 years ago with a performance collective called Grand Union that got at major perceptual issues through a dazzling array of disciplines and perspectives. His subsequent career in dance (including the 1987 "Made in the U.S.A."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edward Albee's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Three Tall Women" and David and Ain Gordon's "The Family Business" will take two of the first three slots on the Mark Taper Forum's 1995-96 season, joining the previously reported "Slavs!" The choices were announced in a renewal brochure recently mailed to Taper subscribers, along with a list of six plays from which the season's remaining three productions will be chosen. Tony Kushner's "Slavs!
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1987 | ROBERT GRESKOVIC
The Dance Collection of the New York Public Library has taken time to give a name to one of its most popular and extensive assets: the ever-growing store of filmed and videotaped dance documentation. It will hereafter be the Jerome Robbins Archive of the Recorded Moving Image, in honor of the choreographer who continues to be instrumental in its success.
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