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Valdas Adamkus

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1998
Your Feb. 26 article on Lithuania's new president giving up his U.S. citizenship raises the problematic issue of dual citizenship in our country. I always considered U.S. citizenship law highly questionable in allowing one to remain a citizen here after moving to a foreign country, attaining citizenship there and then even serving in its armed forces. Now we learn that Valdas Adamkus apparently could have retained both U.S. and Lithuanian citizenship while serving as president, had he not chosen to give up the former.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1998
Your Feb. 26 article on Lithuania's new president giving up his U.S. citizenship raises the problematic issue of dual citizenship in our country. I always considered U.S. citizenship law highly questionable in allowing one to remain a citizen here after moving to a foreign country, attaining citizenship there and then even serving in its armed forces. Now we learn that Valdas Adamkus apparently could have retained both U.S. and Lithuanian citizenship while serving as president, had he not chosen to give up the former.
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NEWS
January 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A Chicago retiree captured the presidency, narrowly winning a runoff election less than a year after returning to the homeland he fled more than half a century ago. Valdas Adamkus, a 71-year-old former administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, beat former prosecutor general Arturas Paulauskas, 44, by less than 1 percentage point in Sunday's runoff. Final results showed that Adamkus won 49.9% of the vote to Paulauskas' 49.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valdas Adamkus, the federal bureaucrat from Chicago who was elected president of Lithuania, formally gave up his U.S. citizenship Wednesday, one day before his scheduled swearing-in. Adamkus, 71, is to take the oath of office in Parliament today, then celebrate his inauguration at a rally in central Vilnius and a Mass in the capital's landmark cathedral. With his victory in January, the former regional administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency became the first U.S.
NEWS
January 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The American retiree who won Lithuania's presidency this week plans to give up his American citizenship. "The rest of my life will be devoted to Lithuania," Valdas Adamkus, 71, said. Adamkus was born in Lithuania but fled as a teenager as the country was forcibly absorbed into the Soviet Union. After several years in Germany, he went to the United States, where he obtained an engineering degree.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | From Reuters
Valdas Adamkus, a Lithuanian American, defeated a former prosecutor general by a wafer-thin margin today to win Lithuania's presidential runoff election. Final results from Sunday's voting gave 72-year-old Adamkus 49.90% to Arturas Paulauskas' 49.29%, the Electoral Commission said. The presidential post in the Baltic state is largely ceremonial, but the holder appoints the prime minister and can send legislation back to Parliament for amendments.
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months ago, Valdas Adamkus was a high-ranking Environmental Protection Agency official in Chicago. He commuted to work every day from the suburb of Hinsdale and worried about things like water quality and toxic waste. Today, his picture is plastered on kiosks and bus shelters all over Lithuania along with the slogan "Free men, an open society and a strong nation."
WORLD
December 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
President Valdas Adamkus, who guided the former Soviet republic of Lithuania to expected membership in the European Union and NATO, failed to win 50% of the vote in his bid for reelection. Adamkus will face former Prime Minister Rolandas Paksas on Jan. 5. Adamkus, a former U.S. citizen, enjoyed high approval ratings. The 76-year-old helped garner invitations into the EU and North Atlantic Treaty Organization earlier this year but failed to overcome a large field of candidates and low turnout.
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Political novice Arturas Paulauskas triumphed in the first round of Lithuania's presidential elections but was heading for a tough runoff with former Chicago resident Valdas Adamkus. With 64% of the vote counted, Paulauskas, 44, had garnered 45.3%. But without a majority, Paulauskas was set to face fellow political newcomer Adamkus, 71, who polled 27.6%, in a runoff Jan. 4.
NEWS
February 15, 1989
The Environmental Protection Agency has barred its employees from visiting the government's uranium processing facility in Ohio because of the risk of exposure to radioactivity, a spokeswoman confirmed.
NEWS
January 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A Chicago retiree captured the presidency, narrowly winning a runoff election less than a year after returning to the homeland he fled more than half a century ago. Valdas Adamkus, a 71-year-old former administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, beat former prosecutor general Arturas Paulauskas, 44, by less than 1 percentage point in Sunday's runoff. Final results showed that Adamkus won 49.9% of the vote to Paulauskas' 49.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | From Reuters
Valdas Adamkus, a Lithuanian American, defeated a former prosecutor general by a wafer-thin margin today to win Lithuania's presidential runoff election. Final results from Sunday's voting gave 72-year-old Adamkus 49.90% to Arturas Paulauskas' 49.29%, the Electoral Commission said. The presidential post in the Baltic state is largely ceremonial, but the holder appoints the prime minister and can send legislation back to Parliament for amendments.
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months ago, Valdas Adamkus was a high-ranking Environmental Protection Agency official in Chicago. He commuted to work every day from the suburb of Hinsdale and worried about things like water quality and toxic waste. Today, his picture is plastered on kiosks and bus shelters all over Lithuania along with the slogan "Free men, an open society and a strong nation."
NEWS
February 15, 1989
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and its counterpart at the state level have barred their employees from visiting the federal government's uranium processing facility in southwest Ohio because of the risk of exposure to radioactivity, a spokeswoman confirmed.
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