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NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
With an estimated 50 feet of snow blocking the only highway into town, the 4,000 residents of Valdez, Alaska, will be cut off indefinitely, officials say, leaving access only by air or by sea. As many as a dozen avalanches came down on the 360-mile Richardson Highway to Fairbanks on Friday, officials said, including one that dammed a river and created a lake up to half a mile long across the road. The highway cannot be cleared until water behind the snow drains, state transportation officials say. “At this time, there is no safe way to approach relieving that water,” Jason Sakalaskas, a maintenance engineer, said at a news teleconference Monday, according to the Associated Press . The avalanches came in an area known locally as Snow Slide Path, said Mike Coffey, another maintenance engineer for the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 12, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
- On a night when the toll of a lengthy boxing career was going to be tested in another multimillion-dollar world-title fight, the promise of a limitless future in the sport was also displayed. Oscar Valdez, a 23-year-old two-time Olympian from Nogales, Mexico, who trains in Santa Fe Springs, won his first belt, the North American Boxing Federation super-featherweight title, with a fourth-round knockout of Florida's Adrian Perez, 33, on Saturday. "Everything we practiced in the gym we showed in the ring today," Valdez (10-0, 10 knockouts)
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NATIONAL
February 7, 2014 | By Paresh Dave, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Ah, the open road: The lone highway into Valdez, Alaska, is finally clear, but residents say being cut off by land wasn't that big of a deal. Six miles of the Richardson Highway in and out of the town of 4,000 people were shut down for about 11 days because of multiple avalanches that dropped snow 50 feet high onto the lanes. Truck shipments and other travel were shifted to ships and airplanes. "Alaska is resilient," said Valdez resident Colleen Stephens. Although it reduced the town's independence, she said, "Did it really alter how we live our daily lives?
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Some lessons take a long time to sink in. The Exxon Valdez disaster, which occurred 25 years ago this week when the oil tanker struck a reef in Alaska's Prince William Sound, was both the product of previous lessons unlearned and the source of new lessons that continue to be overlooked. One lesson was that industry self-regulation and lax governmental oversight don't work to the public's benefit. In this case, the vessel was operating on March 24, 1989, with an overworked crew that was half the size of standard crews 20 years earlier; the tanker's hull construction didn't meet specifications agreed to by the oil industry for tankers carrying Alaskan oil. The Coast Guard, which was charged with conducting safety inspections  of tankers, didn't do so because its staff had been cut by one-third.  The environmental effects of the spilled oil in what was then the largest ever in U.S. waters--it was surpassed by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico--have been worse and longer lasting than anyone anticipated.
SPORTS
August 2, 1985 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
When Steve Valdez weighed himself in 1982, he felt more like a horse than a jockey. Valdez tipped the scales at 153 pounds, 43 pounds more than he had weighed during those promising days when he was 17. A jockey who weighs 153 does not get much work. While at his heaviest, Valdez was an assistant starter with the gate crew at Los Alamitos. He kept telling people he would be back again as a jockey, and it came to be considered a joke. However, Valdez is getting the last laugh nowadays.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1989
With all the hand-wringing regarding Exxon and Valdez, hold on to these facts: Oil is biodegradable, and "this, too, shall pass!" LUCILLE GLASSMAN Westminster
SPORTS
February 25, 2006
Sending Bill Plaschke to Torino was like Exxon sending the Valdez to Alaska. JIM FREDRICK Manhattan Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1989
"The truth is the oil companies aren't prepared to handle a spill the size of Valdez or even one-tenth the size of Valdez." --Lt. Gov. Leo T. McCarthy, who serves on the State Lands Commission, addressing the issue of whether officials would be prepared for a major oil spill off the California coast should one occur.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2000
The "American Family" pilot is not the first on television about an East L.A. household ("Is It Prime Time for a New 'Family'?," by Dana Calvo, May 2). Way back in 1976 we did 15 episodes of a Latino family entitled "Viva Valdez" on ABC. Although the show was a comedy and not a drama, as the new one is, our Valdez family's Boyle Heights home consisted of a father, mother, three sons and a daughter living, learning and laughing about life's struggles, as I'm sure the current one will do. Unfortunately, one of the lessons the Valdez family learned was not to be on TV opposite "60 Minutes."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1987 | VICTOR VALLE, Times Staff Writer
Mix earthy renditions of Mexican ballads, computerized rock video imagery and the subtle narrative possibilities of ballet and you get a hybrid of Latino folk tradition and the performing arts that makes its public-broadcasting debut Wednesday. This unlikely marriage of aesthetics and technology is a key element of playwright-director-performer Luis Valdez's "Corridos: Tales of Passion and Revolution," produced by public television station KQED in San Francisco.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2014 | By Paresh Dave, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Ah, the open road: The lone highway into Valdez, Alaska, is finally clear, but residents say being cut off by land wasn't that big of a deal. Six miles of the Richardson Highway in and out of the town of 4,000 people were shut down for about 11 days because of multiple avalanches that dropped snow 50 feet high onto the lanes. Truck shipments and other travel were shifted to ships and airplanes. "Alaska is resilient," said Valdez resident Colleen Stephens. Although it reduced the town's independence, she said, "Did it really alter how we live our daily lives?
NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
With an estimated 50 feet of snow blocking the only highway into town, the 4,000 residents of Valdez, Alaska, will be cut off indefinitely, officials say, leaving access only by air or by sea. As many as a dozen avalanches came down on the 360-mile Richardson Highway to Fairbanks on Friday, officials said, including one that dammed a river and created a lake up to half a mile long across the road. The highway cannot be cleared until water behind the snow drains, state transportation officials say. “At this time, there is no safe way to approach relieving that water,” Jason Sakalaskas, a maintenance engineer, said at a news teleconference Monday, according to the Associated Press . The avalanches came in an area known locally as Snow Slide Path, said Mike Coffey, another maintenance engineer for the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities.
OPINION
October 27, 2013 | By Miriam Pawel
"Valley of the Heart" is a quintessentially California play, written by a master of the genre. It is a history lesson wrapped in a love story, with themes that could not be more contemporary: struggling immigrants, xenophobia and racism, cultural confusion and identity. Luis Valdez has drawn on his own childhood to craft what he calls a "memory play": A Mexican American sharecropper family takes over a ranch whose Japanese American owners are interned in 1942, just as Valdez's parents took over a Japanese grower's farm when he was 2 years old. The play showcases Valdez's gift for making people care about experiences far outside their own ambit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2013 | By Robert Crais
When Elmore Leonard died Tuesday -- at 87, still working on his 46th book -- we asked some of our favorite authors to share their thoughts about him. Robert Crais, the bestselling author of the 2012 thriller "Suspect" and the Elvis Cole crime series that began with "L.A. Requiem," has this remembrance. Most people knew him from "Get Shorty" or  "Justified," or "Be Cool" or "Bandits," and so this may surprise you, me being a crime writer and all, but my favorites are his westerns, "Valdez Is Coming" and "Hombre.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
In 1986, when Luis Valdez's play “I Don't Have to Show You No Stinking Badges” premiered in Los Angeles, its portrait of an upwardly mobile Latino family in Monterey Park shattered Hollywood stereotypes. Buddy Villa wasn't a bandito or a gardener, Connie Villa wasn't a madam or a maid - they just played them in the movies, earning enough as extras to send their daughter to medical school and their son, Sonny, the play's troubled, troubling protagonist, to Harvard. Casa 0101's affectionate revival, 25 years after the last L.A. production of “Badges,” is compelling not only historically, as a benchmark for how opportunities for Latinos on stage and screen have developed (not as much as one might have hoped)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2013 | By Corina Knoll and Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
A key prosecution witness in the Bell corruption case testified Wednesday that signatures on city contracts, minutes for council meetings, agendas and even resolutions were forged. Bell City Clerk Rebecca Valdez's testimony could bolster the defense's argument that record-keeping in Bell was so sloppy that it would be difficult to prove that six former council members inflated their annual salaries to nearly $100,000 by serving on boards and commissions that met for a few minutes, if ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1989
Thank God for Rep. Mel Levine ("Alaska Spill Energizes Vigilance in California," Op-Ed Page, May 8) and all your other writers, for keeping the horror and devastation of the Valdez oil spill alive and ticking before the public eye. Perhaps the public will eventually see what oil industry white lies and public apathy can do. It makes me disgusted and sad to see the animals, birds, and the marine life dying from the oil that was so carelessly spilled....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1989 | DONALD CHISHOLM and MARTIN LANDAU, Donald Chisholm is an assistant professor of political science at Ohio State University. Martin Landau is a professor of political science at UC Berkeley
That the catastrophe at Valdez would occur sooner or later, that the response of Exxon, of state and federal authorities to such a tragedy would be hopelessly inadequate, were virtually guaranteed. A captain who tested legally drunk, an unlicensed third mate at the helm and the absence of an effective procedure for coping with the spill were the immediate causes of the tragedy, yet explanations that go no further than specific circumstances miss the point. These were no more than consequences of decisions made earlier, no more than manifestations of an underlying problem that conditioned the accident, the very same that attended the destruction of Challenger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2013 | By Corina Knoll and Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
Bell was a place where the city clerk wasn't really the city clerk, where a councilman was all but banned from City Hall and where you didn't ask questions, a key witness in the Bell corruption case testified Tuesday. Rebecca Valdez said that when she began working for the city, she learned the key to survival: Do whatever City Manager Robert Rizzo asked. Valdez testified Tuesday that she was directed to sign unfamiliar documents, hand out incorrect salary information in response to a public records request from a resident and obtain signatures for doctored salary contracts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2013 | By Corina Knoll
More than two years after the Bell corruption case erupted, the prosecution called its first witness Friday in an effort to show that the leaders of the small, working-class city became some of the highest-paid city politicians in California by serving on boards that sometimes met just so they could approve further pay hikes. Rebecca Valdez, Bell's city clerk who has been granted immunity in exchange for her testimony, testified that it was her job to take notes at council meetings, including marking the start and end time of the various boards on which council members served, such as the Solid Waste and Recycling Authority.
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