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BUSINESS
March 20, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potentially cancer-causing air pollution in the town of Valdez, at the southern end of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, is as high as in many smoggy U.S. cities, a federally mandated watchdog group said Thursday. The pollution, particularly benzene, in the town of 4,000--"comparable" to levels in Los Angeles--poses a potential hazard to public health, according to a report prepared for the Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council.
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NEWS
December 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Columbia Glacier near Valdez is retreating so quickly that tour boats should be able to work their way up to its face within the next decade or so, a scientist says. The glacier is shrinking as much as 100 feet per day. "That's really ripping along," said Tad Pfeffer, a University of Colorado researcher. The Columbia Glacier is a massive river of ice flowing from the Chugach Mountains into a side channel of Prince William Sound. It has been rapidly sliding on its bed.
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NEWS
August 10, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
Four months after the nation's largest oil spill blackened Prince William Sound, Alaska has become a state that has lost its equilibrium. People who used to make money aren't. Those who used to be on the outs--itinerants and part-time workers--are making big bucks. Fishermen who operate from boats have all but been shut down, while those who string nets close to shore are making millions.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
North Slope Oil Production at 85% of Normal After Spill: Operations at Alaska's Prudhoe Bay field have been scaled back since Saturday as British Petroleum transferred the remaining oil from the East Lion, a tanker chartered by BP America Inc. that leaked 200 gallons of oil at the Port of Valdez. The port, the southern terminus of the Trans-Alaskan Pipeline, was closed Saturday, then partially reopened Monday.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dismissing allegations of misconduct against the oil-company consortium that operates the trans-Alaska pipeline, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Friday that empty oil tankers have not been illegally discharging toxic materials at a Valdez treatment facility. But in a formal response to charges by environmentalists and other critics, the EPA called for amending some procedures at the Alyeska Pipeline Service Co.'
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Columbia Glacier near Valdez is retreating so quickly that tour boats should be able to work their way up to its face within the next decade or so, a scientist says. The glacier is shrinking as much as 100 feet per day. "That's really ripping along," said Tad Pfeffer, a University of Colorado researcher. The Columbia Glacier is a massive river of ice flowing from the Chugach Mountains into a side channel of Prince William Sound. It has been rapidly sliding on its bed.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The argument over oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge begins with worries over its effects on Alaska's northern wilderness. But it shouldn't end there, environmentalists say. If Congress in the next few weeks gives its blessings to drilling, oil from the refuge will come under the control of the Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. once it leaves the oil field.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
For many of the Aleut villagers on this isolated island, fate has been cruelly instructive. On a March Good Friday 25 years ago their village on nearby Chenega Island was wiped off the map by a massive tidal wave. On Good Friday of this year, the Exxon Valdez ran aground 85 miles northeast of here and began bleeding millions of gallons of oil. Now, those villagers, relocated to this island, wait again for the worst that lies just offshore.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
North Slope Oil Production at 85% of Normal After Spill: Operations at Alaska's Prudhoe Bay field have been scaled back since Saturday as British Petroleum transferred the remaining oil from the East Lion, a tanker chartered by BP America Inc. that leaked 200 gallons of oil at the Port of Valdez. The port, the southern terminus of the Trans-Alaskan Pipeline, was closed Saturday, then partially reopened Monday.
TRAVEL
May 18, 2003 | Erik Olsen, Special to The Times
Valdez, Alaska So this is solitude. I am alone in a kayak on a vast glacier-cooled sea in south-central Alaska. A moment ago a bald eagle soared overhead, and the loudest sound around me was the whir of its wings slicing through the wind. To my right, a glacier curls off the face of a mountain, giving the fleeting impression that it is going to fall on me and crush my bones. Of course, it's just an illusion.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potentially cancer-causing air pollution in the town of Valdez, at the southern end of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, is as high as in many smoggy U.S. cities, a federally mandated watchdog group said Thursday. The pollution, particularly benzene, in the town of 4,000--"comparable" to levels in Los Angeles--poses a potential hazard to public health, according to a report prepared for the Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dismissing allegations of misconduct against the oil-company consortium that operates the trans-Alaska pipeline, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Friday that empty oil tankers have not been illegally discharging toxic materials at a Valdez treatment facility. But in a formal response to charges by environmentalists and other critics, the EPA called for amending some procedures at the Alyeska Pipeline Service Co.'
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The argument over oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge begins with worries over its effects on Alaska's northern wilderness. But it shouldn't end there, environmentalists say. If Congress in the next few weeks gives its blessings to drilling, oil from the refuge will come under the control of the Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. once it leaves the oil field.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
Four months after the nation's largest oil spill blackened Prince William Sound, Alaska has become a state that has lost its equilibrium. People who used to make money aren't. Those who used to be on the outs--itinerants and part-time workers--are making big bucks. Fishermen who operate from boats have all but been shut down, while those who string nets close to shore are making millions.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
For many of the Aleut villagers on this isolated island, fate has been cruelly instructive. On a March Good Friday 25 years ago their village on nearby Chenega Island was wiped off the map by a massive tidal wave. On Good Friday of this year, the Exxon Valdez ran aground 85 miles northeast of here and began bleeding millions of gallons of oil. Now, those villagers, relocated to this island, wait again for the worst that lies just offshore.
TRAVEL
March 12, 1995 | Jon K. Tillinghast, Tillinghast is a Juneau-based attorney and free-lance writer
Traveling in Alaska was once like running a trap line--out there were horizons both cruel and bountiful, with both the trapper's and the traveler's survival turning on knowing where to rest and on whom to rely. Sadly, few of Alaska's million summer tourists require that aptitude these days. Their bus driver will tell them all they need to know.
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