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Valedictorians

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years after fleeing El Salvador and entering the United States as an illegal immigrant, Miguel Perez won a piece of the American dream on Thursday. "I'm really happy this day has finally arrived," the 23-year-old said to a crowd of reporters gathered at the Federal Building in Los Angeles to record his new status as a legal resident. "I'm glad that I made it and I could keep my promise to my mother."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2001 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Late Thursday afternoon, 17-year-old Ana Olazava, first in her class at Compton's Dominguez High School, will stand on the weathered athletic field and deliver her valedictory speech. It will be short and pleasant, betraying none of her frustrations with high school. Parents will nod and teachers will smile. Hers is the irresistible story of the inner-city valedictorian, the immigrants' daughter whose success seems to redeem the promise of tough schools in tough places like Compton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1998
I cannot express my disappointment strongly enough that students from Vasquez High School were not included in your list of "best and brightest" high school graduates honored as valedictorians in the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys ("Valley Valedictorians," June 14). Vasquez High School is the smallest public high school in Los Angeles County. We are unique because of the size and location. Acton and Agua Dulce are rural communities. Our students travel long distances to attend Vasquez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1995 | PHUONG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jennifer Luu always thought it would be "pretty cool" to deliver a speech during high school graduation, but the 18-year-old honor student assumed it was a token of esteem reserved only for the class valedictorian. But she didn't know that Westminster High School and many other schools in Orange County had eliminated traditional addresses by valedictorians and replaced them with speeches that were chosen in student contests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1991 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stereotypes make Trabuco Hills High School senior Kelly Perez bristle. With blond hair and bright green eyes, Kelly says people consistently label her a "dumb blonde." Perez, 17, is anything but that. With a grade-point average 4.73, a letter in varsity soccer and a part-time job at an advertising agency, she doesn't have to prove that she's got an ample brain beneath her blond tresses. "It's nice to surprise people who judge others by stereotypes," Perez said. "I work hard in everything I do.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1995 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She's preparing to be a lawyer and her grades have landed her on the dean's list at Cal State Fullerton. She works 20 hours a week and spends time volunteering with youths near her South-Central Los Angeles home. And while she studies for the six courses she is taking, she watches her 2-year-old son, Arthur, whom she supports only with the help of her mother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1994 | MARK SABBATINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was the speech no one was supposed to hear. Now millions have. Brad Bjelke, 18, graduated at the top of his Saugus High School class with a grade-point average of 4.44 (he got extra points for taking honors classes). But Brad never got to deliver a valedictorian speech. School officials eliminated the honor this school year because, according to the principal, "it was a tradition that we didn't think had enough positives." Not enough positives? Achieving the top grades in your class?
NEWS
July 11, 1993
This school year, City Times has honored the Central City's best on the football field, basketball court and baseball diamond. This is the second part of City Times' tribute to the area's high school valedictorians. The outstading students were asked: "What kind of future does Los Angeles hold for you and your classmates?" Bell High Sonia Velazquez Bell Future: Princeton "The situation in Los Angeles is pretty grim.
NEWS
June 18, 1991 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harvard, Princeton, Dartmouth and Brown wanted Joe Huynh in their freshman class. So did Georgetown, Duke, Northwestern, Stanford, UC Berkeley and UCLA. All in all, a pretty good year for Huynh, who was accepted at to 13 of the nation's top universities and was captain of the tennis team, dated the prom queen, earned an A-plus average and will be valedictorian at his graduation from Hoover High School in Glendale on Thursday.
NEWS
November 7, 1988
Apparently it's not enough for Bush to smear the American Civil Liberties Union and the "L" word. He has tried to smear the peace forces in this country by lying about our position on the testing of nuclear weapons. Since 1982, the Nuclear Weapons Freeze Campaign has consistently advocated a bilateral freeze on the testing of nuclear weapons. Bilateral means both sides! The freeze movement has never called for a unilateral freeze or unilateral cuts in our weapons!
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