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Valentina Egorova

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SPORTS
April 17, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valentina Egorova's arduous summer began well before the Olympic Games in July, before she ran through heat and humidity and raced up a mountain to win a gold medal. It began in March, when the Russian marathoner was selected to represent the Commonwealth of Independent States after finishing fourth in the 1992 Los Angeles Marathon.
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SPORTS
April 17, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valentina Egorova's arduous summer began well before the Olympic Games in July, before she ran through heat and humidity and raced up a mountain to win a gold medal. It began in March, when the Russian marathoner was selected to represent the Commonwealth of Independent States after finishing fourth in the 1992 Los Angeles Marathon.
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SPORTS
April 19, 1993 | JULIE CART
A 97-year-old tradition continues today, as the Boston Marathon is run over roads spotted with potholes caused by winter storms. This annual 26.2-mile race from suburban Hopkinton, over undulating hills, to finish in the gritty streets of downtown Boston is that event that welcomes spring to this region.
SPORTS
April 18, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ibrahim Hussein of Kenya, a three-time winner of the Boston Marathon, remarked as he reviewed entries for Monday's race: "What other race in the world, including the Olympics, can you run against eight other Kenyans?" Where indeed? Boston's challenging and storied course annually attracts the best in the world, and in the men's marathon that inevitably means Africans.
SPORTS
April 20, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cosmas N'Deti of Kenya gave his 4-day-old son a legacy Monday. The new father said he approached the running of the Boston Marathon as a warrior would defend his family. "When you are going to war, you must have a gun and bullets," N'Deti said. "For me, this was like going to war. I must defend my family. When he grows, I will tell my son what I did and that he must also defend his family." As a warrior, N'Deti makes a great marathoner.
SPORTS
March 6, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When last John Treacy ran through the streets of Los Angeles, he was happily re-establishing himself in an event he had taken up, with instant success, in 1984. The first time here for the Irishman was the L.A. Olympics, where Treacy ran his first marathon and won a silver medal, to the astonishment of Olympic observers. But Treacy entered the 1992 Los Angeles Marathon after having gone years without a satisfying result.
SPORTS
April 18, 1993 | BERT ROSENTHAL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Here come the South Africans. And here come the Koreans--again. The Boston Marathon, a melting pot for distance runners, is welcoming the formerly exiled South Africans for the first time in the race's 97-year history and bringing back the Koreans for the first time in 43 years Monday. "I've always wanted to run Boston," said David Tsebe, a 26-year-old South African who ran the fastest time in the world last year, 2 hours 8 minutes 7 seconds, in winning the Berlin Marathon.
SPORTS
March 2, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the first Sunday of March every year, the streets around the Coliseum echo with the strains of the signature song of the L.A. Marathon--Randy Newman's, "I Love L.A." Played in a continuous blare at the start, the song remained for most of the 20,000 runners more a suggestion than declaration. For John Treacy of Ireland and Madina Biktagirova of Belarus--the male and female winners of Sunday's seventh race--the song became an ode to their new favorite town.
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