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Valeria Golino

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MAGAZINE
January 8, 1989 | Mary Rourke, Mary Rourke is a Times staff writer
In a semitropical climate, where January sometimes feels like July, the season's best color is winter white. In snow country, it takes the form of heavy woolens in shades of ivory and ecru. But in Southern California, the term gets translated more liberally. Even pure-white linen looks right on warm winter days. And then there is the international travelers' choice: off-white in year-round fabrics for Los Angeles and cities that share its latitude.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
"ACTING is a rejection game," Valeria Golino says flatly. "The people who hire you can reject you. But sometimes you can reject them too." The business of choosing, getting passed over for and turning down film roles currently weighs heavy on her mind. For two decades, Golino, 36, has enjoyed a career of unusual variety, alternating in the past 15 years between Hollywood movies and films in her native Italy. An indication of the eccentric turns her career has taken? She made her U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1988
So film exhibitors think Pee-wee's 3-minute kiss is "unfunny" (Outtakes, by Craig Modderno, June 19)? Remarkable. I find the mere idea of it very funny indeed! Let's hope Valeria Golino is rewarded with the Oscar nomination she deserves. KATHY T. DALLAS Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
January 8, 1989 | Mary Rourke, Mary Rourke is a Times staff writer
In a semitropical climate, where January sometimes feels like July, the season's best color is winter white. In snow country, it takes the form of heavy woolens in shades of ivory and ecru. But in Southern California, the term gets translated more liberally. Even pure-white linen looks right on warm winter days. And then there is the international travelers' choice: off-white in year-round fabrics for Los Angeles and cities that share its latitude.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
If all else fails, Valeria Golino will be remembered as the adorable Italian actress who dared to kiss Pee-wee Herman on screen for 3 minutes and 16 seconds without coming up for air. "This kiss, unbelievable," Golino said, in her husky, sexy accented English. "To me, it is one of my favorite scenes because it goes on so long that it will for sure get a reaction out of the public."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
"ACTING is a rejection game," Valeria Golino says flatly. "The people who hire you can reject you. But sometimes you can reject them too." The business of choosing, getting passed over for and turning down film roles currently weighs heavy on her mind. For two decades, Golino, 36, has enjoyed a career of unusual variety, alternating in the past 15 years between Hollywood movies and films in her native Italy. An indication of the eccentric turns her career has taken? She made her U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Full Slate: The slate of actors who will star with Dana Carvey in "Clean Slate," the upcoming film from Academy Award-winning producers Richard D. Zanuck and Lili Fini Zanuck for MGM, is no longer clean. Valeria Golino, best known for her role in "Rain Man," veteran actor James Earl Jones, and Kevin Pollak, known for his role in "A Few Good Men," have been cast in the movie about a private eye with amnesia. Production begins this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1988 | Craig Modderno
The longest screen kiss in movie history: Valentino? John Gilbert? Kevin Costner? Try Pee-wee Herman. Unless there's some last minute editing, you'll see it when Paramount releases "Big Top Pee-wee" July 22. In the current cut, Pee-wee smooches with Italian actress Valeria Golino, who plays a trapeze artist, for three minutes-- with the camera zooming in and out to make the most of it. Some film exhibitors who have seen the comedy told us they found it unfunny.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1986 | Associated Press
"Summer," a film by French director Eric Rohmer about a young woman's isolation, Wednesday won the Golden Lion prize at the film festival here. "Summer" (a review of the film is on Page 2) also won a separate award from the International Catholic Film Organization. An Italian and a Soviet entry tied for second place.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Emanuele Crialese's "Respiro" (I Breathe) is beautifully directed, but that doesn't keep it from seeming faintly silly. Inspired by a legend on the island of Lampedusa off the west coast of Sicily, where the film was shot, it stars Valeria Golino as the seductive wife of a virile, devoted fisherman, Pietro (Vincenzo Amato), and the mother of their three children. Golino's Grazia is a determined free spirit who feels a strong communion with the deep blue sea that surrounds her.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
If all else fails, Valeria Golino will be remembered as the adorable Italian actress who dared to kiss Pee-wee Herman on screen for 3 minutes and 16 seconds without coming up for air. "This kiss, unbelievable," Golino said, in her husky, sexy accented English. "To me, it is one of my favorite scenes because it goes on so long that it will for sure get a reaction out of the public."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1988
So film exhibitors think Pee-wee's 3-minute kiss is "unfunny" (Outtakes, by Craig Modderno, June 19)? Remarkable. I find the mere idea of it very funny indeed! Let's hope Valeria Golino is rewarded with the Oscar nomination she deserves. KATHY T. DALLAS Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Whether she's trysting with her married lover or helping other people die, the title character of "Honey" is a fascinating and complex figure, and Jasmine Trinca inhabits the role with a detached intensity that's thoroughly compelling. The Italian film - the assured feature-directing debut by actress Valeria Golino, still best known to American audiences for "Rain Man" - achieves the rare feat of addressing euthanasia head-on without devolving into a dramatized treatise or a button-pushing issue movie.
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