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BUSINESS
August 5, 2002 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Albert Wheelon, former Los Angeles aerospace executive and onetime CIA technology chief, has written a tell-all book, but not the sort likely to create much controversy. In a research effort that spanned more than a decade, Wheelon has published the first of at least two technical volumes on electromagnetic scintillation, the phenomenon that causes stars to twinkle. Not exactly light summertime reading, Wheelon's 455-page book is filled with mathematical equations and charts.
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HEALTH
January 6, 2003 | Amanda Ursell, Special to The Times
"Giving up smoking is easy," claimed Mark Twain. "I've done it a thousand times." Fortunately, the average smoker is able to quit smoking after three or four attempts -- and many will begin their efforts in the new year. Although nicotine patches, hypnotism and acupuncture may increase a smoker's odds of successfully quitting the habit, what you eat -- and when -- can help ameliorate symptoms of nicotine withdrawal, including irritability, depression, insomnia and weight gain.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
Steven Wynbrandt sticks his hand deep beneath the layers of straw that blanket his enormous compost heap and pulls out a fistful of black gold, sweet and earthy. “Look at this soil,” Wynbrandt says with excitement as his fingers open, revealing his secret recipe for compost: decomposed dairy cow manure, alfalfa, yarrow, camomile, stinging nettle, oak bark, dandelion and valerian flowers. “I'm an alchemist.” PHOTOS: The Wynbrandt backyard As further proof that compost is to gardening these days what grass-fed beef and gluten-free gourmet foods are to the world of food, the Wynbrandt compost heap photographed by the Los Angeles Times would later sell through word of mouth for $1 a pound.
OPINION
July 7, 2013 | Paul A. Offit, Paul A. Offit, a physician, is chief of the division of infectious diseases at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, a professor of pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of "Do You Believe in Magic?: The Sense and Nonsense of Alternative Medicine."
In an early comedy routine, George Carlin compared football and baseball: "Baseball is a 19th century pastoral game," he said. "Football is a 20th century technological struggle.... Football has hitting ... and unnecessary roughness and personal fouls. Baseball has the sacrifice. " In football, the quarterback riddles the defense with the shotgun; "in baseball, the object is to go home! And to be safe!" Some might say the same can be said for conventional and alternative remedies.
HEALTH
April 2, 2001 | Barrie R. Cassileth
Got a headache? There are pills for it. Too much stress and anxiety? Numerous pills and capsules for those problems, too. Sex life not up to par? A pill can take care of it. High blood pressure? Good medication for that as well. Pharmaceutical companies have done a fantastic job of making our lives healthier and more comfortable. Why, then, is the natural and herbal remedies business going so strong? More than 1,000 Web sites are dedicated to herbs.
HEALTH
September 25, 2006 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
Whether meditating before bed or sipping a kava kava nightcap, more than 1.6 million Americans use some form of alternative medicine when they have trouble sleeping. In analyzing data from 31,000 Americans interviewed for the 2002 National Health Interview Survey, researchers found that nearly one-fifth of adults reported difficulty sleeping in the last 12 months, and of those, about 5% used complementary and alternative medicine to treat their sleeplessness.
HOME & GARDEN
April 14, 2001 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Does garlic cure infections? Will lavender oil bring on sleep? Can fennel help digestion? There may be skeptics, but Carole Ottesen isn't one. She's confident in the medicinal properties of some herbs, vegetables and plants, and has written a book, "The Herbal Epicure: Growing, Harvesting and Cooking Healing Herbs" ($16, Ballantine/Wellspring, 2001), that tells how to make the most of them. "I'm not saying all herbs are good," she said by phone from her home near Washington, D.C.
HEALTH
June 18, 2001 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Many women rely on black cohash, wild yam and the Chinese herb Dong Quai as alternative therapies to ease the symptoms of menopause, but a leading medical organization says there is little scientific evidence that these and other natural therapies actually work. As many as 30% of women turn to acupuncture or natural products for relief of menopausal symptoms, according to the North American Menopause Society.
HOME & GARDEN
March 9, 1996 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twenty years ago, Hortense Miller bought a gallon can of goldenrod at the nursery, planted it in her sprawling Laguna Beach garden and let it roam. Today the plant's striking yellow plumes appear all over her hillside garden. Every November, lavender asters dot her landscape, thanks to a handful of roots she planted more than 10 years ago. For Miller, who orchestrated what is considered one of the best private gardens in America, plants such as goldenrod and aster are a necessity.
NEWS
July 4, 1986 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
The 39th round of the 13-year-old East-West talks on conventional force reductions in Central Europe ended here Thursday, with senior NATO ambassadors saying they are convinced that the Soviet Union no longer wants to negotiate any agreement and instead is maneuvering to have the talks killed off entirely.
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