Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsValerian
IN THE NEWS

Valerian

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
HEALTH
January 6, 2003 | Amanda Ursell, Special to The Times
"Giving up smoking is easy," claimed Mark Twain. "I've done it a thousand times." Fortunately, the average smoker is able to quit smoking after three or four attempts -- and many will begin their efforts in the new year. Although nicotine patches, hypnotism and acupuncture may increase a smoker's odds of successfully quitting the habit, what you eat -- and when -- can help ameliorate symptoms of nicotine withdrawal, including irritability, depression, insomnia and weight gain.
Advertisement
HEALTH
November 30, 1998 | From WASHINGTON POST
Herbal medicines are increasingly popular, but many patients do not inform their physicians that they are using these alternative remedies, according to one of the studies released earlier this month by the American Medical Assn. This can be dangerous because some of the herbs affect prescription drugs that patients may also use. * Chamomile: Contains coumarin, but chamomile's effects on the body's anticoagulation system have not been studied.
OPINION
July 7, 2013 | Paul A. Offit, Paul A. Offit, a physician, is chief of the division of infectious diseases at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, a professor of pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of "Do You Believe in Magic?: The Sense and Nonsense of Alternative Medicine."
In an early comedy routine, George Carlin compared football and baseball: "Baseball is a 19th century pastoral game," he said. "Football is a 20th century technological struggle.... Football has hitting ... and unnecessary roughness and personal fouls. Baseball has the sacrifice. " In football, the quarterback riddles the defense with the shotgun; "in baseball, the object is to go home! And to be safe!" Some might say the same can be said for conventional and alternative remedies.
HOME & GARDEN
April 14, 2001 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Does garlic cure infections? Will lavender oil bring on sleep? Can fennel help digestion? There may be skeptics, but Carole Ottesen isn't one. She's confident in the medicinal properties of some herbs, vegetables and plants, and has written a book, "The Herbal Epicure: Growing, Harvesting and Cooking Healing Herbs" ($16, Ballantine/Wellspring, 2001), that tells how to make the most of them. "I'm not saying all herbs are good," she said by phone from her home near Washington, D.C.
HEALTH
April 2, 2001 | Barrie R. Cassileth
Got a headache? There are pills for it. Too much stress and anxiety? Numerous pills and capsules for those problems, too. Sex life not up to par? A pill can take care of it. High blood pressure? Good medication for that as well. Pharmaceutical companies have done a fantastic job of making our lives healthier and more comfortable. Why, then, is the natural and herbal remedies business going so strong? More than 1,000 Web sites are dedicated to herbs.
HEALTH
September 25, 2006 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
Whether meditating before bed or sipping a kava kava nightcap, more than 1.6 million Americans use some form of alternative medicine when they have trouble sleeping. In analyzing data from 31,000 Americans interviewed for the 2002 National Health Interview Survey, researchers found that nearly one-fifth of adults reported difficulty sleeping in the last 12 months, and of those, about 5% used complementary and alternative medicine to treat their sleeplessness.
NEWS
May 1, 2003 | Daniel Cariaga, Times Staff Writer
"Il Trovatore," often maligned, spoofed and denigrated, nonetheless remains a trove of musical riches high in the Verdi canon, and a gem of the composer's cherishable middle period. The reasons are obvious: its relentless melodiousness, its dramatic pungency, its wealth of great vocal ensembles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
John NICHOLS can't stop writing. He often produces 10, 20, 30 drafts of a book, some more than 1,000 pages long. Nichols saves them all and frequently returns to things he started decades ago. Threads of stories surround the writer like milkweed seeds with their gauzy fibers. His little adobe house in Taos is full of books and other projects. Overflow goes to one of several storage lockers.
HEALTH
July 3, 2000 | From Washington Post
In the beginning, Debra Jones was simply trying to do a favor for a friend, but today she is a leader in the cause of finding natural remedies for the childhood maladies known as attention deficit disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It is a fertile and growing field. Her organization, Parents Against Ritalin, is a rallying point for opposition to the leading prescription treatment for ADD and ADHD, and interest is "like never before," she said.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | DICK LOCHTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By titling her new mystery "The Revenge of Kali-Ra" (Mysterious Press, $22, 229 pages) and dedicating it "affectionately and respectfully" to the memory of Sax Rohmer and H. Rider Haggard (among others), the witty novelist K.K. Beck sets us up for a playful spoof of those writers of the purple page. She delivers that in spades, along with a gleeful evisceration of today's Hollywood, where youth must be served . . . and served . . .
Los Angeles Times Articles
|