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HEALTH
April 2, 2001 | Barrie R. Cassileth
Got a headache? There are pills for it. Too much stress and anxiety? Numerous pills and capsules for those problems, too. Sex life not up to par? A pill can take care of it. High blood pressure? Good medication for that as well. Pharmaceutical companies have done a fantastic job of making our lives healthier and more comfortable. Why, then, is the natural and herbal remedies business going so strong? More than 1,000 Web sites are dedicated to herbs.
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HOME & GARDEN
April 14, 2001 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Does garlic cure infections? Will lavender oil bring on sleep? Can fennel help digestion? There may be skeptics, but Carole Ottesen isn't one. She's confident in the medicinal properties of some herbs, vegetables and plants, and has written a book, "The Herbal Epicure: Growing, Harvesting and Cooking Healing Herbs" ($16, Ballantine/Wellspring, 2001), that tells how to make the most of them. "I'm not saying all herbs are good," she said by phone from her home near Washington, D.C.
HEALTH
September 25, 2006 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
Whether meditating before bed or sipping a kava kava nightcap, more than 1.6 million Americans use some form of alternative medicine when they have trouble sleeping. In analyzing data from 31,000 Americans interviewed for the 2002 National Health Interview Survey, researchers found that nearly one-fifth of adults reported difficulty sleeping in the last 12 months, and of those, about 5% used complementary and alternative medicine to treat their sleeplessness.
REAL ESTATE
May 18, 1997 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
As trees mature and houses top two stories, gardens are becoming increasingly dark in many Southern California neighborhoods. Shadows creep across the landscape, and there is less and less of that precious full sun that plants are so fond of. Nurseries see this trend, which is why more and more plant labels say "sun/part shade"--suggesting that the plant can grow in either situation--though in many cases it's simply not true. Most plants want a full day of sun, from sunup to sundown.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | Times researcher Cindy Sharf and Staff Writer Carey Goldberg
Just about everything seems to be changing in the Soviet Union, including names. The sprawling state occupying one-sixth of the world's landmass is still technically called the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, but even that will change when a new federal treaty is signed. President Mikhail S.
NEWS
July 4, 1986 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
The 39th round of the 13-year-old East-West talks on conventional force reductions in Central Europe ended here Thursday, with senior NATO ambassadors saying they are convinced that the Soviet Union no longer wants to negotiate any agreement and instead is maneuvering to have the talks killed off entirely.
NEWS
January 30, 1987 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
A 15th and probably final year of the East-West negotiations on mutual and balanced force reductions in Central Europe opened Thursday with both sides marking time and calling on the other to take a first step. But the delegations from seven Warsaw Pact countries and 12 countries of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization will probably not have to go on making the same speeches for much longer.
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
Delegates from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization powers and the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact on Thursday began their 14th year of negotiations on military force reductions in Central Europe, and for the first time in this long stalemate, both sides are now talking cautiously about possible agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Environmentally friendly agriculture--in particular, a ritualized version of organic farming invented 70 years ago by an Austrian homeopath--could mitigate the damage of chemical-dependent conventional agriculture without cutting into farm profitability, a study has found.
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