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Valerie Eliot

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November 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Nobel Prize-winning poet T.S. Eliot died in England in 1965; his widow Valerie made it her mission to keep his work alive. She died  in 2012 at the age of 86, and her estimable estate goes up for auction in London on Wednesday. Christie's is calling the auction " A Life's Devotion: The Collection of the Late Mrs T.S. Eliot . " Thirty-eight years his junior, Valerie, Eliot's second wife, carefully guarded his legacy. Literary watchers were surprised when she allowed the poems in Eliot's "Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats" to be made into a musical.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By David Ng
T.S. Eliot never lived to see the Andrew Lloyd Webber stage musical "Cats," based on Eliot's collection of poems "Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats. " But Eliot's second wife and widow, Valerie, did live long enough to profit from the musical, amassing a sizable fortune from the royalties, which she used at least in part to buy art. On Wednesday, Valerie Eliot's art collection was auctioned off for approximately $12.9 million, including buyers' premium, at a Christie's auction in London.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By David Ng
T.S. Eliot never lived to see the Andrew Lloyd Webber stage musical "Cats," based on Eliot's collection of poems "Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats. " But Eliot's second wife and widow, Valerie, did live long enough to profit from the musical, amassing a sizable fortune from the royalties, which she used at least in part to buy art. On Wednesday, Valerie Eliot's art collection was auctioned off for approximately $12.9 million, including buyers' premium, at a Christie's auction in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Nobel Prize-winning poet T.S. Eliot died in England in 1965; his widow Valerie made it her mission to keep his work alive. She died  in 2012 at the age of 86, and her estimable estate goes up for auction in London on Wednesday. Christie's is calling the auction " A Life's Devotion: The Collection of the Late Mrs T.S. Eliot . " Thirty-eight years his junior, Valerie, Eliot's second wife, carefully guarded his legacy. Literary watchers were surprised when she allowed the poems in Eliot's "Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats" to be made into a musical.
BOOKS
April 20, 1997 | WILLIAM PFAFF, William Pfaff is the author of "The Wrath of Nations," "Barbarian Sentiments" and other books. He is a 1949 graduate of the University of Notre Dame
T.S. Eliot seemed to us as inevitable as Shakespeare. The first words of his we read were the first he published as a mature poet, beginning with that magisterial and irresistible invitation, "Let us go then, you and I / When the evening is spread out against the sky. . . ." Entranced, we followed, as we followed no other poet and as most of us were never to follow one again. Why? It was the meter, the diction, the address.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | KATHERINE STEPHEN, Stephen is a London writer
In a large, overheated room within the imposing structure of Lloyd's Bank in the heart of London's financial district, about 100 people gathered to honor a former bank employee. A hush came over the crowd as Sir Jeremy Morse, host of the gathering, delivered a speech in tribute to this staff member--a model worker--who started out interpreting the balance sheets of foreign banks and graduated to the information department of Lloyd's head office. In his spare time, this employee wrote poetry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2012
Thomas Cassidy Longtime classical music radio announcer in L.A. Thomas Cassidy, 95, an announcer who was the longtime host of classical music programs on the now-defunct KFAC radio station, died Nov. 5 at Northridge Hospital Medical Center, his daughter Peggy Friedman said. The cause was not given. From December 1943 until January 1987, Cassidy was the host of KFAC's "Evening Concert" series. He also hosted the station's "Musical Masterpieces" and "Luncheon at the Music Center" shows for many years.
BOOKS
September 25, 1988
My dear Pound, I have been reading some of your work lately. I enjoyed the article on the Vortex (please tell me who Kandinsky is). I distrust and detest Aesthetics, when it cuts loose from the Object, and vapours in the void, but you have not done that. The closer one keeps to the Artist's discussion of his technique the better, I think, and the only kind of art worth talking about is the art one happens to like.
BOOKS
January 7, 1996 | Noel Riley Fitch, Noel Riley Fitch, whose most recent biography is "Anais: the Erotic Life of Anais Nin" (Little, Brown), is at work on a biography of Julia Child
Virgil Thomson had already told me to ignore her. "She's a drunk!" he said dismissively. I did not know then that she had been sober for more than a decade. But a biographer leaves no door unopened, even one belonging to a fanatic for privacy. I had written to Djuna Barnes for assistance in researching a book on her friend Sylvia Beach's Shakespeare & Company bookshop. In reply, Barnes sent me a much-duplicated page that announced "Djuna Barnes does not . . . "--and there followed a list of 20-some services well beyond my modest request for a memory or two. This Greta Garbo of American letters, who died in Greenwich Village in 1982, had long ago closed the doors on the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2012
Thomas Cassidy Longtime classical music radio announcer in L.A. Thomas Cassidy, 95, an announcer who was the longtime host of classical music programs on the now-defunct KFAC radio station, died Nov. 5 at Northridge Hospital Medical Center, his daughter Peggy Friedman said. The cause was not given. From December 1943 until January 1987, Cassidy was the host of KFAC's "Evening Concert" series. He also hosted the station's "Musical Masterpieces" and "Luncheon at the Music Center" shows for many years.
BOOKS
April 20, 1997 | WILLIAM PFAFF, William Pfaff is the author of "The Wrath of Nations," "Barbarian Sentiments" and other books. He is a 1949 graduate of the University of Notre Dame
T.S. Eliot seemed to us as inevitable as Shakespeare. The first words of his we read were the first he published as a mature poet, beginning with that magisterial and irresistible invitation, "Let us go then, you and I / When the evening is spread out against the sky. . . ." Entranced, we followed, as we followed no other poet and as most of us were never to follow one again. Why? It was the meter, the diction, the address.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | KATHERINE STEPHEN, Stephen is a London writer
In a large, overheated room within the imposing structure of Lloyd's Bank in the heart of London's financial district, about 100 people gathered to honor a former bank employee. A hush came over the crowd as Sir Jeremy Morse, host of the gathering, delivered a speech in tribute to this staff member--a model worker--who started out interpreting the balance sheets of foreign banks and graduated to the information department of Lloyd's head office. In his spare time, this employee wrote poetry.
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