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Valerie Jarrett

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November 15, 2008 | Christi Parsons, Parsons writes for the Chicago Tribune.
Valerie Jarrett, a prominent Chicago business and political figure and an influential member of President-elect Barack Obama's inner circle, is poised to play a crucial role in the White House as a public liaison and senior aide to the president. In an official announcement due today, Jarrett will be named senior advisor and assistant to the president in charge of intergovernmental relations.
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NATIONAL
February 7, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- First lady Michelle Obama plans to attend the funeral Saturday in Chicago of 15-year-old Hadiya Pendleton, according to a White House official who asked not to be named. Pendleton, an honor student and band majorette at King College Prep, was fatally shot last week about a mile from the Obamas' home in Chicago's Kenwood neighborhood. She had participated in inaugural festivities near Washington only a few days before her death. The White House official said Thursday that senior advisor Valerie Jarrett and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan will also attend the funeral.
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NATIONAL
February 19, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
It was all in a recent day's work for Valerie Jarrett. She reassured Jewish leaders about White House strategy on Egypt, helped the first lady sync her spring agenda with her husband's, ushered a former Fed chairman into the Oval Office, soothed the Rev. Al Sharpton's concerns about education policy and took a stroll with President Obama across Lafayette Park to patch things up with some irritated CEOs. The schedule illustrates that no one else in the White House now has a range of responsibilities equal to Jarrett's.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2013 | By David Lauter, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - In President Obama's first term, a promise of bipartisanship withered on stony ground; as his second begins, he has openly embraced confrontation. On a parade of hot-button political issues, including the budget, gun control and immigration, Obama has begun to hammer on weak points in the Republican coalition. He has made little effort to woo members of the opposition in Congress, whose positions he has characterized publicly as "intransigent," "extreme" and "absurd.
NATIONAL
December 28, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
The state House committee investigating a possible impeachment of Democratic Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich won't subpoena two incoming White House advisors, the committee chairwoman said. In a letter received by the committee Friday, U.S. Atty. Patrick J. Fitzgerald asked the special investigative committee specifically not to subpoena President-elect Barack Obama advisor Valerie Jarrett, incoming Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. (D-Ill.) or Nils Larsen, a Tribune Co. executive vice president.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- First lady Michelle Obama plans to attend the funeral Saturday in Chicago of 15-year-old Hadiya Pendleton, according to a White House official who asked not to be named. Pendleton, an honor student and band majorette at King College Prep, was fatally shot last week about a mile from the Obamas' home in Chicago's Kenwood neighborhood. She had participated in inaugural festivities near Washington only a few days before her death. The White House official said Thursday that senior advisor Valerie Jarrett and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan will also attend the funeral.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
In the West Wing it had become a pretty common sight: two national security aides with close ties to the president, Thomas Donilon and Denis McDonough, hurrying into the Oval Office to show him the latest piece of hot intelligence. Some administration officials who watched the scene unfold worried that James L. Jones, the national security advisor at the time, was being left out of the loop and that Obama was being given raw reports before their meaning and import were clear. A strong national security advisor might weed out what the president doesn't need to see. Yet Obama never quite clicked with Jones ?
NATIONAL
January 9, 2013 | By Christi Parsons and Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Wednesday's "photo of the day" on the White House website showed an unusual sight in Oval Office history - the president surrounded by top advisors, only half of whom are white men. The picture seemed calculated to counter criticism that President Obama's new set of Cabinet appointees so far all are white and male. Obama is expected to name his chief of staff, Jacob Lew, to lead the Treasury Department. Further compounding the diversity problem, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton plans to leave the administration soon, and Labor Secretary Hilda L. Solis announced Wednesday that she was resigning.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
Three days after the midterm elections, senior Obama aides suggested to a gathering of liberal groups at the White House that they might need to scale back their expectations. In the wake of the big Republican win, there would be no new major legislative pushes from President Obama in 2011. The mood, according to some participants at the meeting, was dour. Although the White House advisors said job creation would be a central goal, they did not lay out a concrete plan for putting more people to work.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2010 | Peter Nicholas and Lisa Mascaro
Many of the unpleasant little tasks that a White House confronts ? nudging an aide out the door, perhaps, or helping a senator find someone a job ? tend to wind up on Pete Rouse's desk. Rouse, 64, a low-key troubleshooter and consummate backroom player whose work is seldom publicized, is being elevated to a post in which he may lose some of his cherished anonymity: White House chief of staff. Rouse will succeed Rahm Emanuel, who is leaving to run for mayor of Chicago. It's an interim appointment, although White House aides say Rouse could end up getting the post on a permanent basis.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2013 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Over the years, when asked whether he had done enough to build relationships with his Republican adversaries, President Obama typically replied with stock answers and dry political analysis. But on Monday, in his final news conference of his first term, a different Obama came up with a different answer. In 700 off-the-cuff words, he showed a little snarky defensiveness about his social aptitude. Yes, he said, he socializes. Of course, he continued, he "likes a good party.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2013 | By Christi Parsons and Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Wednesday's "photo of the day" on the White House website showed an unusual sight in Oval Office history - the president surrounded by top advisors, only half of whom are white men. The picture seemed calculated to counter criticism that President Obama's new set of Cabinet appointees so far all are white and male. Obama is expected to name his chief of staff, Jacob Lew, to lead the Treasury Department. Further compounding the diversity problem, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton plans to leave the administration soon, and Labor Secretary Hilda L. Solis announced Wednesday that she was resigning.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
It was all in a recent day's work for Valerie Jarrett. She reassured Jewish leaders about White House strategy on Egypt, helped the first lady sync her spring agenda with her husband's, ushered a former Fed chairman into the Oval Office, soothed the Rev. Al Sharpton's concerns about education policy and took a stroll with President Obama across Lafayette Park to patch things up with some irritated CEOs. The schedule illustrates that no one else in the White House now has a range of responsibilities equal to Jarrett's.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
A major shakeup in President Obama's Cabinet won't happen in the new year, as the White House settles in for a reelection campaign and a political realignment in which Republicans control the House of Representatives, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said Sunday. After a tenure marked by sluggish economic growth and historic legislative victories, Obama is under pressure from voices within the Democratic Party to upend his team for the second half of the term. Prominent Democrats have called on Obama to broaden his inner circle and bring in people better positioned to negotiate on equal terms with emboldened House and Senate Republicans.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
In the West Wing it had become a pretty common sight: two national security aides with close ties to the president, Thomas Donilon and Denis McDonough, hurrying into the Oval Office to show him the latest piece of hot intelligence. Some administration officials who watched the scene unfold worried that James L. Jones, the national security advisor at the time, was being left out of the loop and that Obama was being given raw reports before their meaning and import were clear. A strong national security advisor might weed out what the president doesn't need to see. Yet Obama never quite clicked with Jones ?
NATIONAL
November 12, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
Three days after the midterm elections, senior Obama aides suggested to a gathering of liberal groups at the White House that they might need to scale back their expectations. In the wake of the big Republican win, there would be no new major legislative pushes from President Obama in 2011. The mood, according to some participants at the meeting, was dour. Although the White House advisors said job creation would be a central goal, they did not lay out a concrete plan for putting more people to work.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera
The move this week to downgrade a proposed Consumer Financial Protection Agency to lure bipartisan support instead appears to be undermining the Obama administration's effort to overhaul the nation's regulation of the entire industry. The overhaul, aimed at preventing a repeat of the economic meltdown that helped send the nation and world markets into a deep recession, now might be moving closer to the junk heap of congressional bills than to a significant new law. Creating a powerful and independent consumer agency, which is strongly opposed by the financial industry and Republicans, has been the major roadblock in drafting a bill that could pass in the Senate.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
A major shakeup in President Obama's Cabinet won't happen in the new year, as the White House settles in for a reelection campaign and a political realignment in which Republicans control the House of Representatives, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said Sunday. After a tenure marked by sluggish economic growth and historic legislative victories, Obama is under pressure from voices within the Democratic Party to upend his team for the second half of the term. Prominent Democrats have called on Obama to broaden his inner circle and bring in people better positioned to negotiate on equal terms with emboldened House and Senate Republicans.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2010 | Peter Nicholas and Lisa Mascaro
Many of the unpleasant little tasks that a White House confronts ? nudging an aide out the door, perhaps, or helping a senator find someone a job ? tend to wind up on Pete Rouse's desk. Rouse, 64, a low-key troubleshooter and consummate backroom player whose work is seldom publicized, is being elevated to a post in which he may lose some of his cherished anonymity: White House chief of staff. Rouse will succeed Rahm Emanuel, who is leaving to run for mayor of Chicago. It's an interim appointment, although White House aides say Rouse could end up getting the post on a permanent basis.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera
The move this week to downgrade a proposed Consumer Financial Protection Agency to lure bipartisan support instead appears to be undermining the Obama administration's effort to overhaul the nation's regulation of the entire industry. The overhaul, aimed at preventing a repeat of the economic meltdown that helped send the nation and world markets into a deep recession, now might be moving closer to the junk heap of congressional bills than to a significant new law. Creating a powerful and independent consumer agency, which is strongly opposed by the financial industry and Republicans, has been the major roadblock in drafting a bill that could pass in the Senate.
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