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Valerie Plame

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NATIONAL
July 7, 2005 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
The court hearing that resulted in New York Times reporter Judith Miller being sent to jail and Time magazine reporter Matthew Cooper agreeing to testify before a federal grand jury stemmed from a 2-year-old dispute related to President Bush's claim that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction. Question: How did the case get started? Answer: In July 2003, several Washington-based reporters were following up on statements by former U.S. envoy Joseph C. Wilson IV. The retired diplomat had written a newspaper article accusing Bush of "misrepresenting the facts" when Bush suggested that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, before he was ousted in the U.S.-led war, had sought uranium from Niger for atomic weapons.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 19, 2011 | By Rick Pearson, Chicago Tribune
Speaking a few paces from Chicago U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald's offices, former Vice President Dick Cheney said today that his former chief of staff did not deserve prosecution by the federal prosecutor in the Valerie Plame case. “Well, I obviously had some fundamental disagreements with him at one point in the past,” Cheney told a luncheon audience of more than 400 people at the Union League Club, 67 W. Jackson Blvd., when asked if he had anything to say to Fitzgerald.
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NATIONAL
August 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
Columnist Robert Novak broke his silence Monday about his disclosure of an undercover CIA operative's identity, defending himself against a former agency official's account that he twice warned Novak not to publish the name. In his syndicated column, Novak did not dispute that former CIA spokesman Bill Harlow had told him during conversations before his July 14, 2003, column, in which he named covert officer Valerie Plame, that he should not do so.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Fair Game" is an unintentionally perplexing film. Strongly written about a potent and still-relevant subject, smartly directed by Doug Liman and forcefully acted by Naomi Watts, Sean Penn and a carefully selected supporting cast, it seems to be doing everything right but still doesn't manage to leave you with a completely satisfied feeling. Certainly, "Fair Game's" subject matter is inherently dramatic. It relates the ripped-from-the-headlines story of Valerie Plame (Watts), a covert CIA officer who found her cover blown and her professional life destroyed by "the most powerful men in the history of the world.
NATIONAL
February 5, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Former vice presidential aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby's defense in his perjury trial rests largely on the claim that he was too busy with pressing affairs of state to recall minor events such as conversations with reporters about an obscure CIA employee.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2005 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
The New York Times' long campaign in defense of reporter Judith Miller provoked substantial dissension within the newspaper and left it flat-footed as it tried to cover unfolding allegations that top aides in the Bush administration might have illegally exposed the identity of a CIA operative, the newspaper reported in today's editions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2009 | Johanna Neuman, Neuman is a former Times staff writer who contributes to the Top of the Ticket blog.
Robert Novak, the longtime syndicated columnist and television commentator who was at the center of a furor late in his career as the first journalist to disclose the identity of CIA operative Valerie Plame, died today. He was 78. Novak died at his home in Washington after battling brain cancer, his family told the Associated Press. Novak was diagnosed with a brain tumor in July 2008. He told friends his doctors were not optimistic, but he opted for surgery anyway, telling them they were being too conservative.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2005 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
A story published by the New York Times on Sunday to clarify its coverage of the Valerie Plame leak case has instead raised a series of new questions and complaints about veteran reporter Judith Miller and her supervisors in the long-running controversy.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
NBC's Tim Russert and a journalist from Time Inc. have received federal subpoenas to face questioning about the alleged leak of an undercover CIA weapons expert's identity, but both news organizations said they would fight the subpoenas.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Columnist Robert Novak said publicly for the first time Tuesday that White House political advisor Karl Rove was a source for his story outing the identity of CIA officer Valerie Plame. In a column, Novak also says his recollection of his conversation with Rove differs from what the Rove camp has said. "I have revealed Rove's name because his attorney has divulged the substance of our conversation, though in a form different from my recollection," Novak wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Scott Kraft, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from New York ? To tell the big-screen tale of Valerie Plame, a real-life CIA spy whose covert identity was blown by the White House, director Doug Liman needed a special kind of actress: someone who could build an emotional wall around herself and still convey "a sense that there's a good person inside her. " He was convinced that that actress was Naomi Watts. But after a pre-shoot with Watts and costar Sean Penn last year, Liman called his producer in a panic. "We've got to toughen Naomi up, a.s.a.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2010 | By Rachel Abramowitz, Los Angeles Times
When filmmaker Doug Liman was growing up in New York, he was fascinated by the mythic world of spies like James Bond. Yet, he also was tantalized by glimpses of the real world of espionage offered by his late father, Arthur L. Liman, the famed litigator who grilled Oliver North on behalf of Congress during the Iran-Contra investigation of the Reagan administration. "It was a top secret investigation into the National Security Agency," Liman recalls. "[I was] seeing all the mechanics of how classified information worked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2009 | Johanna Neuman, Neuman is a former Times staff writer who contributes to the Top of the Ticket blog.
Robert Novak, the longtime syndicated columnist and television commentator who was at the center of a furor late in his career as the first journalist to disclose the identity of CIA operative Valerie Plame, died today. He was 78. Novak died at his home in Washington after battling brain cancer, his family told the Associated Press. Novak was diagnosed with a brain tumor in July 2008. He told friends his doctors were not optimistic, but he opted for surgery anyway, telling them they were being too conservative.
OPINION
February 12, 2009
Re "Rove versus leakers," Feb. 10 I want to thank Karl Rove for giving us all a good laugh during these dark times. The idea that no one in the world knew that the U.S. intercepted e-mails and cellphone calls before the New York Times ran an article about it was really funny, though I suppose he might have made it more laughable if he'd admitted that the twist was that the government was intercepting the e-mails and phone calls of its own citizens....
NATIONAL
June 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The House Judiciary Committee subpoenaed Atty. Gen. Michael B. Mukasey for transcripts of interviews with President Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney and former presidential advisor Karl Rove during the federal inquiry into the leak of then-CIA agent Valerie Plame's identity. The subpoena requests all documents from the office of former Special Counsel Patrick J. Fitzgerald relating to interviews of Bush, Cheney and their aides that were conducted outside the presence of a grand jury investigating the leak.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2008 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Former White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan, testifying before the House Judiciary Committee on Friday, said he was suspicious of I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby's denial that he had leaked the name of a CIA agent but had no choice but to go along with it. McClellan's testimony came shortly after his author's tour for "What Happened: Inside the Bush White House and Washington's Culture of Deception," the memoir that created a stir in the capital when it was published last month.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The House Judiciary Committee subpoenaed Atty. Gen. Michael B. Mukasey for transcripts of interviews with President Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney and former presidential advisor Karl Rove during the federal inquiry into the leak of then-CIA agent Valerie Plame's identity. The subpoena requests all documents from the office of former Special Counsel Patrick J. Fitzgerald relating to interviews of Bush, Cheney and their aides that were conducted outside the presence of a grand jury investigating the leak.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Vice President Dick Cheney asked a federal judge Tuesday to dismiss a lawsuit brought against him by a former CIA operative who says the White House leaked her identity to the media. Cheney's attorneys criticized the lawsuit in court papers, saying it invented constitutional rights, intruded on national security discussions and came two years after the statute of limitations had expired.
OPINION
June 17, 2008
Re "Everyman of TV politics," June 14 I join all those saddened by Tim Russert's death. I can't help feeling that I have lost a good friend. I will miss watching him Sunday mornings, moderating "Meet the Press" with so much class. I will miss the information he provided during his frequent appearances on the nightly news. Most of all, I will sorely miss his perspective when there is an election. I feel like finding a little white board and writing: Thank you, Tim Russert, for all you did for us. Jon White Monrovia -- Re "Affable, with Irish gusto for politics," June 14 "If it's Sunday, it's 'Meet the Press.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Former White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan blames President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney for efforts to mislead the public about the role of White House aides in leaking the identity of a CIA operative. In an excerpt from his forthcoming book, "What Happened," McClellan recounts the 2003 news conference in which he told reporters that aides Karl Rove and I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby were "not involved" in the leak involving operative Valerie Plame. "There was one problem.
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