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Vallarta Supermarkets

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Latino supermarket chain has removed gum-ball machines selling controversial Latino figurines from its stores after police and prosecutors complained the toys glamorize gang life. "The Vallarta Supermarkets Family wishes everyone to know that it DOES NOT support violence or toys depicting violence and regrets this incident," according to a written statement the company issued Tuesday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 7, 2004 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Davenport Institute for Public Policy at Pepperdine University. He is finishing a history of cities for Modern Library.
The supermarket strike was widely portrayed in local media and among politicians and analysts as a battle between corporate greed and workers' needs, with the giant market chains cast in the role of economic villain. But in reality, market-chain power was far weaker than ballyhooed and probably will not grow after the strike. The best evidence of this was the remarkable ease with which most Southern Californians managed the strike.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While his friends went to the beach and relaxed, Enrique Gonzalez Jr.'s high school summer vacations were filled with work at his father's meat market in Van Nuys. "I felt bad I couldn't enjoy life as a teenager, but my attitude was to get ahead," said Gonzalez, who worked up to 80 hours a week as a butcher, cashier, janitor and stock boy. "My plan was to help my father as much as I could."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Latino supermarket chain has removed gum ball machines selling controversial "Homie" figurines after police and prosecutors complained that the toys glamorize gang life. "The Vallarta Supermarkets Family wishes everyone to know that it DOES NOT support violence or toys depicting violence and regrets this incident," according to a written statement the company issued Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Latino supermarket chain has removed gum ball machines selling controversial "Homie" figurines after police and prosecutors complained that the toys glamorize gang life. "The Vallarta Supermarkets Family wishes everyone to know that it DOES NOT support violence or toys depicting violence and regrets this incident," according to a written statement the company issued Tuesday.
OPINION
March 7, 2004 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Davenport Institute for Public Policy at Pepperdine University. He is finishing a history of cities for Modern Library.
The supermarket strike was widely portrayed in local media and among politicians and analysts as a battle between corporate greed and workers' needs, with the giant market chains cast in the role of economic villain. But in reality, market-chain power was far weaker than ballyhooed and probably will not grow after the strike. The best evidence of this was the remarkable ease with which most Southern Californians managed the strike.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1999 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Certified Grocers of California, a Commerce-based cooperative that supplies independent supermarket chains, said Tuesday it has found buyers for 26 of the 32 divested stores purchased from Albertson's following its merger with American Stores Co. The sale of the stores, which are located from San Diego County to Santa Barbara, will give a number of independent operators--all supplied by Certified--a foothold in new markets. It will also give one ethnic supermarket chain, Carson-based K.V.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three robbers fled with $24,000 in cash after holding a supermarket manager's family hostage and demanding ransom from the store, authorities said Monday. The night manager of Vallarta Supermarket in Canoga Park handed over the money about 11:30 p.m. Sunday, after an armed man and woman took the manager's wife and child hostage at their Quartz Hill home, said Lt. Richard Lichten of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Lancaster station. No one was injured, and authorities said they had no suspects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three extortionists escaped with $24,000 in cash after taking a supermarket manager's family hostage and demanding ransom from the store, authorities said Monday. The night manager of the Vallarta Supermarket in Canoga Park handed over the money about 11:30 p.m. Sunday, after an armed man and woman took the manager's wife and child hostage at their Quartz Hill home, said Lt. Richard Lichten of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department station in Lancaster.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2008 | Conor L. Sanchez, Times Staff Writer
Two small ethnic grocery-store chains are combining in a bid to grab a greater share of the Latino market in Southern California. On Monday evening, the Gigante chain of seven stores will close its doors, reopening Tuesday morning as part of its competitor, the El Super chain. In all, there will be 15 El Super markets in Southern California. The name change follows the May purchase of all seven Gigante stores by City of Commerce-based Bodega Latina Corp., which operates El Super.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Latino supermarket chain has removed gum-ball machines selling controversial Latino figurines from its stores after police and prosecutors complained the toys glamorize gang life. "The Vallarta Supermarkets Family wishes everyone to know that it DOES NOT support violence or toys depicting violence and regrets this incident," according to a written statement the company issued Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While his friends went to the beach and relaxed, Enrique Gonzalez Jr.'s high school summer vacations were filled with work at his father's meat market in Van Nuys. "I felt bad I couldn't enjoy life as a teenager, but my attitude was to get ahead," said Gonzalez, who worked up to 80 hours a week as a butcher, cashier, janitor and stock boy. "My plan was to help my father as much as I could."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2004 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
Ten years ago, it seemed the world couldn't get enough of Reseda Boulevard. Maybe you remember the photos and the TV images: the victims, huddled in blankets, crying on the sidewalk; the lines of shellshocked people waiting to buy food and water at the Ralphs at the corner of Devonshire Street.
FOOD
July 2, 2008 | Amy Scattergood, Times Staff Writer
ON COUNTERS of neighborhood taquerias and Oaxacan restaurants, at Salvadoran farmers market stands and Eastside backyard parties, even at swank Hollywood restaurants, you can see the huge glass vitroleros, beehive-shaped jars filled with aguas frescas in a spectrum of stunning colors.
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