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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1994 | GERALD A. SILVER and MYRNA L. SILVER, Gerald A. Silver and Myrna L. Silver live in Encino. Gerald Silver is president of Homeowners of Encino and is a member of the Transportation Summit, an advisory committee on Valley bus transportation
Public transportation agencies have allocated $500,000 for a major study designed to restructure bus service in the San Fernando Valley. It could not have come at a better time, because the much-publicized rail projects under way or under study will take decades to complete. Any solution to our transportation problems must recognize a fundamental reality: Transit in the Valley is a patchwork quilt. Thousands of jobs are intermixed with thousands of residents. This creates a vast crisscrossing of people going from home to work.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1995
The editorial cartoon on the Valley Commentary page of June 4 presented a patch of grass as the Chavez Memorial to ridicule those trying to stop the renaming of Kalisher Street to Cesar Chavez, as proposed by San Fernando City Councilwoman Rosa Chacon. Actually, a patch of growing grass as a monument is more in keeping with the wishes of the Cesar Chavez I knew. Cesar could have lived his last days in the comfort of a Washington townhouse instead of dying in an isolated farmhouse if he had been willing to sing the theme songs of the Washington welfare system--a system he felt turned honest, hard-working men and women into chattels of the state.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1994 | GIDEON KANNER, Gideon Kanner is professor of law emeritus at Loyola Law School
Suppose you run a business and you see drug-peddling or prostitution outside your store. What should you do? Call the police as a good citizen should? You had better think twice these days if you live in the Valley. As crazy as it sounds, you might get sued by the city if you do that. Criminal activity has blighted areas around Van Nuys and Sepulveda boulevards. Convenience and doughnut shops that make their living by staying open around the clock are particularly hard hit. Night-owl criminals hang around those businesses--after all, they need their hit of caffeine the same as anyone else.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1995
The question posed by your headline "Fallout From MCA Expansion Plan--Benefit or Blight?" (Valley Commentary, April 30) is answered simply--both benefit and blight are received, but in differing degrees. The banner of "new jobs" is becoming a catchword to stir our patriotism and brand those in opposition as anti-family or left-wing extremists . . . you know, the feared "radical environmentalists." If you are against jobs, you must want to outlaw apple pie and moms. Fact is though, the harm done by further expansion will far outweigh the benefit of the jobs MCA alleges it will create.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1994 | PAUL CLARKE, Paul Clarke of Northridge is a corporate political consultant
With the June 7 defeat of the state earthquake bond proposal, Proposition 1A, the city of Los Angeles lost more than $55 million in funds to help the San Fernando Valley repair some of its damage and to retrofit freeways and bridges. The defeat was a surprise to many. A similar bond issue, Proposition 122, had passed statewide easily in June, 1990, following the 7.1 San Francisco earthquake. We also had a temporary half-cent sales tax increase then to cover those losses. Shortly after the San Francisco quake, the Federal Emergency Management Agency estimated that an 8.3 earthquake in Los Angeles would cause $17 billion in damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1994 | ROSELLE M. LEWIS, Roselle M. Lewis of Tarzana is a free-lance writer who teaches English at Pierce and Valley colleges
When I totaled my car recently, I worried more about auto insurance than medical insurance. For years I'd been covered by what is considered the country's best health maintenance organization, the group that promises comprehensive womb-to-tomb care. I'd had some checkups but hadn't used the system much. Unfortunately, my first real encounter with the so-called "managed care" system toward which the country is moving so fast--and which is the cornerstone of President Clinton's health care plan--proved to be traumatic in several ways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1994 | MARALYN SOIFER, Maralyn Soifer of West Hills, an educational therapist, has a daughter in the Class of 1994 at El Camino Real High School in Woodland Hills. and
It rained on El Camino Real High School's prom night. That didn't dampen the spirits of one group of graduates of the Woodland Hills school posing in front of a limousine. As the parents eyed the darkening sky nervously, the girls pinned boutonnieres on their dates and checked their hair in the car mirrors. The boys grinned, fumbled with corsages and slapped one another on the back. Except for the showers, it was perfect. But clouds have been following this class. The students have been at the mercy of arbitrary school board decisions, bureaucratic foul-ups and, literally, death and destruction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994 | RICHARD KATZ, Richard Katz represents the 39th District in the California Assembly
For many people in Los Angeles, Big Tujunga Wash has become a symbol, a reminder of what our area looked like hundreds of years ago, before developers bulldozed and before people settled. When Cosmo World announced it was going to build a private 18-hole golf course on the land, local residents and environmentalists throughout the state were outraged, myself included. The wash is the latest in a long line of L.A.'s natural areas to be threatened by developers. But it is more than just another flood plain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1994 | DON SALPER, Don Salper of Northridge is a professor emeritus at Cal State Northridge
I miss Bullock's. Well, I don't exactly miss Bullock's. I miss the Bullock's building. Oh, I bought a few things at the Northridge store over the years, as did my wife; I think I'll always remember the light green leisure suit I bought there in the '70s, which I loved (did I really wear that to teach classes at CSUN?). What I really miss though, is the structure, the architecture, which was taken away from us so rudely by the earthquake. There was something about that building that caught my eye every time I drove by on Tampa Avenue, whether or not I had any business at the Fashion Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1994
Three cheers for Rich Sybert (Valley Commentary, June 26.) His analysis of the overwhelming cost of caring for illegal immigrants is right on the nose, especially the cost of illegitimate births among illegals and the cost of bilingual education of the offspring of illegals. The illegals have destroyed the social safety nets that have existed for legal Americans. E.H. BROUDY Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1995
The article "Conservancy Should Sell Streisand Land" (Valley Commentary, March 12) by William Wells of the Coalition to Preserve Las Virgenes was well taken, especially by those who are weary of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy's failure to focus on habitat protection. After all, the conservancy could be preserving parking lots if mere open space were the point. Instead, here they are, desperately clinging to the "Streisand Center," which we taxpayers don't need and don't want.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1995
Marc Litchman, the self-proclaimed world-weary ex-staffer to elected officials and political consultant, who will be leaving the "world's oldest democracy to help start the world's youngest--in Haiti" (Valley Commentary, Jan. 8), sarcastically includes a "nasty little list of things that a young country needs if it wants a real American-style democracy." I take exception with his statement that one of the bogus "needs" is "homeowners associations consisting mainly of attorneys, screenwriters and others with influence, so everybody can be against lots of different things at the same time."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1994
Rich Sybert, Republican candidate for Congress, would use the U. S. Army to fight crime (Valley Commentary, Oct. 9). What next? Should we arm politically reliable civilians to assist the Army? We could call them attaches. No one has used Army troops for permanent general police duties in America since George III. Most true conservatives, myself included, are very distrustful of anyone who would expand federal power, especially federal police power. KENNETH WILKE Calabasas
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1994 | JEFF BRAIN, Jeff Brain is past president of the Sherman Oaks Chamber of Commerce and co-chair of the Sherman Oaks Town Council. He is a candidate for the 5th District council seat
In the first week of December, Zev Yaroslavsky will prematurely vacate his Los Angeles City Council seat to assume his new role as a county supervisor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1994 | ADRIENNE MACK, Adrienne Mack teaches high school English in the Los Angeles public schools
On those days when my enthusiasm wanes, I look at education in Los Angeles and feel like we're caught in an eddy spiraling downward. I feel myself being pulled down by the educational bureaucracy, which, while it advocates change and even makes some changes, remains relatively untouched. I'm afraid LEARN may be just another paper tiger. In 1991, a coalition of business leaders, educators and parents got together to determine how our schools should look as we enter the 21st Century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1994 | LES BOSTON, Les Boston is a free-lance writer and editor and a former English teacher at Valley College
Pierce College has its problems and now boasts the beginnings of a plan to address them. The problems are well-known: Budget cuts have slashed programs; students can't get classes needed for graduation; facilities are run down, and enrollment has dropped--which means still less money for the college. The plan is less well-known and still in the formative stages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1994
Michael Connelly (Valley Commentary, June 26) must not have been a very busy crime reporter if he found it far-fetched that a man with a violent history of beating, harassing and terrorizing women was accused of murder. There is no surprise if O.J. Simpson did commit these murders. In fact, it would make for a very predictable movie. JACKIE BOGOSIAN Calabasas
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1994
Rich Sybert, Republican candidate for Congress, would use the U. S. Army to fight crime (Valley Commentary, Oct. 9). What next? Should we arm politically reliable civilians to assist the Army? We could call them attaches. No one has used Army troops for permanent general police duties in America since George III. Most true conservatives, myself included, are very distrustful of anyone who would expand federal power, especially federal police power. KENNETH WILKE Calabasas
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1994
I recently wrote an article describing frustration over the termination of commuter bus service from the Antelope Valley to Century City and Beverly Hills by the Antelope Valley Transit Authority (Valley Commentary, July 24). Many of the affected commuters took off work, attended a regularly scheduled board meeting July 25 and, armed with a list of riders and other proposals, petitioned it to consider reinstating the service to West Los Angeles. The board asked AVTA staff to return to the drawing board and report back at a special meeting on Aug. 8. In the meantime, a second group of Westsiders met with the AVTA executive staff on a Saturday for a true working meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1994
Three cheers for Rich Sybert (Valley Commentary, June 26.) His analysis of the overwhelming cost of caring for illegal immigrants is right on the nose, especially the cost of illegitimate births among illegals and the cost of bilingual education of the offspring of illegals. The illegals have destroyed the social safety nets that have existed for legal Americans. E.H. BROUDY Sherman Oaks
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