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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1993
Only in Los Angeles can a company ruin a good thing as the Los Angeles Times has done. Your "new" Valley Edition is awful. Why would you make changes that make the paper a dozen times more difficult to follow? When you made drastic changes about a year ago or so, I thought you had done a great job with the Page 2 summary as well as the other changes. Now it's gone. Also gone is the Lotto information on Page 1 of the Metro section. I find the paper impossible to follow. Please go back to the old format.
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MAGAZINE
January 6, 2002
After 13 years in trendy Brentwood, I moved to Studio City less than two years ago. Since then, I have read perhaps one real restaurant review emanating from the San Fernando Valley, aside from those once-a-year favorites lists. Are you oblivious to the great restaurants on Ventura Boulevard alone? Do you ever venture over the hill? I cannot stress how much I miss the weekly restaurant reviews by Max Jacobson that used to appear in the Valley edition. Trust me, there are many restaurant fanatics out here in no-man's-land, and we're craving attention, specifically reviews!
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BUSINESS
June 4, 1993
The Los Angeles Times appointed two editors to oversee its expanded Valley edition. John Arthur was named editor, and Ardith Hilliard was appointed the edition's managing editor. Both appointments were announced by Carol Stogsdill, senior editor. Arthur, 46, was recently an assistant editor on The Times' National desk. Previously, he worked at The Times' Orange County edition and was managing editor for news when that edition underwent major expansion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2001
David Elgenson's letter supporting the busway route on Oxnard Street as opposed to Chandler Boulevard because it is denser feeds into a common misunderstanding (Letters to the Valley Edition, April 22). The Oxnard route actually is projected to show a lower ridership than Chandler. This is because the Oxnard route is longer, slower, actually gridlocked at times, and does not benefit from a 100-foot-wide tree-lined median. The east-west busway needs to be thought of in its entirety as an efficient, direct parallel to the Ventura Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1993
I wish to correct an impression left by your report on the establishment of Sierra Canyon's middle school (Sept. 17). As a parent who attended the hearing before the Board of Zoning Appeals, I can attest to the fact that the neighbors who objected could be counted on one hand. Conditions were offered and agreed upon by the school to keep traffic and noise to a minimum. In addition, the school demonstrated that parents and faculty do not use the unpaved roads but instead approach on Rinaldi Street, which is paved and wide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1993
I simply couldn't let the incredibly elitist comments on a proposed monorail by Gerald A. Silver, president of Homeowners of Encino, pass by. On May 14, Mr. Silver was quoted as saying, in part: "It would bring rail service to people with BMWs and Mercedeses. They are not the ones who would use a rail system. It's unrealistic to expect a resident of the Encino Hills to drive his BMW to a station at, say, Hayvenhurst and take the train to work. But in areas north of here, these people don't have 450s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1993
Your story of Aug. 17 ("Alarcon Backs Idea of Redevelopment Study") portrays Pacoima as the most impoverished community in the Valley. It has become impoverished only because the Anglo community and the government have allowed illegal immigrants to flood into Los Angeles, and they have become the "new slaves" within the city. They are paid slave wages; therefore they are only able to reside in communities which have been traditionally working- and middle-class black communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1993
My wife and I graduated from Cal State Northridge in 1967. We did not go through the graduation ceremony. It was not a thing for politically active students on the left to do then. We were concerned about the spreading War in Vietnam, opposed to silly rituals and determined to make America a true democracy responsive to the needs of minorities and ordinary people everywhere. People do change over time. Twenty-six years later, I found myself sitting through a graduation ceremony at Cal State Northridge for my two oldest daughters, Regina and Stephanie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
Craig Lennon Kysar asserts that history and current events show a "free market economy do not lead to people getting what they need, but instead lead to rich people getting what they want" (Letters to the Valley Edition, April 1). If Kysar's assertion is correct then how is it that American entrepreneurs, starting with Henry Ford, have been so successful in being able to mass produce expensive items such as cars, refrigerators, television sets, computers and so on, at prices most Americans can afford?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001
On March 4, Charles W. Diggs Jr. wrote, "Now, what I want to say to Southpaw Jones is, 'Man, you ain't seen no blues, yet,' white or otherwise," (Letters to the Valley Edition). This was his response to Katherine Tolford's article about my music (Valley Life, Feb. 23). Frankly, he's right. As a young white male, the only "blues" I confront are shallow dilemmas like Napster lawsuits, neck hair and people who don't read articles fully before they jump to conclusions and respond. So what right do I have to wail?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001
I appreciate your editorial, "Teaching Peace," (Valley Edition, March 11) and your support for programs that address the deeper and more complex factors that give rise to violence. I note that some of those programs tend to focus on stopping something, such as hate speech or bullying behavior. I abhor violence in every form, but if our attention is on stopping something we don't want, we have less energy for creating what we do want--people knowing how to meet their needs in ways we can all enjoy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001
It costs about $600,000 to lock up a man for life but nearly $10 million to execute him, after exhausting all proper appeals. I wonder if the reader who suggested (Letters to the Valley Edition, Jan. 21) that when the death penalty is abolished, bleeding-heart liberals who have opposed capital punishment should board violent felons in their homes at government expense, would also let us keep, say, half the difference saved to the taxpayers? Sign me up. KIRT THIESMEYER Glendale
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2001
Rick Rofman's letter (Letters to the Valley Edition, Jan. 7) alleging the renaming of the speech and drama building at Cal State Northridge "Nordhoff Hall" confuses Charles B. Nordhoff (1887-1947), the co-author of "Mutiny on the Bounty," with his grandfather and namesake. Charles Nordhoff (1830-1901) was the author of "California for Health, Pleasure, and Residence," a bestseller in the 1870s. The town of Ojai was originally named for Nordhoff because he wrote about the attractions of Ojai Valley, and Nordhoff Street, the south border of CSUN, was named for him. "Nordhoff Hall" is just a coincidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2000
It was ironic to find The Times Valley Edition editorial extolling Councilman Hal Bernson for obtaining an agreement to reserve 400 northwest Valley homes for low-income housing ("Prosperity Is Not Shared by All," Nov. 26) next to four letters opposing the Ahmanson Ranch development in the West Valley ("Ahmanson Ranch Development," Letters to the Valley Edition). The Ahmanson Ranch is, indeed, a beautiful area. I know it well, having spent many years running through it, often chased out by the Ahmanson guards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2000
The letter of Dec. 3 pertaining to the racist remark (Letters to the Valley Edition) illustrates why one can believe in affirmative action and be against racial profiling without being a hypocrite. These people have been maligned by this country for over 200 years and although there are civil rights laws now on the books, African Americans still do not have an equal footing. And until they do, this special class of citizen deserves special treatment and consideration. As long as there are people who can "logically" believe in racial profiling and be against affirmative action, we can logically oppose both of their positions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2000
As one of student Anita Martinez's [Advanced Placement] teachers, let me concur with her assessment that standardized tests, as constructed, are a waste of time (Letters to the Valley Edition, Nov. 12). Parents and politicians, if you want to judge a school, visit the school, talk to the teachers, the parents and the kids, and quit reading a bunch of statistics. And quit wasting valuable class time with tests that aren't even given at the end of the course. MICHAEL HELWIG Canoga Park
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