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Valley Generating Station

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers at the Valley Generating Station ran from one end of the plant to the other Tuesday, checking for possible water leaks as alarms beeped. With midday temperatures hovering around 100, all 38 workers made sure the plant's units generated energy at maximum capacity, 330 million watts. "Entire countries can live with this energy," said Nazih S. Batarseh, city of Los Angeles generating stations manager. "This is just one of four plants in the city."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers at the Valley Generating Station ran from one end of the plant to the other Tuesday, checking for possible water leaks as alarms beeped. With midday temperatures hovering around 100, all 38 workers made sure the plant's units generated energy at maximum capacity, 330 million watts. "Entire countries can live with this energy," said Nazih S. Batarseh, city of Los Angeles generating stations manager. "This is just one of four plants in the city."
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SPORTS
June 25, 1989 | JEFF MEYERS, Times Staff Writer
Bluebird Field in Sun Valley was created as a field of dreams, existing only in the netherworld of Hollywood make-believe. MTM Enterprises built it in 1983 as the home of the "Bay City Blues," a fictitious minor league team and a weekly NBC television series bearing the same name. The Blues didn't win very often, but the only statistics that really counted were Nielsen ratings. And they were bad enough to cause the network to drop the series after only eight episodes. It was when the series was canceled and MTM packed up its cameras that a strange thing happened to Bluebird Field: It came to life.
SPORTS
June 25, 1989 | JEFF MEYERS, Times Staff Writer
Bluebird Field in Sun Valley was created as a field of dreams, existing only in the netherworld of Hollywood make-believe. MTM Enterprises built it in 1983 as the home of the "Bay City Blues," a fictitious minor league team and a weekly NBC television series bearing the same name. The Blues didn't win very often, but the only statistics that really counted were Nielsen ratings. And they were bad enough to cause the network to drop the series after only eight episodes. It was when the series was canceled and MTM packed up its cameras that a strange thing happened to Bluebird Field: It came to life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's Valley Generating Station was a quiet place for about five years. Its four generators lay dormant, and, in recent years, only one worker oversaw the place. But the plant bustled with activity Thursday when two gas-powered generators were symbolically activated. The steam-generating units, which have been operating since June, will provide 252 megawatts of electrical power to half a million Valley households, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1996 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A stuntman died early Saturday from head injuries after plunging 57 feet from a power plant platform in Sun Valley during the filming of a police drama. The dead man was identified as Paul Dallas, 34, of Canyon Country. Police said Dallas struck his head after landing on the edge of the air bag that was supposed to break his three-story fall from a platform at the Department of Water and Power plant Friday night. "He was ejected backward," said Los Angeles Police Sgt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1990 | GABE FUENTES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power announced plans Friday to build a 10-mile pipeline to expand its use of reclaimed water in the San Fernando Valley. The pipeline plan was conceived in the late 1960s but is being implemented now to demonstrate the city's commitment to water conservation at a time when Mayor Tom Bradley is seeking to impose citywide water rationing measures, said Bruce Kuebler, assistant chief engineer of the DWP's water system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salvaging a project to boost local power production, the Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to pay a new partnership $228 million to build a plant to replace the San Fernando Valley Generating Station. When finished in 2004, the plant should produce 500 megawatts, enough to power 450,000 homes, with a savings of $50 million each year from enhanced fuel efficiency and with less pollution, said Enrique Martinez, assistant general manager of the Department of Water and Power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1999 | PATRICK MCGREEVY
In a setback to efforts to revitalize the northeast San Fernando Valley, the Los Angeles Redevelopment Board voted Thursday to rescind a contract to develop an economic development strategy after the firm failed to do the work. The board voted Thursday to give the $180,000 contract to Gruen Associates, after another firm hired in 1997 failed to respond to repeated requests by the agency to develop an economic strategy for 600 acres around Hansen Dam, city officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of his ongoing effort to transform the Department of Water and Power into a competitive business, General Manager S. David Freeman is proposing to sell the city's share of a massive coal-burning power plant in the Nevada desert and invest $1.7 billion in cleaner facilities in the Los Angeles Basin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles school officials warned Thursday that the Department of Water and Power site proposed by state Sen. Richard Alarcon for a high school in the northeast Valley raises serious safety concerns, including the possibility of flooding and toxicity, besides not being centrally located to serve the burgeoning student population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting after failed talks with a local labor union chief, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power announced Friday that it will reopen bidding for a power plant in Sun Valley, delaying construction for at least six months. Brian D'Arcy, head of the union representing 5,500 electrical workers, plumbers and other city employees, challenged the award of the $238-million contract to a nonunion builder. The plant was scheduled to be completed in May 2003.
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