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Valley Institute Of Visual Art

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2000 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
The Valley Institute of Visual Art wanted to mark the third anniversary of its VIVA Gallery in Northridge with a major show by an important local artist. After considering a number of names, the board of directors decided to celebrate by mounting a retrospective of the work of 85-year-old George Labadie, a longtime resident of Woodland Hills and a much lauded watercolorist. According to artist and board member Susan Kuss, VIVA plans to have such retrospectives annually.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2003 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
The white walls of Northridge's VIVA Gallery, inauspiciously located in a mini-mall near a Burger King, sparkle with paintings of Tuscan hill towns, Big Sur and other landscapes by artist Gerald Brommer. VIVA -- the Valley Institute of Visual Art -- is celebrating its fourth anniversary with an overview of the work of the noted Studio City artist and teacher. And, to some observers, the very fact of VIVA's survival constitutes a miracle on Reseda Boulevard.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2003 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
The white walls of Northridge's VIVA Gallery, inauspiciously located in a mini-mall near a Burger King, sparkle with paintings of Tuscan hill towns, Big Sur and other landscapes by artist Gerald Brommer. VIVA -- the Valley Institute of Visual Art -- is celebrating its fourth anniversary with an overview of the work of the noted Studio City artist and teacher. And, to some observers, the very fact of VIVA's survival constitutes a miracle on Reseda Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2000 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
The Valley Institute of Visual Art wanted to mark the third anniversary of its VIVA Gallery in Northridge with a major show by an important local artist. After considering a number of names, the board of directors decided to celebrate by mounting a retrospective of the work of 85-year-old George Labadie, a longtime resident of Woodland Hills and a much lauded watercolorist. According to artist and board member Susan Kuss, VIVA plans to have such retrospectives annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2000
Name: Phillip Leonard Age: 28 Home: Northridge Profession: Develops programs and writes grant proposals for the nonprofit organization Los Angeles Community Services in Inglewood while completing graduate work in management, educational leadership and policy studies at Cal State Northridge. Latest accomplishment: Co-founded TOOLSHED, a nonprofit organization that offers arts, athletics and other programs to local youth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2000
Re "Official Fears Cultural Impact From Secession," Sept. 13. This was probably the most tongue-in-cheek, dry-humor fantasy discussion of an historical impossibility and futuristic improbability that I have ever read or heard discussed. A casual journey through San Fernando Valley attitudes and NIMBY activities will reveal an opposition to any venture smacking of culture--from minimal support of Circle in the Round theater, opposition to convention centers, to opposition to Olympic sites in the Sepulveda Basin, the list may prove to be endless.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999 | DIANE WEDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Connie Larson were a painting, she probably would be a Rousseau: brightly colored and fanciful. Those words describe well the high-energy activist who is often seen tearing around town spreading the gospel of art education. "Art liberates kids," said Larson, who could be speaking about her own years-long experience searching for creative fulfillment. "Luckily, I found my outlet, and I hope I've helped kids find an avenue where they can experience the joy of creating."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warren King wondered if he should get down on his knees and beg. Or make a polite suggestion. Or--dare he try it?--give an order to one of the world's most powerful men. On that autumn morning in a Paris airport at the height of World War II, the soft-spoken 19-year-old photographer fretted about how to approach George C. Marshall, the U.S. Army's chief of staff ultimately responsible for mobilizing 8.2 million soldiers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warren King wondered if he should beg, or--dare he try it?--give an order to one of the world's most powerful men. It was an autumn morning in Paris during World War II when the 19-year-old photographer fretted about how to approach Gen. George C. Marshall, the U.S. Army's chief of staff and the general responsible for mobilizing 8.2 million soldiers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2004 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
Once a favorite public mural, Kent Twitchell's so-called Freeway Lady was destroyed twice -- painted over by a billboard company in 1986, then vandalized while being restored in 2000. But now it appears that the 1974 "Old Woman of the Freeway," as the work is named, will rise again. And in a most unlikely place: on the side of the Valley Institute of Visual Art gallery in Sherman Oaks. "A second chance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2000 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
Want fries with that art? Just a year ago a community-oriented art gallery opened in the shadow of a Northridge Burger King. Founded by five Valley art organizations, the Valley Institute of Visual Art, or VIVA, was a triumph of vision and commitment over whatever complex forces have kept the Valley from having an art scene as vital as that on the Westside. "We were told we would never pull it off and get our doors open," recalls Connie Larson, president of VIVA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
In Northridge, you will soon be able to saunter from Burger King to the Valley's newest art gallery. Located in a modest shopping mall, the VIVA Gallery is a rarity on our side of the hill--one of the few dedicated spaces where artists can show and sell their work. Since Artspace in Warner Center closed two years ago, Valley artists have been forced to hang their work in restaurants, banks, even hair salons, where it often functions as decoration, says Connie Larson, president of VIVA.
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